Contact l Sitemap

home industries issues reasearch weblog press

Home  » Industries » War & Disaster Profiteering

News Articles : Displaying 1436-1455 of 1515


Afghanistan: World Bank and Central Asian Pipeline
Agence France-Presse
May 15th, 2002
World Bank chief James Wolfensohn said Wednesday he had held talks about financing a fuel pipeline to channel massive gas reserves from Turkmenistan through Afghanistan to India or Pakistan. Wolfensohn, who was in the Afghan capital to open the financial institution's offices here and to confirm 100 million dollars of World Bank grants for the interim administration, said a number of companies had already expressed an interest in the project.

US: Sex scandal still haunts DynCorp
by John CrewdsonTribune
May 13th, 2002
Hoping to avoid a repeat of a sex scandal that marred the presence of American police officers in Bosnia, U.S. law-enforcement personnel recruited to help reorganize Iraq's shattered police forces must acknowledge in writing that human trafficking and involvement with prostitution "are considered illegal by the international community and are immoral, unethical and strictly prohibited."

US: Wages Of Sin - Why Lawbreakers Still Win Government Contracts
by Christopher H. SchmittU.S. News & World Report
May 13th, 2002
Lockheed Martin is not the only big federal contractor that continues to do business with Washington despite repeated contract difficulties and other legal and regulatory trouble. In the past dozen years, 30 of the 43 largest federal contractors have racked up more than 400 enforcement cases, resulting in at least 28 criminal convictions, 286 civil settlements, and 88 administrative settlements, mostly involving their government contracts, according to data from the Project on Government Oversight, a nonprofit Washington, D.C. group that investigates government activities, and additional research by U.S. News.

US: Unjust Rewards
by Ken SilversteinMother Jones
May 1st, 2002
The government continues to award federal business worth billions to companies that repeatedly break the law. A Mother Jones investigation reveals which major contractors are the worst offenders.

US: Prophet Rushed to the Field For Intelligence Collection
by Elizabeth G. BookNational Defense Magazine
April 1st, 2002
The Army's tactical signals-intelligence and electronic-warfare system, the Prophet, has undergone a faster-than-planned development cycle, in order to meet operational needs in Afghanistan. The systems in the field today are not the full "100 percent solution," officials said, but they provide a sound foundation for the Army to plan future upgrades.

ECUADOR: Farmers Fight DynCorp's Chemwar on the Amazon
by Jeffrey St. Clair and Alexander CockburnCounterpunch
February 27th, 2002
The International Labor Rights Fund has filed suit in US federal court on behalf of 10,000 Ecuadorian peasant farmers and Amazonian Indians charging DynCorp with torture, infanticide and wrongful death for its role in the aerial spraying of highly toxic pesticides in the Amazonian jungle, along the border of Ecuador and Colombia.

US: DynCorp Disgrace
by Kelly Patricia O'MearaInsight Magazine
January 14th, 2002
Middle-aged men having sex with 12- to 15-year-olds was too much for Ben Johnston, a hulking 6-foot-5-inch Texan, and more than a year ago he blew the whistle on his employer, DynCorp, a U.S. contracting company doing business in Bosnia.

USA: Bush Faces Flak Over Links to Defense Contractor
by Jason NissThe Independent (UK)
January 13th, 2002
President George W Bush's administration, already on the back foot over its connections with the collapsed energy giant Enron, faces questions over a massive defence contract which aided an investment firm with Bush family links.

USA: Boeing's Sweet Deal
by Jeffrey St. ClairCounter Punch
November 26th, 2001
Boeing may have lost out to Lockheed in it's bid to build the Joint Strike Fighter, one of the most lucrative contracts in Pentagon history, but no one should mourn for the defense giant. The Pentagon needs a plump Boeing as much as Boeing needs Pentagon largesse. In this spirit, it's no surprise that Congress is poised to quietly hand Boeing a big consolation prize in the form two unprecedented contracts that will give the company, which has recently fled Seattle for Chicago, a bailout that will total more than $10 billion.

