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CorpWatch Exclusives

Secwepemc Tribes Fight New Mines and Old Laws in British Columbia
by Richard SmallteacherCorpWatch Blog
October 22nd, 2014
Indigenous activists burned down a bridge in British Columbia, Canada, to prevent Imperial Metals from starting a lead and zinc mine on the lands of the Secwepemc peoples. Local tribes say that the mine may severely impact the one of the largest remaining sockeye salmon populations in the world.

Ten Killed At African Barrick Operations in Tanzania
by Richard SmallteacherCorpWatch Blog
August 26th, 2014
As many as 10 people have been killed by police this year at African Barrick Gold's operations in Tanzania, according to a new report from two NGOs - MiningWatch Canada and Rights and Accountability in Development (RAID) in the UK.

Coca-Cola Forced To Shut Bottling Plant in India
by Fatima HansiaCorpWatch Blog
July 10th, 2014
Coca-Cola, the world’s largest beverage producer, has been ordered to shut down its bottling plant in Varanasi, India following local complaints that the company was drawing excessive amounts of groundwater. After an investigation, government authorities ruled that the company had violated its operating license.

Soco International Says It Will Cancel Oil Exploration in Congo's Virunga Park
by Fatima HansiaCorpWatch Blog
June 23rd, 2014
Soco International PLC, a UK oil company, has claimed that it will halt oil exploration in Virunga National Park in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), following complaints by local communities and the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) about the potential environmental impact.

Peabody Coal Accused of False Advertising for Claiming to Stop Energy Poverty
by Rozali TelbisCorpWatch Blog
April 28th, 2014
WWF Europe has filed a complaint for false advertising against Peabody Energy, the world’s largest coal mining company, after the company began a campaign to promote the use of coal in developing countries, claiming that so-called "clean coal" technology could eradicate poverty.

Anglo American Workers Strike Against Contract Labor Conditions in Chile
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
March 25th, 2014
Some 4,000 contract workers at Los Bronces copper mine in Chile went on strike against Anglo American, a UK-based mining multinational from South Africa. The strike is the latest in a series of protests against the Chilean copper industry, the world’s largest producers of the metal.

Unpublished Audit of Kaloti Reveal Conflicts Over Gold Trade
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
February 28th, 2014
A whistleblower who previously worked for Ernst & Young, the international auditing firm, has alleged that his bosses turned a blind eye to discoveries that Kaloti Jewellery International – one of the world’s biggest gold companies - dealt in minerals from undocumented sources that may have included conflict zones.

Sámi Fight Iron Mine in Reindeer Country
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
December 29th, 2013
This past Christmas, while children around the world wrote letters to Santa Claus whom they believed would deliver presents to them in a sleigh drawn by the mythical Rudolph, the actual human companions of the Arctic reindeer spent their holidays worrying about Beowulf, a British mining company.

Fracking Argentina: Chevron Teams Up With YPF
by Richard Smallteacher
October 16th, 2013
YPF, the Argentinian state-owned oil company, has signed an agreement with Chevron in the U.S. to extract shale gas and oil using fracking technology in the southern Andes mountains. Local environmental and indigenous activists are gearing up for a fight to stop the controversial technology.

BSGR Investigated for Corruption in Guinea Iron Ore Deal
by Richard Smallteacher
October 4th, 2013
BSGR, an Israeli mining conglomerate, is under investigation for the acquisition of mining rights to the Simandou iron ore deposit in Guinea, said to be the biggest in the world.

Privatization Profiteers from Pinochet’s Chile May Yet Face Prison
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
September 17th, 2013
Julio Ponce, the billionaire owner of Sociedad Quimica & Minera de Chile (SQM), faces ten years in prison for insider trading. A beneficiary of former dictator General Augusto Pinochet, Ponce is charged with buying company shares at below market prices and selling them at a profit.

Battle of Balcombe: Opposition to Cuadrilla Resources UK Fracking Plans
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
July 31st, 2013
The idyllic village of Balcombe, just south of London, is a stronghold of the Conservative party. Just the sort of place that one might imagine cheering on industry plans to drill for natural gas and applaud the tax breaks that the government has offered to industry.

Halliburton Admits Guilt in Gulf of Mexico Cover-Up
by Richard SmallteacherCorpWatch Blog
July 26th, 2013
Halliburton has admitted that it destroyed evidence after the April 2010 Deepwater Horizon catastrophe in the Gulf of Mexico. The company has agreed to pay a $200,000 fine, make a donation of $55 million to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and accept three years of probation.

