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World Financial Institutions

The International Monetary Fund and the World Trade Organization rule trade worldwide, ostensibly helping developing countries enter the 21st century by investing in their modernization, and regulating trade to allow smaller nations compete with the big boys. But this "aid" often comes with a heavy price. Developing nations are often driven into deep debt, and then forced to turn their public services over to multinational corporations. Meanwhile, trade rules force developing nations to weaken rules on labor and environment in order to remain competitive.


News Articles

EU: Court hits at Brussels secrecy
by Andy BoundsFinancial Times
November 8th, 2007
The European Union's secretive decision-making processes were condemned on Thursday in a legal judgment that should lead to more light being shed on how thousands of regulations affecting businesses are hatched.

CONGO: World Bank accused of razing Congo forests
by John VidalThe Guardian (UK)
October 4th, 2007
The World Bank encouraged foreign companies to destructively log the world's second largest forest, endangering the lives of thousands of Congolese Pygmies, according to a report on an internal investigation by senior bank staff and outside experts.

BRITAIN: Companies 'looting' a continent
by Fran AbramsBBC News
July 24th, 2007
Gordon Brown has signalled he wants to see poor countries develop through trade rather than aid.

WORLD: A Way for Resource-Rich Countries to Audit Their Way Out of Corruption
by Tyler CowenThe New York Times
July 12th, 2007
An Oxford economist has a new and potentially powerful idea: setting up an voluntary international charter to guide transparency efforts in resource-rich developing countries, in order to stave of corruption.

UGANDA: African forest under threat from sugar cane plantation
by Daniel HowdenThe Independent (UK)
July 10th, 2007
Conservationists in Uganda are fighting a last-ditch battle to stop the destruction of a forest reserve by a sugar corporation friendly with the government.