UZBEKISTAN: US Ally Hopes War Will Lead to Oil Investment
by Priscilla PattonGlobalvision News Network
November 26th, 2001
The Uzbek government hopes to parlay its close working relationship with the United States during the ''war on terrorism'' into closer economic ties, garnering much-needed direct investment for its underdeveloped petrochemical sector and increased bilateral trade, according to Sadyq Safayev, former Uzbek ambassador to the U.S. and first deputy foreign minister since May.

US: Osama's Mama - Corporate Hip-Hop Promotes War
by Kevin WestonPacific News Service
November 5th, 2001
The night the United States began bombing Afghanistan, I was listening to a Bay Area hip-hop/R&B station, KMEL. KMEL is owned by Clear Channel, one of the largest radio conglomerates in the country.

US: Economic Stimulus With Corporations in Mind
by Gretchen MorgensonNew York Times
October 27th, 2001
Late last winter, when President Bush was shaping his $1.35 trillion tax cut, corporate lobbyists were told to wait, their turn would come. And now, their turn is here. The $100 billion tax-cut bill narrowly passed by the House this week and sent to the Senate has been lauded by the White House as a broad stimulus package that will pull the United States economy out of a stall made worse by the terrorist attacks.

USA: Crumbling Public Sector Makes Country Vulnerable to Bio-Terrorism
by Naomi KleinToronto Globe & Mail
October 24th, 2001
Only hours after the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, Republican Representative Curt Weldon went on CNN and announced that he didn't want to hear anyone talking about funding for schools or hospitals. From here on, it was all about spies, bombs and other manly things.

USA: Business Wants Military Ties with Indonesia
by Tim ShorrockAsia Times
October 10th, 2001
WASHINGTON -- With political tension building in Indonesia over the United States military attacks on Afghanistan, US business groups are hoping to increase support for the government of Megawati Sukarnoputri by convincing Congress to lift the ban on military training for Jakarta.

US: Opportunists Use the Crisis to Push Agenda
by Naomi KleinThe Herald (Glasgow, Scotland)
October 4th, 2001
There are many contenders for biggest political opportunist since the September 11 atrocities. Politicians ramming through life-changing laws while telling voters they are still mourning; corporations diving for public cash; pundits accusing their opponents of treason.

US: 'New War' May Shift Defense Spending
by Gary GentileAssociated Press
October 1st, 2001
In the nation's "new kind of war" on terrorism, defense spending is likely to focus as much on information and surveillance as bombs and bullets.

USA: Biotech Terrorism?
by Jeremy RifkinThe Guardian (UK)
September 27th, 2001
For the first 10 days we worried about commercial airplanes being hijacked and used as missiles. Now, the American people are worried about a new, even more deadly threat: bacteria and viruses raining from the sky over populated areas, infecting and killing millions of people.

USA: Merchants of Death Cash In on Tragedy
by Tom TurnipseedCommon Dreams
September 25th, 2001
While the dead and missing toll rose toward 7000 people and the stock market suffered it's largest week's loss since the great depression due to the terrorist attack on the symbols of U.S. economic and military power, the stock of the weapon and surveillance industries zoomed. The 401 (k)retirement plans of U.S. citizens took their biggest one week hit ever as the Dow Jones fell 14.3% last week, but the big winners of the week were the weapons industry, who were the top eight corporations in percentage increase in the price of their stock.

USA: War on Terror, or Fight Against Old Enemies?
by Robert FiskThe Independent (UK)
September 25th, 2001
While covering the Russian occupation of Afghanistan, I would, from time to time, drive down through Jalalabad and cross the Pakistan border to Peshawar to rest. In the cavernous, stained interior of the old Intercontinental Hotel, I would punch out my stories on a groaning telex machine beside an office bearing the legend ''Chief Accountant'' on the door.

USA: Wartime Opportunists
by Russell Mokhiber and Robert WeissmanFocus on the Corporation
September 6th, 2001
Corporate interests and their proxies are looking to exploit the September 11 tragedy to advance a self-serving agenda that has nothing to do with national security and everything to do with corporate profits and dangerous ideologies.

Displaying 1436-1455 of 1515  
< Prev  Next >> 
« First Page Last Page » 
« Show Complete List »