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AFGHANISTAN: Iraq Lessons Ignored at Kabul Power Plant
by Pratap ChatterjeeInter Press News Service
February 4th, 2010
A diesel-fueled power plant, nearing completion just outside Kabul, demonstrates that the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and its contractors have failed to learn lessons from identical mistakes in Iraq, despite clearly signposted advice from oversight agencies.

US/KUWAIT: Settlement possible in military contractor fraud case
by Bill RankinAtlanta Journal-Constitution
January 29th, 2010
Kuwaiti firm Agility (formerly Public Warehousing) indicted here for overcharging the Army on an $8.5 billion contract is negotiating a possible settlement with the Justice Department. On Nov. 9, a federal grand jury in Atlanta indicted the firm on charges it gouged the U.S. government by overcharging on its contract to supply food to American troops in Iraq.

IRAQ: The Pentagon Garrisons the Gulf: As Washington Talks Iraq Withdrawal, the Pentagon Builds Up Bases in the Region
by Nick
November 22nd, 2009
Despite recent large-scale insurgent suicide bombings that have killed scores of civilians and the fact that well over 100,000 U.S. troops are still deployed in that country, coverage of the U.S. war in Iraq has been largely replaced in the mainstream press by the (previously) "forgotten war" in Afghanistan. Getting out of Iraq, however, doesn't mean getting out of the Middle East.

AFGHANISTAN: Paying Off the Warlords, Anatomy of an Afghan Culture of Corruption
by Pratap
November 17th, 2009
Among the dozens of businesses with lucrative Afghan and U.S. taxpayer-financed reconstruction deals are two extremely well connected companies -- Ghazanfar and Zahid Walid -- that helped to swell the election coffers of President Hamid Karzai as well as the family business of his running mate, the country's new vice president, warlord Mohammed Qasim Fahim.

US: Contracting Boom Could Fizzle Out
by Dana HedgpethWashington Post
April 7th, 2009
The surge in the U.S. military contracting workforce would ebb under Defense Secretary Gates's budget proposal as the Pentagon moves to replace private workers with full-time civil servants. The move could affect companies such as CACI and SAIC. "We are right-sizing the defense acquisition workforce so we can improve our contract oversight and get a better deal for the taxpayers," said the Pentagon's director of defense procurement and acquisition policy.

US: Company Gets Pentagon Contract Despite Death Inquiries
by Associated PressNew York Times
February 7th, 2009
Private military contractor KBR has been awarded a $35 million Pentagon contract involving major electrical work even though it is under criminal investigation in the electrocution deaths of at least two American soldiers in Iraq.

US/AFGHANISTAN: Short-staffed USAID tries to keep pace
by Ken DilanianUSA Today
February 1st, 2009
Like other government functions, U.S. foreign aid and reconstruction largely has been privatized. USAID now turns to contractors to fulfill its basic mission of fighting poverty and promoting democracy. CorpWatch's 2006 "Afghanistan, Inc" documented problems with Chemonics and other contractors operating in Afghanistan.

US/IRAQ: Indiana guardsmen sue defense contractor KBR
by Farah StockmanBoston Globe
December 4th, 2008
Sixteen Indiana national guardsmen filed a lawsuit yesterday against military contractor KBR. The complaint alleges that several reservists contracted respiratory system tumors and skin rashes after guarding reconstruction work at the Qarmat Ali treatment plant, strewn with the toxin chromium dichromate.

KATRINA: U.S. Raids New Orleans Agency in Scandal Over a Housing Cleanup Program
by ADAM NOSSITERThe New York Times
August 11th, 2008
Federal investigators on Monday raided the downtown offices of a city-chartered nonprofit agency accused of abusing a federally financed program that was created to clean up houses damaged by Hurricane Katrina.

IRAQ: Electrical Risks at Bases in Iraq Worse Than Previously Said
by JAMES RISENThe New York Times
July 18th, 2008
Shoddy electrical work by private contractors on United States military bases in Iraq is widespread and dangerous, causing more deaths and injuries from fires and shocks than the Pentagon has acknowledged, according to internal Army documents.