Lobbyists for Canadian Pipeline Have Deep Ties to White House
by Pratap Chatterjee
May 31st, 2013
TransCanada and the provincial government of Alberta are paying former advisors to the Obama administration - as well as former staff of the Hillary Clinton and John Kerry presidential campaigns - to help them lobby for the proposed Keystone XL pipeline to transport tar sands fuel to the U.S.

Arch Coal Denied Permission to Blow Up West Virginia Mountain
by Puck LoCorpWatch Blog
April 25th, 2013
A subsidiary of Arch Coal of St. Louis, Missouri, was denied permission to dump nearly three billion cubic feet of dirt into local headwater streams after blowing up a mountain in West Virginia. The object was to extract coal from a project known as the Spruce No. 1 Surface Mine.

Arch Coal Wants Permission to Blow Up West Virginia Mountain
by Puck LoCorpWatch Blog
April 24th, 2013
A subsidiary of Arch Coal of St. Louis, Missouri, wants permission to dump nearly three billion cubic feet of dirt into local headwater streams after blowing up a mountain in West Virginia. The object is to extract coal from a project known as the Spruce No. 1 Surface Mine.

Alstom Officials Paid Bribes To Win Indonesian Coal Contracts
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
April 22nd, 2013
Alstom, a French engineering company, has been accused of bribing Indonesian officials to win a lucrative contract to build coal power plans in Sumatra. Frederic Pierucci, a French employee of the company, was arrested and David Rothschild, a U.S. employee, has pled guilty.

Guatemalan Lawsuit Against Canadian Mining Giant May Set Precedent
by Jennifer KennedyCorpWatch Blog
April 19th, 2013
A lawsuit against HudBay Minerals in Canada for human rights abuses in Guatemala is the next case to watch for corporate accountability activists after the U.S. Supreme Court rejected a case against Shell for aiding and abetting human rights abuses in Nigeria.

U.S. Supreme Court Dismisses Lawsuit Against Shell in Nigeria
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
April 17th, 2013
In a unanimous ruling, the U.S. Supreme Court dismissed a lawsuit against Shell in Nigeria for human rights abuses in the Ogoni region. The ruling effectively blocks other lawsuits against foreign multinationals for human rights abuse that have occurred overseas from being brought in U.S. courts.

Protests Against Posco Steel Plant Mount In India
by Freny ManeckshaCorpWatch Blog
April 14th, 2013
For over a month, villagers in the eastern Indian state of Odisha have been conducting a sit-in to demand the withdrawal of armed police officers at the site of a proposed $12 billion steel complex to be built by Pohang Iron and Steel Company (POSCO) of South Korea.

South African Gold Miners Sue Over Deadly Lung Disease
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
January 3rd, 2013
Thousands of gold miners have asked permission from South African courts to sue some 30 mining companies over negligence in health and safety that the miners allege has caused them to contract silicosis, a debilitating and potentially fatal lung disease.

Damming the Ngäbe: Aftermath of an AES Power Project in Panama
by Jennifer Kennedy
October 15th, 2012
Well over a year after AES Corporation, a U.S. based power company headquartered in Arlington, Virginia, inundated the lands of the Ngäbe to build a hydroelectric dam in Panama, many in the community remains dispossessed.

Obama Administration Backs Shell in Supreme Court Case
by Puck LoCorpWatch Blog
August 24th, 2012
The Obama administration is backing Shell Oil after abruptly changing sides in a landmark U.S. Supreme Court case that could make it even more difficult for survivors of human rights abuses overseas to sue multinational corporations in federal courts. The case will be heard on October 1.

Bolivia pushes back against Swiss commodities giant Glencore
by Carmelo Ruiz-MarreroCorpWatch Blog
July 24th, 2012
Glencore corporation, the secretive Swiss commodities giant which has become one of the world's biggest trader of grain, oil and minerals, has hit an unlikely roadblock. The Bolivian government nationalized the Colquiri tin and zinc mine, the third Glencore asset to be seized by the state in five years.

Faking Happiness: Activists Strike Back at Vedanta Ad Campaign
by Freny ManeckshaCorpWatch Blog
May 30th, 2012
Vedanta Resources, a UK based mining and metals company with numerous projects in India, is attempting to claim to be social responsible via a huge advertising campaign. However activists have struck back by effectively using social media tools to counter Vedanta's claims.

Glencore Allegedly Buys Copper From Ten Year Old Miners
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
April 17th, 2012
Children as young as ten in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, dig for cobalt and copper which they then sell to Switzerland-based Glencore, the world’s largest commodities company, according to a new BBC investigation.

