Contact l Sitemap

home industries issues reasearch weblog press

Home  » Industries » War & Disaster Profiteering » Company Profiles » Halliburton

Halliburton : Displaying 75-87 of 87


UN: Board Cites U.S. Contractor in Iraq
by Colum LynchWashington Post
December 15th, 2004

IRAQ: Silence Surrounds Fates of Contractors
by David IvanovichHouston Chronicle
November 21st, 2004
Halliburton Co. truck drivers Tim Bell and Bill Bradley disappeared April 9 when their convoy was attacked west of Baghdad. The Army has conducted an investigation into the ambush, but the report is classified. Pentagon officials refused to discuss its contents, directing questions to Halliburton. The company referred questions back to the Pentagon.

Kuwait Documents Allege Halliburton Bribe Scandal
by David PhinneySpecial to Corpwatch
November 11th, 2004
Newly revealed documents, dating from December 2003 and the early months of 2004, allege that Halliburton staff in Kuwait asked for kickbacks from selected contractors while undermining others who were looking for work from the multi-billion dollar contracts that the company oversees for the military occupation force in Iraq.

Halliburton Hit with Multiple Lawsuits
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
October 27th, 2004
Companies working in support of U.S. troops in Iraq are hauling Houston-headquartered defense contractor, Halliburton, into U.S. federal court with claims that the company stiffed them for hundreds of millions of dollars after they provided essential services in the war effort.

USA: US Army Criticised Over Halliburton Contract
The Guardian
July 22nd, 2004

USA: Halliburton Cuts Off KBR Ex-Boss
BBC
June 19th, 2004

Iraq: The Paper Trail. Did Cheney Okay a Deal?
by Timothy J. Burger and Adam Zagorin
May 30th, 2004

Houston, We Have a Problem
Produced by CorpWatch and Global Exchange
May 18th, 2004
Halliburton, the largest oil-and-gas services company in the world, is also one of the most controversial companies in the United States. The company has been the number one financial beneficiary of the war against Iraq, raking in some $18 billion in contracts to rebuild the country's oil industry and service the U.S. troops in Iraq. It has also been accused of more fraud, waste, and corruption than any other Iraq contractor. This report details Halliburton's track record.

Cheney, Halliburton and the Spoils of War
by Lee Drutman and Charlie CrayCitizen Works
April 4th, 2003
Why Dick Cheney's wartime conflicts of interest are among the most troubling in Washington.

Cheney's Close Ties to Brown and Root
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
March 20th, 2003
Halliburton, Brown and Root's parent company, is a Fortune 500 construction corporation working primarily for the oil industry. From 1962 to 1972 the Pentagon paid the company tens of millions of dollars to work in South Vietnam, where they built roads, landing strips, harbors, and military bases from the demilitarized zone to the Mekong Delta. The company was one of the main contractors hired to construct the Diego Garcia air base in the Indian Ocean, according to Pentagon military histories.

Halliburton Makes a Killing on Iraq War
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
March 20th, 2003
CorpWatch has learned that VP Cheney's former company has a $multi-million contract servicing troops in Kuwait. This special series looks at how Halliburton profits from the Iraq war, now that bombs are falling on Baghdad.

US: In Tough Times, a Company Finds Profits in Terror War
by Jeff Gerth and Don Van Natta Jr.New York Times
July 12th, 2002
The Halliburton Company, the Dallas oil services company bedeviled lately by an array of accounting and business issues, is benefiting very directly from the United States efforts to combat terrorism.From building cells for detainees at Guantnamo Bay in Cuba to feeding American troops in Uzbekistan, the Pentagon is increasingly relying on a unit of Halliburton called KBR, sometimes referred to as Kellogg Brown & Root.

The War on Terrorism's Gravy Train
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
May 2nd, 2002
The U.S. military has always relied on private contractors for basic services, but today nearly 10 percent of the emergency U.S. army operations overseas are contracted out to unaccountable private corporations.

Displaying 75-87 of 87  
< Prev  
« First Page 
« Show Complete List »