KATRINA: Audit Faults KBR's Repairs of Hurricane Damage
by Derek KravitzThe Washington Post
June 18th, 2008
Efforts by defense contractor KBR to repair hurricane-damaged Navy facilities were deemed shoddy and substandard, and one technical adviser alleged that the federal government "certainly paid twice" for many KBR projects because of "design and workmanship deficiencies," the Pentagon's inspector general reported in an audit released yesterday.

AFGHANISTAN: Missing: The £5bn aid needed to rebuild lives
March 25th, 2008
Vast sums of aid are lost in corporate profits of contractors and sub-contractors, which can be as high as 50 per cent on a single contract. A vast amount of aid is absorbed by high salaries, with generous allowances, and other costs of expatriates working for consulting firms and contractors.

US: U.S. paid $32M for Iraqi base that wasn't built
by Matt KelleyUSA Today
December 14th, 2007
The U.S. military paid a Florida company nearly $32 million to build barracks and offices for Iraqi army units even though nothing was ever built, Pentagon investigators reported.

AFGHANISTAN: NATO Airstrike Kills 14 Afghans
by Abdul Waheed WafaNew York Times
November 29th, 2007
A NATO airstrike killed 14 laborers working for an Afghan road construction company that had been contracted by the United States Army Corps of Engineers.

GERMANY: Get Rich or Die Trying
by John Goetz and Conny NeumannDer Spiegel
November 12th, 2007
Germany companies send mercenaries to Iraq.

US: Louisiana Charges Price Fixing by Insurers
New York Times
November 7th, 2007
The Louisiana attorney general sues the state’s largest property insurance companies for engaging in an elaborate price-fixing scheme.

IRELAND: Irish subsidiary implicated in Saddam fraud
by Arthur BeesleyThe Irish Times
November 1st, 2007
The Irish subsidiary of US industrial group Ingersoll-Rand paid a $53,919 (EUR 37,235) "kickback" to Saddam Hussein's regime in Iraq in an effort to secure a UN contract, US regulators have claimed.

US: Protest Leads Army to Reconsider Big Contract
by Dana HedgpethWashington Post
November 1st, 2007
One of the biggest military contracts to house, feed and provide other services to U.S. military troops in Iraq, Afghanistan and Kuwait may be canceled and renegotiated after the Government Accountability Office said yesterday that it upheld a protest from two teams that lost the bid.

US: Rice Says ‘Hole’ in U.S. Law Shields Contractors in Iraq
by John M. BroderNY Times
October 26th, 2007
Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice conceded on Thursday that there was a “hole” in United States law that had allowed Blackwater USA employees and other armed contractors in Iraq to escape legal jeopardy for crimes possibly committed there.

US: Houston Businessman Is Key Figure In U.S. Probe of Iraq Food Contracts
by Glenn R. SimpsonWall Street Journal
October 18th, 2007
As federal authorities probe the web of food suppliers for U.S. troops in Iraq, one focus of scrutiny is a Lebanese-American businessman indicted for allegedly inflating food prices with fraudulent bills.

US: Food Companies Face U.S. Probe Over Iraq Deals
by Glen R. SimpsonWall Street Journal
October 16th, 2007
Prominent American food companies are under scrutiny in a federal probe of possible fraud and corruption in the military's food-supply operations for the Iraq war.

US: The People vs. the Profiteers
by David RoseVanity Fair
October 4th, 2007
Americans working in Iraq for Halliburton spin-off KBR have been outraged by the massive fraud they saw there. Dozens are suing the giant military contractor, on the taxpayers' behalf. Whose side is the Justice Department on?

US: Billions over Baghdad; The Spoils of War
by Donald L. Barlett and James B. SteeleVanity Fair
October 1st, 2007
Between April 2003 and June 2004, $12 billion in U.S. currency--much of it belonging to the Iraqi people--was shipped from the Federal Reserve to Baghdad, where it was dispensed by the Coalition Provisional Authority. Incredibly, at least $9 billion has gone missing, unaccounted for, in a frenzy of mismanagement and greed.

US: Graft in Military Contracts Spread From Base
by Ginger Thompson and Eric SchmitNew York Times
September 24th, 2007
A US major is arrested in relation to a bribery scheme involving companies seeking military contracts.

US: U.S. probes Blackwater weapons shipments
by Joseph NeffNews & Observer (North Carolina)
September 22nd, 2007
The U.S. government is investigating whether private military contractor Blackwater USA, blamed for the deaths of 11 Iraqis in Baghdad on Sunday, has been shipping unlicensed automatic weapons and military goods to Iraq.

