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Globalization : Displaying 70-79 of 79


The Struggle for a Deglobalized World
by Walden BelloFocus on the Global South
September 6th, 2000
In the mid-nineties, the WTO had been sold to the global public as the lynchpin of a multilateral system of economic governance that would provide the necessary rules to facilitate the growth of global trade and the spread of its beneficial effects.

Activists from the Developing World See D.C. Events as a Watershed in Global Solidarity
by Julie LightSpecial to CorpWatch
April 17th, 2000
If you ask a Mexican farmer, Indian civil servant, Filipina garment worker, Bolivian miner or South African student what structural adjustment is, chances are they would be able to explain IMF and World Bank mandated belt tightening because their lives have been touched by it.

The World Bank Takes More Than it Gives
by Julie LightCorpWatch
April 14th, 2000
Dr. Vineeta Gupta is a physician and human rights activist based in Punjab, India. She has focused her efforts on World Bank efforts to privatize healthcare in Punjab. According to Dr. Gupta, the result of World Bank policies has not been greater access to healthcare.

Where was the Color in Seattle?
by Elizabeth (Betita) MartinezColorlines
February 1st, 2000
In the vast acreage of published analysis about the splendid victory over the World Trade Organization last November 29-December 3, it is almost impossible to find anyone wondering why the 40-50,000 demonstrators were overwhelmingly Anglo.

The Historic Significance of Seattle
by Vandana ShivaResearch Foundation for Science, Technology and Ecology
December 10th, 1999
The failure of the WTO Ministerial meeting in Seattle was a historic watershed, in more than one way. Firstly, it has demonstrated that globalisation is not an inevitable phenomena which must be accepted at all costs but a political project which can be responded to politically.

Engendering Change
by Julie LightSpecial to CorpWatch
June 26th, 1999
For women working in Mexican assembly plants, known as maquiladoras, insisting on their legal rights takes what are colloquially referred to as cojones. It indicates that Mexico's low wage feminine labor force may not be as docile as foreign employers would like to believe. It also is a harbinger of an incipient movement inside Mexico's expanding export-processing sector.

Tijuana Police Defy Court Protection of Maquiladora Strike
by David BaconSpecial to CorpWatch
May 16th, 1999
TIJUANA -- For two weeks, Tijuana has teetered on the brink of official lawlessness, as city and state police continue to defy Baja California's legal system. Raul Ramirez, member of the Baja California Academy of Human Rights, warned last week that ''the state is in danger of violating the Constitution and the Federal Labor Law... as it succumbs to the temptation to use force.''

MEXICO: Standing up for Health Rights on the Job
Special to CorpWatch
May 1st, 1999
First hand accounts of two workers who sued a San Diego-based medical manufacturer after a workplace accident.

MEXICO: University Professors Photos Draw the Wrath of Border Industrialists
by Julie LightSpecial to CorpWatch
April 29th, 1999
It wasn't just the politically provocative photographs that got Fred Lonidier's exhibit at Tijuana's public university taken down. It was the fact that he had the audacity to leaflet maquiladora workers outside the factory gates and invite them to the gallery that got his show yanked.

MITSUBISHI: The Most Environmentally Destructive Corporate Force on Earth
by Joshua KarlinerCorpWatch
December 1st, 1997
The best known, most prestigious, and largest keiretsu, is the Mitsubishi Group of companies. Given the size and reach of its diverse activities, and due to the fact that it is more heavily focused in polluting industrial sectors than other keiretsu, the Mitsubishi Group may well be the single most environmentally destructive corporate force on Earth.

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