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Logistics : Displaying 22-41 of 59


US: The Rise and Fall of a War Profiteer
by Sarah AndersonAlterNet
July 13th, 2006
Bulletproof vest maker David H. Brooks' reign as America’s most ostentatious war profiteer does appear to be over. On July 10, the DHB Board of Directors issued a terse statement to the effect that Brooks had been put on indefinite “administrative leave” pending the outcome of unspecified investigations.

Blood, Sweat & Tears: Asia’s Poor Build U.S. Bases in Iraq
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
October 3rd, 2005
Thousands of low-wage Asian laborers are traveling to Iraq to work for U.S. military contractors like First Kuwaiti and Prime Projects International in the hope of sending money home to their families. Trapped and exploited under inhuman conditions, many of them are now fleeing the country to save their lives.

Halliburton Hearing Unearths New Abuse
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
June 27th, 2005
"Misplaced" portable military bases, thousand-dollar VCRs, and expired food are only a few of the new charges that have been brought against the most powerful military contractor in Iraq.

US: Little Big Companies
by Michael SchererMother Jones Magazine
How did corporations like Halliburton get millions in government contracts designated for small minority businesses?

IRAQ: Four Halliburton Workers from U.S. Killed
Associated Press
December 22nd, 2004
Two Texas men and two others from Oregon and Alabama were identified Wednesday as the four Halliburton Co. employees killed in the attack at a military base in Iraq, a strike that is among the deadliest for the Houston-based contractor since its involvement there.

UN: Board Cites U.S. Contractor in Iraq
by Colum LynchWashington Post
December 15th, 2004

“Contract Meals Disaster" for Iraqi Prisoners
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
December 9th, 2004
New evidence suggests that the Abu Ghraib prisoners were subjected not only to torture and psychological abuse, they were underfed, malnourished and made to eat food so bad it inspired riots. A little-known private contractor, run by an American civilian, is said to be to blame.

IRAQ: Silence Surrounds Fates of Contractors
by David IvanovichHouston Chronicle
November 21st, 2004
Halliburton Co. truck drivers Tim Bell and Bill Bradley disappeared April 9 when their convoy was attacked west of Baghdad. The Army has conducted an investigation into the ambush, but the report is classified. Pentagon officials refused to discuss its contents, directing questions to Halliburton. The company referred questions back to the Pentagon.

Houston, We Have a Problem
Produced by CorpWatch and Global Exchange
May 18th, 2004
Halliburton, the largest oil-and-gas services company in the world, is also one of the most controversial companies in the United States. The company has been the number one financial beneficiary of the war against Iraq, raking in some $18 billion in contracts to rebuild the country's oil industry and service the U.S. troops in Iraq. It has also been accused of more fraud, waste, and corruption than any other Iraq contractor. This report details Halliburton's track record.

Private Contractors and Torture at Abu Ghraib
by Pratap Chatterjee and A.C. ThompsonSpecial to CorpWatch
May 7th, 2004
Two private military contractors are being investigated for their role in torture allegations at the Abu Ghraib prison, Iraq: CACI from Arlington, Virginia, and Titan of San Diego, California.

Titan's Translators in Trouble
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
May 6th, 2004
Titan corporation of San Diego, California, one of the two companies accused of complicity in the prison abuse scandal in Abu Ghraib, Iraq, is currently facing numerous federal investigations for work done in Iraq and around the world.

IRAQ: 10 US Contractors Penalized
by Matt KelleyAssociated Press
April 26th, 2004
Ten companies with billions of dollars in U.S. contracts for Iraq reconstruction have paid more than $300 million in penalties since 2000 to resolve allegations of bid rigging, fraud, delivery of faulty military parts and environmental damage.

Iraq: Families of Hostages Say They're Being Kept in Dark
by Bill MurphyHouston Chronicle
April 25th, 2004
Family members of KBR employees taken hostage by insurgents in Iraq say they are still being kept in the dark about their status

Iraq: Iraqis Investigate Halliburton over Allegations of Bribery
by Clayton HirstLondon Independent
April 25th, 2004
The probe centres on allegations that staff working for the Houston-based company took bribes for awarding sub-contracts in Iraq.

Iraq: Trade Fair Postponed Over Security Fears
by Joshua Chaffin and Salamander DavoudiFinancial Times
April 1st, 2004
The deteriorating security situation in Iraq has prompted the postponement of a US-led trade fair aimed at accelerating reconstruction in the country amid heightening concerns about the safety of foreign civilians working there. Organisers of Destination Baghdad Expo, that was due to begin on Monday, postponed the event following the gruesome killings on Wednesday of four western contract workers in the city of Falluja.

Iraq: Rebuilding Plan Reviewed
by Jackie Spinner and Mary Pat FlahertyWashington Post
March 31st, 2004
The new inspector general of the U.S.-led interim authority in Iraq reported yesterday that though he is just beginning his own audits of reconstruction spending, he is concerned about the oversight of spending and control of cash.

US: Former McKesson CFO Indicted in Fraud
by Henry K. LeeSan Francisco Chronicle
March 31st, 2004
The former chief financial officer of San Francisco health care giant McKesson Corp. was indicted Tuesday by a federal grand jury for his role in a huge criminal securities fraud that wiped out $9 billion of shareholder value five years ago.

Iraq: Parsons Corp. Wins $900 Million Contract
Reuters
March 30th, 2004
California's Parsons Corp., one of the most active U.S. companies in Iraq, said on Tuesday it won a contract worth up to $900 million from the U.S. military for security and justice work in Iraq. The privately-owned engineering and construction company said the latest deal includes the restoration and construction of bases for the Iraqi security forces, police stations, border control stations, fire stations, courthouses and prisons.

Iraq: SAIC Pays DOD Settlement
by Rachel SamsBaltimore Business Journal
March 25th, 2004
Defense contractor Science Applications International Corp. has agreed to pay $484,500 to settle allegations it violated the False Claims Act when designing a computer system program for the U.S. Department of Defense.

US: Report Finds Halliburton Violated Contracting Rules
by Seth BorensteinKnight Ridder
March 11th, 2004
Halliburton, the big contractor that's won the lion's share of government contracts to rebuild Iraq, significantly and systematically violated federal contracting rules by providing inaccurate and incomplete information about its own costs, according to a special report by Defense Department auditors.