US: Head of firm paid to track Iraq spending investigated
by Matt KelleyUSA Today
September 21st, 2007
The head of a firm hired to audit Iraqi reconstruction spending is under investigation for violation of conflict of interest laws.

US: Evoking Vietnam clash, Wisconsin students to protest Halliburton visit
by Ryan J. Foley, APHouston Chronicle
September 19th, 2007
Students at Madison protest against Halliburton Co. recruiters, evoking memories of a 1967 protest of Dow, which made napalm for the US military.

IRAQ: Big oil’s waiting game over Iraq’s reserves
by Ed Crooks and Sheila McNultyFinancial Times
September 19th, 2007
Oil companies face a dilemma in Iraq over whether to wait for a new oil law which will give them a legal framework in which to operate or to sign agreements now with the Kurdistan Regional Government at the risk of sullying relations with Baghdad and the rest of the country.

IRAQ: Will Iraq Kick Out Blackwater?
by Adam Zagorin and Brian BennettTIME Magazine
September 17th, 2007
TIME has obtained an incident report prepared by the U.S. government describing a fire fight Sunday in Baghdad in which at least eight Iraqis were reported killed and 13 wounded. The loss of life has provoked anger in Baghdad, where the Interior Ministry has suspended Blackwater's license to operate around the country.

US: Army to examine Iraq contracts
by Richard LardnerAssociated Press
August 29th, 2007
The Army will examine as many as 18,000 contracts awarded over the past four years to support U.S. forces in Iraq to determine how many are tainted by waste, fraud and abuse.

US: As Iraq Costs Soar, Contractors Earn Record Profits
by Eli CliftonInter Press Service News Agency
August 2nd, 2007
In a report to lawmakers earlier this week, the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office found that the war in Iraq could cost U.S. taxpayers over a trillion dollars when the long-term costs of caring for soldiers wounded in action, military and economic aid for the Iraqi government, and ongoing costs associated with the 190,000 troops stationed in Iraq are totaled up.

US: Sale of KBR Bolsters Profit at Halliburton
by Bloomberg NewsThe New York Times
July 24th, 2007
Halliburton, the oil field contractor, said second-quarter net income more than doubled on a gain from selling its government services and construction subsidiary, KBR.

US: Contractors fume over slow FEMA checks
by Becky BohrerAssociated Press
July 18th, 2007

US: Cited firm gets big security contract; Violations won't sour $323 million deal
by Allen Powell IIWest Bank Bureau
July 15th, 2007
A Hammond security company, Inner Parish Security Corp., which admitted to several "serious" state violations, including hiring an underage officer, has been awarded a large federal contract to provide private security officers at FEMA trailer parks in metro New Orleans.

US: Katrina Ice Being Melted After 2 Years
Associated Press
July 14th, 2007
After nearly two years, thousands of truck miles and $12.5 million in storage costs, the federal government is getting rid of thousands of pounds of ice it had sent south to help Katrina victims, then north when it determined much of the ice wasn't needed.

US: Former KBR employee pleads guilty in Kuwaiti kickback case
by Brett ClantonHouston Chronicle
July 13th, 2007
A former KBR employee pleads guilty to Kuwaiti kickback charges.

US: Contractors Back From Iraq Suffer Trauma From Battle
by James RisenThe New York Times
July 5th, 2007
Contractors who have worked in Iraq are returning home with the same kinds of combat-related mental health problems that afflict United States military personnel, according to contractors, industry officials and mental health experts.

IRAQ: Blackwater Blues for Dead Contractors' Families
by Bill BerkowitzInter Press Service News Agency
June 29th, 2007
The families of four Blackwater employees who were killed in Iraq have filed a lawsuit that accuses the world's largest private security firm of negligence; Blackwater is suing back.

IRAQ: Audit of KBR Iraq Contract Faults Records For Fuel, Food; U.S. Says It Will Increase Monitoring in Baghdad
by Dana HedgpethThe Washington Post
June 24th, 2007
KBR, the government contracting firm formerly under Halliburton, did not keep accurate records of gasoline distribution, put its employees in living spaces that may be larger than warranted and served meals that appeared to cost $4.5 million more than necessary under a contract to perform work in Iraq, according to an audit by a government oversight agency.

