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News Articles : Displaying 98-113 of 113


Equatorial Guinea: Mercenary Tells How Coup Went Wrong
by Tom WalkerSunday Times (London)
March 28th, 2004
A former SAS soldier languishing in a Zimbabwean jail has confessed to numerous failures in his attempt to lead a group of mercenaries in overthrowing the president of Equatorial Guinea. In a 13-page handwritten statement, Simon Mann describes how he hoped to convince the Harare authorities to let him and his men pass through Zimbabwe.

US: Carlyle Stands to Profit from Disaster
by David LazarusSan Francisco Chronicle
March 21st, 2004
The Washington investment firm, run by a who's who of Republican heavyweights, including former Secretary of State James Baker and former Defense Secretary Frank Carlucci, has put money into about 300 different companies and properties. Those investments include United Defense Industries, a maker of combat vehicles, naval guns and missile launchers; and Sippican, a maker of submarine systems and countermeasures to protect warships

Ivory Coast: British Mercenaries Follow Diamond Money
by James AstillGuardian (London)
February 22nd, 2004
Executive Outcomes drew international attention to the industry, worth an estimated 30bn a year in the late 90s, by fighting for the besieged governments of Angola and Sierra Leone. In Sierra Leone the British mercenary company Sandline International broke a UN arms embargo, allegedly with British government approval.

Iraq: Start-up Company with Connections
by Knut RoyceNew York Newsday
February 15th, 2004
U.S. authorities in Iraq have awarded more than $400 million in contracts to a start-up company that has extensive family and, according to court documents, business ties to Ahmed Chalabi, the Pentagon favorite on the Iraqi Governing Council.

US: Contractors Complain of TSA Limits
by Sara Kehaulani GooWashington Post
November 21st, 2003
A pilot program to test the effectiveness of privately employed screeners at U.S. airports is yielding few security innovations or cost savings because of constraints imposed by the Transportation Security Administration, government investigators and private contractors said.

Iraq: Some of Army's Civilian Contractors Are No-Shows
by David WoodNewhouse News Service
July 31st, 2003
U.S. troops in Iraq suffered through months of unnecessarily poor living conditions because some civilian contractors hired by the Army for logistics support failed to show up, Army officers said.

USA: Spying for Fun and Profit
by Kari LydersenAlternet
May 28th, 2003
Survelliance technologies raise serious questions about invasions of privacy and violations of civil liberties. They also cost a lot of money. Taxpayers fund this massively beefed up security. Private corporations and even individuals are also paying large amounts to boost their own security procedures in light of the war on terrorism. Naturally, someone is also profiting off this boom.

IRAQ: Thousands of Private Contractors Support U.S. Forces in Persian Gulf
by Kenneth BredemeierWashington Post
March 3rd, 2003
Private contractors are sending thousands of technical experts to the Persian Gulf region. They operate communications systems, repair helicopters, fix weapons systems and link the computers with the troops to command centers.

ECUADOR: Farmers Fight DynCorp's Chemwar on the Amazon
by Jeffrey St. Clair and Alexander CockburnCounterpunch
February 27th, 2002
The International Labor Rights Fund has filed suit in US federal court on behalf of 10,000 Ecuadorian peasant farmers and Amazonian Indians charging DynCorp with torture, infanticide and wrongful death for its role in the aerial spraying of highly toxic pesticides in the Amazonian jungle, along the border of Ecuador and Colombia.

US: Bush Bans Unions at Justice Department
by Steven GreenhouseThe New York Times
January 16th, 2002
Invoking security concerns, President Bush has issued an executive order barring union representation at United States attorneys' offices and at four other agencies in the Justice Department.

US: DynCorp Disgrace
by Kelly Patricia O'MearaInsight Magazine
January 14th, 2002
Middle-aged men having sex with 12- to 15-year-olds was too much for Ben Johnston, a hulking 6-foot-5-inch Texan, and more than a year ago he blew the whistle on his employer, DynCorp, a U.S. contracting company doing business in Bosnia.

US: 'New War' May Shift Defense Spending
by Gary GentileAssociated Press
October 1st, 2001
In the nation's "new kind of war" on terrorism, defense spending is likely to focus as much on information and surveillance as bombs and bullets.

Saudi Arabia: Royal Family Gets Quiet Help From U.S. Firm With Connections
by Charles J HanleyAssociated Press
March 22nd, 1997
Vinnell first came to Saudi Arabia 22 years ago on a "one-time" training mission. Today, under a Pentagon-supervised contract, its military specialists are permanent on-scene consultants throughout the National Guard. Three hundred Vinnell experts, almost all U.S. military veterans, many recently discharged, instruct Saudi guardsmen in the latest weaponry, supervise supply operations, teach brigade-level tactics, help operate a hospital and are updating the Guard's data processing, among other functions.

Turkey: U.S. Businessman Slain; Terror Group Claims Responsibility
by Ahmet BalanNew York Times
March 22nd, 1991
Gunmen today killed a former U.S. Air Force officer working for an American company in Turkey, police said. A Marxist terrorist group claimed responsibility. It was the third time in two months the group - Dev Sol, or Revolutionary Left - said it was behind armed attacks on Americans.

Saudi Arabia: This Gun For Hire
by Kim Willenson with Nicholas C. Profitt in Beirut and Lloyd Norman in WashingtonNewsweek
February 24th, 1975
In the aptly named Los Angeles suburb of Alhambra last week, a private contractor was recruiting a ragtag army of Vietnam veterans for a paradoxical mission: to train Saudi Arabian troops to defend the very oil fields that Henry Kissinger recently warned the U.S. might one day have to invade.

Saudi Arabia: Vinnell Adds Saudis To Its Trainee Roster
Business Week
February 24th, 1975
Vinnell Corp., has a $77-million contract to train Saudi Arabian forces to defend Saudi oil fields, but the Pentagon sidesteppped any probing questions about the contract, shunting them to the State Dept., which had approved it.

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