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Security : Displaying 101-120 of 153


US: Judge rules in Iraq Whistle-Blower Case
by Sue PlemingReuters
July 11th, 2005
A U.S. judge ruled on Monday that a whistle-blower case alleging fraud against Custer Battles, a U.S. security contractor employed in Iraq could go ahead, but excluded any work paid for with Iraqi oil money.

US: Whistleblower suit against Custer Battles can proceed
by Matthew BarakatAssociated Press State & Local Wire
July 11th, 2005
Two whistleblowers who allege that a Fairfax-based contractor cheated taxpayers out of tens of millions of dollars on reconstruction projects in Iraq can proceed with their lawsuit, a judge has ruled. But parts of the ruling could have negative consequences for those who file similar claims against other contractors, according to a lawyer for the whistleblowers.

IRAQ: Families Sue Blackwater Over Deaths in Fallujah
by Louis Hansen compiled using reports by the Associated PressThe Virginian-Pilot
January 6th, 2005
Survivors of four Blackwater Security Consulting contractors who were killed and mutilated last year in Iraq sued the Moyock-based company Wednesday, saying it cut corners that led to the men's deaths.

AFGHANISTAN: Dyncorp Guards Chastised by U.S. State Department
BBC News
October 14th, 2004
The U.S. State Department has rebuked a private security firm, Dyncorp, over the "aggressive behavior" of guards hired to protect Afghan leader Hamid Karzai.

Iraq's Private Warriors
Facts and figures on: congressional budget allocations vs. actual expenditures; pay scales for Iraqi and foreign personnel; and comparisons of equipment ordered for Iraq and equipment delivered.

US: Conflict of interest may hurt nuke security: Critics charge testing of security at power plants is fatally flawed
by Lisa MyersMSNBC
September 4th, 2004
Since drawings of U.S. nuclear power plants were found in al-Qaida caves in Afghanistan, the nuclear power industry says it has spent $1 billion beefing up security. That includes more frequent and more realistic mock-terrorist attacks to test the ability of plant guards.

Iraq: Controversial Commando Wins Iraq Contract to Create the World's Largest Private Army
CorpWatch
June 10th, 2004
Three weeks before Iraq is to be handed over to a new government, the United States led occupation has quietly awarded a contract to create the world's largest private army to a company headed by Lieutenant Colonel Tim Spicer, a former officer with the Scots Guard, an elite regiment of the British military, who has been investigated for illegally smuggling arms and planning military offensives to support mining, oil, and gas operations around the world.

Give War a Chance: the Life and Times of Tim Spicer
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
June 9th, 2004
Strange or villianous, Tim Spicer's business partners over the years, have found themselves in hot water from Canada to Papua New Guinea and Zimbabwe, although he has always somehow managed to avoid prosecution.

Iraq: Reining In Contractors
by Jason Peckenpaugh and Shane HarrisGovernment Executive magazine
June 1st, 2004

Private Contractors and Torture at Abu Ghraib
by Pratap Chatterjee and A.C. ThompsonSpecial to CorpWatch
May 7th, 2004
Two private military contractors are being investigated for their role in torture allegations at the Abu Ghraib prison, Iraq: CACI from Arlington, Virginia, and Titan of San Diego, California.

Private Contractors and Torture at Abu Ghraib, Iraq
by Pratap Chatterjee and A.C. ThompsonSpecial to CorpWatch
May 7th, 2004
Two private military contractors are being investigated for their role in torture allegations at the Abu Ghraib prison, Iraq: CACI from Arlington, Virginia, and Titan of San Diego, California.

Titan's Translators in Trouble
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
May 6th, 2004
Titan corporation of San Diego, California, one of the two companies accused of complicity in the prison abuse scandal in Abu Ghraib, Iraq, is currently facing numerous federal investigations for work done in Iraq and around the world.

Iraq: No Guns for Contractors, Pentagon is Proposing
by Seth BorensteinPhiladelphia Inquirer
April 29th, 2004
As the insurgency in Iraq remains strong, the Department of Defense has proposed a new rule for most of the estimated 70,000 civilian contractors working in the region: They cannot carry guns.

IRAQ: 10 US Contractors Penalized
by Matt KelleyAssociated Press
April 26th, 2004
Ten companies with billions of dollars in U.S. contracts for Iraq reconstruction have paid more than $300 million in penalties since 2000 to resolve allegations of bid rigging, fraud, delivery of faulty military parts and environmental damage.

Iraq: Security Firm Will Hire a Nightclub Bouncer
by Bernard Ginns and John BynorthMail on Sunday, London
April 18th, 2004
The lives of contractors in Iraq are being put at risk by security firms prepared to employ untrained staff, a Mail on Sunday investigation reveals.

Iraq: More Limits Sought for Private Security Teams
by Mary Pat Flaherty and Dana PriestWashington Post
April 13th, 2004
With an estimated 20,000 private security workers on the ground, the Coalition Provisional Authority is increasingly concerned about the quality of the security teams, the weapons they use and the rules that will govern them after June 30, when the authority transfers political power to an interim Iraqi government.

Iraq: Security Firms Form World's Largest Private 'Army'
by Dana Priest and Mary Pat FlahertyWashington Post
April 8th, 2004
Under assault by insurgents and unable to rely on U.S. and coalition troops for intelligence or help under duress, private security firms in Iraq have begun to band together in the past 48 hours, organizing what may effectively be the largest private army in the world, with its own rescue teams and pooled, sensitive intelligence.

Zimbabwe: State-owned ZDI Sold Weapons to Mercenaries
Zimbabwe Independent
April 2nd, 2004

US: Blackwater Mercenaries Take Risks for Right Price
by James Dao, Eric Schmitt, and John F. BurnsNew York Times
April 2nd, 2004
Here, at the 6,000-acre training ground of Blackwater U.S.A., scores of former military commandos, police officers and civilians are prepared each month to join the lucrative but often deadly work of providing security for corporations and governments in the toughest corners of the globe. On Wednesday, four employees of a Blackwater unit -- most of them former American military Special Operations personnel -- were killed in an ambush in the central Iraqi city of Fallujah, their bodies mutilated and dragged through the streets by chanting crowds.

Iraq: Trade Fair Postponed Over Security Fears
by Joshua Chaffin and Salamander DavoudiFinancial Times
April 1st, 2004
The deteriorating security situation in Iraq has prompted the postponement of a US-led trade fair aimed at accelerating reconstruction in the country amid heightening concerns about the safety of foreign civilians working there. Organisers of Destination Baghdad Expo, that was due to begin on Monday, postponed the event following the gruesome killings on Wednesday of four western contract workers in the city of Falluja.

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