IRAQ: Contractors Face Growing Parallel War; As Security Work Increases, So Do Casualties
by Steve FainaruWashington Post Foreign Service
June 16th, 2007
Private security companies, funded by billions of dollars in U.S. military and State Department contracts, are fighting insurgents on a widening scale in Iraq, enduring daily attacks, returning fire and taking hundreds of casualties that have been underreported and sometimes concealed, according to U.S. and Iraqi officials and company representatives.

IRAQ: Death Toll for Contractors Reaches New High in Iraq
by John M. Broder and James RisenNew York Times
May 19th, 2007
Casualties among private contractors in Iraq have soared to record levels this year, setting a pace that seems certain to turn 2007 into the bloodiest year yet for the civilians who work alongside the American military in the war zone, according to new government numbers.

IRAQ: US money is 'squandered' in Iraq
BBC News
January 31st, 2007
Millions of dollars in US rebuilding funds have been wasted in Iraq, US auditors say in a report which warns corruption in the country is rife.

IRAQ: Bechtel Departure Removes More Illusions
by Dahr Jamail and Ali al-FadhilyInter Press Service
November 9th, 2006
The decision of the giant engineering company Bechtel to withdraw from Iraq has left many Iraqis feeling betrayed. In its departure they see the end of remaining hopes for the reconstruction of Iraq.

IRAQ: Bechtel ends Iraq rebuilding after a rough 3 years
by David R. BakerSan Francisco Chronicle
November 1st, 2006
Bechtel Corp. went to Iraq three years ago to help rebuild a nation torn by war. Since then, 52 of its people have been killed and much of its work sabotaged as Iraq dissolved into insurgency and sectarian violence.

IRAQ: Idle Contractors Add Millions to Iraq Rebuilding
by James GlantzThe New York Times
October 25th, 2006
Overhead costs have consumed more than half the budget of some reconstruction projects in Iraq, according to a government estimate released yesterday, leaving far less money than expected to provide the oil, water and electricity needed to improve the lives of Iraqis.

IRAQ: As U.S. effort winds down, can Iraq fill 'reconstruction gap'?
by Charles J. HanleyAssociated Press
October 16th, 2006
America's big builders invaded Iraq three years ago, hard on the heels of U.S. troops and tanks. Now the reconstruction billions are drying up so they're pulling out, leaving both completed and unfinished projects in the hands of an Iraqi government unprepared to manage either.

IRAQ: In Iraq, contractor deaths near 650, legal fog thickens
by Bernd DebusmannReuters
October 10th, 2006
The war in Iraq has killed at least 647 civilian contractors to date, according to official figures that provide a stark reminder of the huge role of civilians in supporting the U.S. military.

US: Congress Is Told of Failures of Rebuilding Work in Iraq
by James GlanzThe New York Times
September 28th, 2006
In a sweeping new assessment of reconstruction failures in Iraq, a federal inspector told Congress on Thursday that 13 of 14 major projects built by the American contractor Parsons that were examined by his agency were substandard, with construction deficiencies and other serious problems.

US: Katrina Costs Continue to Swell
by Richard WolfUSA Today
August 22nd, 2006
The fiscal impact of Hurricane Katrina, the most costly natural disaster in U.S. history, shows no sign of ending.

CANADA: Our side of defence
by Jorge BarreraThe Ottawa Times
August 20th, 2006
Ottawa may have the reputation of a government town, but it's also home to Canada's military-industrial complex.

IRAQ: Army Cancels Contract for Iraqi Prison
by James GlanzThe New York Times
June 20th, 2006
The Army Corps of Engineers said Monday that it had canceled a $99.1 million contract with Parsons, one of the largest companies working in Iraq, to build a prison north of Baghdad after the firm fell more than two years behind schedule, threatened to go millions of dollars over budget and essentially abandoned the construction site.

US: Suspected Illegal Workers Found at Halliburton Job Site
by Griff WitteThe Washington Post
October 22nd, 2005
Federal agents have identified 10 suspected illegal immigrants working at a naval base near New Orleans where the Halliburton Co. subsidiary Kellogg Brown & Root is leading hurricane reconstruction, according to a spokeswoman for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

US: Lobbyists Advise Katrina Relief
by Alan C. Miller and Ken SilversteinThe Los Angeles Times
October 10th, 2005
Lobbyists representing transportation, energy and other special interests dominated panels that advised Louisiana's U.S. senators crafting legislation to rebuild the storm-damaged Gulf Coast, records and interviews show.

