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Iraq: Bay Area civilian vanishes in Iraq
by Colin FreemanSan Francisco Chronicle
November 11th, 2003
A Moss Beach man working as a contractor for the U.S. Army in Iraq has mysteriously disappeared while driving along an isolated road north of the country's violence-plagued Sunni Triangle.

BAE System's Dirty Dealings
by Sasha LilleySpecial to CorpWatch
November 11th, 2003
BAE Systems has been accused of operating a $33.4 million slush fund to procure prostitutes, sports cars, and other enticements in connection with the biggest transaction in UK history -- the Al-Yamamah arms-for-oil deal with the Saudi royal family.

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U.S. Contractors Reap the Windfalls of Post-War Reconstruction
by Maud Beelman, Center for Public IntegrityCenter for Public Integrity
October 30th, 2003
More than 70 American companies and individuals have won up to $8 billion in contracts for work in postwar Iraq and Afghanistan over the last two years, according to a new study by the Center for Public Integrity.

Iraq: Contract Extended for Halliburton
by Larry MargasakThe Associated Press
October 29th, 2003
Vice President Dick Cheney's former company will retain a no-bid contract in Iraq longer than expected, the Bush administration said Wednesday, blaming sabotage of oil facilities for delays in replacement contracts.

US: The $87 billion money pit
by Rod Nordland and Michael HirshNewsweek
October 27th, 2003
Iraqis like to point out that after the 1991 war, Saddam restored the badly destroyed electric grid in only three months. Some six months after Bush declared an end to major hostilities, a much more ambitious and costly American effort has yet to get to that point. It is only in recent weeks that the Coalition amped up to the power-generation level that Saddam achieved last March-4,400 megawatts for the country (though it's since dropped back). True, Saddam didn't have a guerrilla war to contend with, and his power infrastructure was in much better shape than the Americans found it. But he also had far fewer resources.

Iraq Reconstructing Abuses
Project On Government Oversight
October 27th, 2003
A new report released today by the Project On Government Oversight (POGO) addresses the unprecedented attention given to Iraq reconstruction contracts awarded by the federal government. "This Administration has taken full of advantage of gaping loopholes that make the federal government's contracting ripe for abuse," said POGO Senior Investigator Scott Amey.

The report, Federal Contracting and Iraq Reconstruction, summarizes how changes in federal procurement over the past decade have gradually weakened oversight of contracting and includes suggested reforms.


US: Uncle Sam Keeps SAIC On Call For Top Tasks
by Scott ShaneBaltimore Sun
October 26th, 2003
While Science Applications International Corporation is dwarfed by such defense giants as Bethesda-based Lockheed Martin, no contractor does a more mind-boggling variety of jobs for the government. None is entrusted with more sensitive tasks. Yet few Americans have heard of the San Diego-based company, whose forgettable name and low public profile have long been a draw for publicity-shy intelligence agencies.

World: Donors Promise About $37.5 Billion to Rebuild Iraq
Reuters
October 24th, 2003
Governments and international agencies pledged around $37.5 billion in aid and loans to help rebuild war-ravaged Iraq on Friday as the results of a donors' conference came in well above initial low expectations.

Leaked Halliburton Memo Promotes 'Spin' Campaign
MoveOn.org
October 24th, 2003
The CEO of Halliburton, David Lesar, sent a memo to company employees last Friday (one of whom made it available to Misleader.org) urging each of them to send a letter to local newspaper editors, so we can be heard over those who are distorting our efforts.

Iraq: The Pentagon's Private Corps
by Julian BrookesMotherJones.com
October 22nd, 2003
Washington has long outsourced work to private firms. What's new is the size and variety of contracts being doled out, particularly by the Pentagon. Private military companies now do more than simply build airplanes -- they maintain those planes on the battlefield and even fly them; construct detention camps in Guantanamo Bay, pilot armed reconnaissance planes and helicopter gunships to eradicate coca crops in Colombia; and operate the intelligence and communications systems at the U.S. Northern Command in Colorado -- work that brings the various companies an estimated $100 billion a year.

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