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Halliburton : Displaying 56-75 of 75


IRAQ: Halliburton Gave Troops Foul Water, Workers Say
Reuters
January 23rd, 2006
A Halliburton Co. subsidiary provided water to U.S. troops at a camp in Iraq that was twice as contaminated as water from the Euphrates River, former employees of the company said on Monday.

US: Ex-Halliburton Iraq Worker Gets 15-Month Jail Sentence
by Matt DailyReuters
November 18th, 2005
A former Halliburton Co. worker was sentenced on Friday to 15 months in prison after pleading guilty in federal court in Illinois to taking more than $110,000 in kickbacks from an Iraqi company in 2004.

US: Immigrants Often Unpaid for Katrina Work
by  Justin PritchardAssociated Press
November 5th, 2005
A pattern is emerging as the cleanup of Mississippi's Gulf Coast morphs into its multibillion-dollar reconstruction: Come payday, untold numbers of Hispanic immigrant laborers are being stiffed.

US: Suspected Illegal Workers Found at Halliburton Job Site
by Griff WitteThe Washington Post
October 22nd, 2005
Federal agents have identified 10 suspected illegal immigrants working at a naval base near New Orleans where the Halliburton Co. subsidiary Kellogg Brown & Root is leading hurricane reconstruction, according to a spokeswoman for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

US: Cheney's Halliburton Options Up 3,281% Last Year
The Raw Story
October 11th, 2005

US: Katrina work goes to officials who led Iraq effort
by Adam EntousReuters
October 6th, 2005
Top officials who managed U.S. reconstruction projects in Iraq have been hired by some of the same big companies that received those contracts and which are now involved in a rush of deals to rebuild after Hurricane Katrina.

Blood, Sweat & Tears: Asia’s Poor Build U.S. Bases in Iraq
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
October 3rd, 2005
Thousands of low-wage Asian laborers are traveling to Iraq to work for U.S. military contractors like First Kuwaiti and Prime Projects International in the hope of sending money home to their families. Trapped and exploited under inhuman conditions, many of them are now fleeing the country to save their lives.

US: Auditors investigate Katrina contracts
by Hope YenAssociated Press
September 22nd, 2005
Government auditors are questioning whether several multimillion-dollar Katrina contracts” including one involving a subsidiary of Houston-based Halliburton Co.” invite abuse because they are open-ended and not clearly defined.

Hurricane Katrina and Climate Justice
by Joshua KarlinerSpecial to CorpWatch
September 12th, 2005
For nearly five years George Bush has infuriated much of the world by refusing to take action on global warming. Instead, he has called for more study. In a way, he got what he wanted with Hurricane Katrina.

Hallliburton Wins New $4.9Billion Iraq Contract
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
July 6th, 2005
With little fanfare and no public announcement, the U.S. Army quietly awarded $4.972 billion in new work to Halliburton on May 1 to support the United States military occupation of Iraq.

Halliburton Hearing Unearths New Abuse
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
June 27th, 2005
"Misplaced" portable military bases, thousand-dollar VCRs, and expired food are only a few of the new charges that have been brought against the most powerful military contractor in Iraq.

Adding Insult to Injury
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
May 24th, 2005
Many Halliburton contractors leave Iraq with debilitating injuries and deep psychological scars. Then they return home only to find that the insurance they need to rebuild their lives is out of reach.

Houston: We Still Have a Problem
CorpWatch
May 17th, 2005
In a alternative annual report on the company, released today by CorpWatch, titled "Houston: We Still Have a Problem," Halliburton's real 2004 track record is revealed. The report details everything from the company's unwillingness to prevent bribery, fraud, and corruption within its workforce to its inability to take proper precautions to protect its employees in Iraq.

Houston, We Still Have A Problem
by Andrea Buffa and Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
May 16th, 2005
This week, CorpWatch publishes a special alternative annual report on Halliburton. From bribery, fraud, and corruption in Iraq, to the undermining of US government regulations that protect drinking water at home, we take a closer look at this controversial company's track record in 2004.

USA: US Army Criticised Over Halliburton Contract
The Guardian
July 22nd, 2004

Cheney, Halliburton and the Spoils of War
by Lee Drutman and Charlie CrayCitizen Works
April 4th, 2003
Why Dick Cheney's wartime conflicts of interest are among the most troubling in Washington.

Cheney's Close Ties to Brown and Root
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
March 20th, 2003
Halliburton, Brown and Root's parent company, is a Fortune 500 construction corporation working primarily for the oil industry. From 1962 to 1972 the Pentagon paid the company tens of millions of dollars to work in South Vietnam, where they built roads, landing strips, harbors, and military bases from the demilitarized zone to the Mekong Delta. The company was one of the main contractors hired to construct the Diego Garcia air base in the Indian Ocean, according to Pentagon military histories.

Halliburton Makes a Killing on Iraq War
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
March 20th, 2003
CorpWatch has learned that VP Cheney's former company has a $multi-million contract servicing troops in Kuwait. This special series looks at how Halliburton profits from the Iraq war, now that bombs are falling on Baghdad.

US: In Tough Times, a Company Finds Profits in Terror War
by Jeff Gerth and Don Van Natta Jr.New York Times
July 12th, 2002
The Halliburton Company, the Dallas oil services company bedeviled lately by an array of accounting and business issues, is benefiting very directly from the United States efforts to combat terrorism.From building cells for detainees at Guantnamo Bay in Cuba to feeding American troops in Uzbekistan, the Pentagon is increasingly relying on a unit of Halliburton called KBR, sometimes referred to as Kellogg Brown & Root.

The War on Terrorism's Gravy Train
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
May 2nd, 2002
The U.S. military has always relied on private contractors for basic services, but today nearly 10 percent of the emergency U.S. army operations overseas are contracted out to unaccountable private corporations.

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