US: Katrina work goes to officials who led Iraq effort
by Adam EntousReuters
October 6th, 2005
Top officials who managed U.S. reconstruction projects in Iraq have been hired by some of the same big companies that received those contracts and which are now involved in a rush of deals to rebuild after Hurricane Katrina.

US: Boosted, not battered, in the hurricane's wake
by Carola Hoyos, Financial TimesThe Financial Times
October 4th, 2005

US: U.S. Paying a Premium to Cover Storm-Damaged Roofs
by Aaron C. DavisKnight Ridder
September 30th, 2005
Across the hurricane ravaged Gulf Coast, thousands upon thousands of blue tarps are being nailed to wind-damaged roofs, a visible sign of government assistance. Construction crews working with TJC Defense, out of Alabama, install a blue tarp on a home in Kenner, Louisiana. Ian McVea, Fort Worth Star-Telegram The blue sheeting - a godsend to residents whose homes are threatened by rain - is rapidly becoming the largest roofing project in the nation's history. It isn't coming cheap.

US: Many Contracts for Storm Work Raise Questions
by Eric Lipton and Ron NixonThe New York Times
September 26th, 2005
Topping the federal government's list of costs related to Hurricane Katrina is the $568 million in contracts for debris removal landed by a Florida company with ties to Mississippi's Republican governor. Near the bottom is an $89.95 bill for a pair of brown steel-toe shoes bought by an Environmental Protection Agency worker in Baton Rouge, La.

US: Auditors investigate Katrina contracts
by Hope YenAssociated Press
September 22nd, 2005
Government auditors are questioning whether several multimillion-dollar Katrina contracts” including one involving a subsidiary of Houston-based Halliburton Co.” invite abuse because they are open-ended and not clearly defined.

IRAQ: Contractor Charged in Baghdad Badge Scam
by  Jerry Markon and Josh WhiteThe Washington Post
September 21st, 2005
A military contractor returning from Iraq was charged yesterday with distributing identity badges that control access to Baghdad's heavily fortified Green Zone to people not allowed to receive them, including an Iraqi woman he was dating.

IRAQ: Poor Planning and Corruption Hobble Reconstruction of Iraq
by Craig S. SmithThe New York Times
September 18th, 2005
In April, Najaf's main maternity hospital received rare good news: an $8 million refurbishment program financed by the United States would begin immediately. But five months and millions of dollars later, the hospital administrators say they have little but frustration to show for it.

US: Many Contracts for Storm Work Raise Questions
by Eric Lipton and Ron NixonThe New York Times
August 26th, 2005
Topping the federal government's list of costs related to Hurricane Katrina is the $568 million in contracts for debris removal landed by a Florida company with ties to Mississippi's Republican governor. Near the bottom is an $89.95 bill for a pair of brown steel-toe shoes bought by an Environmental Protection Agency worker in Baton Rouge, La.

INDIA: Bechtel Sells Its Stake In Dabhol Power Plant
by JOHN LARKINWall Street Journal
July 14th, 2005
Bechtel Group Inc. agreed to sell its equity in the troubled Dabhol power project for $160 million, according to people involved in the transaction, edging India closer to ending a four-year dispute that has plagued its efforts to boost foreign investment.

IRAQ: Privatization in Disguise
by Naomi KleinThe Nation
April 18th, 2003
On April 6, Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz spelled it out: There will be no role for the United Nations in setting up an interim government in Iraq. The US-run regime will last at least six months, "probably...longer than that."

US: In Tough Times, a Company Finds Profits in Terror War
by Jeff Gerth and Don Van Natta Jr.New York Times
July 12th, 2002
The Halliburton Company, the Dallas oil services company bedeviled lately by an array of accounting and business issues, is benefiting very directly from the United States efforts to combat terrorism.From building cells for detainees at Guantnamo Bay in Cuba to feeding American troops in Uzbekistan, the Pentagon is increasingly relying on a unit of Halliburton called KBR, sometimes referred to as Kellogg Brown & Root.