Green Deserts: The Palm Oil Conflict
by Melody KempSpecial to CorpWatch
February 16th, 2012
Wilmar of Singapore, the world’s biggest global processor and merchandiser of palm oil, has come in for harsh criticism for the environmental and social impact of its Indonesian plantations. The allegations also raise serious questions about the role of WWF and the Round Table on Sustainable Palm Oil.

Keystone Pipeline Faces Indigenous Trans-Border Opposition
by Geoff DembickiSpecial to CorpWatch
October 4th, 2011
TransCanada is seeking permission to build a 1,661-mile-long oil pipeline to carry crude from Alberta's oil sands to refineries on the Texas Gulf Coast. Tribal leaders from both sides of the border have joined environmental activists to oppose the project.

Burmese Crossroads: Oil & Gas Rush Stokes Civil War
by Matthew F SmithSpecial to CorpWatch
July 26th, 2011
Chinese and South Korean companies are leading an investor rush to Burma to build lucrative cross-country pipelines to deliver Saudi oil and Burmese natural gas to China. Poor communities have been displaced and allegations of human rights abuses are rife in the pipeline's route.

Toxic Pop: How Tar Sands Fuel Disposable Cans
by Geoff DembickiSpecial to CorpWatch
July 11th, 2011
One in six of the 100 billion soda, beer, and juice cans cracked open by North Americans each year owe their existence to an industrial product manufactured from Alberta’s tar sands. The result is an environmental disaster for Canada as well as a major contributor to global warming.

Killing Clean Energy Laws
by Geoff DembickiSpecial to CorpWatch
May 5th, 2011
Tar sands from Alberta have enabled Canada to become the largest supplier of crude oil to the U.S. Tom Corcoran, a Washington lobbyist, is paid to promote this rapidly growing industry that produces some of the most emissions-heavy gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel on the planet.

Gulf Dispersants: BP and Nalco Play Toxic Roulette
by Terry J. AllenSpecial to CorpWatch
July 19th, 2010
BP has dumped almost two million gallons of dispersants from Nalco in the Gulf of Mexico that is disguising the extent of the Deepwater spill and the inability of existing technology to mitigate the disaster. Even if BP eventually staunches the hemorrhage of oil, devastating toxins will linger for decades.

The True Cost of Chevron: An Alternative Annual Report
by Antonia JuhaszTrue Cost of Chevron
May 25th, 2010
Chevron's 2009 Annual Report celebrates 130 years of Chevron operations. We, the communities and our allies who bear the consequences of Chevron's offshore drilling rigs, oil and natural gas production, coal fields, refineries, depots, pipelines, exploration, chemical plants, political control, consumer abuse, false promises, and much more, have a very different account to offer.

ADM's New Frontiers: Palm Oil Deforestation and Child Labor
by Charlie CraySpecial to CorpWatch
May 18th, 2010
ADM has moved beyond the days of blatant price-fixing that landed its top execs behind bars. But the company's forays into new global agricultural markets bring charges of complicity in forced child labor and rampant deforestation. Critics assert that the conglomerate's embrace of self- regulation and voluntary guidelines is but a cynical ploy to deter effective reform.

BP: Beyond Petroleum or Beyond Preposterous? (2000)
by Kenny Bruno
May 12th, 2010
In 2000 British Petroleum launched an expensive ad campaign, re-branding its corporate image into the eco-friendly "BP: Beyond Petroleum.” We said it then. When a company spends more on advertising its environmental friendliness than on environmental actions, that's greenwash. Three long weeks into the BP oil disaster roiling the Gulf of Mexico, CorpWatch's December 2000 skewering of its new image sadly, bears repeating.

Protesters in Eastern India Battle Against Mining Giant Arcelor Mittal
by Moushumi BasuSpecial to CorpWatch
March 2nd, 2010
In the rural, tribal lands of Eastern India, protesters are going head-to-head with world steel giant Arcelor Mittal. “We may give away our lives, but we will not part with an inch of our ancestral land," the villagers cry. "The forest, rivers and land are ours. We don't want factories, steel or iron. Arcelor Mittal Go Back.”

The Enbridge Oil Sands Gamble
by Andrew NikiforukSpecial to CorpWatch
December 14th, 2009
Patrick Daniel, the CEO of Enbridge Inc, is bullish about the future of unconventional oil from Canada’s massive tar sand deposits. His company not only operates North America’s longest crude oil and liquid pipelines, but transports 12 percent of the oil that the U.S. imports daily. Canada’s bitumen, or dirty crude, lies under a forest area the size of England and is arguably the world’s last remaining giant oil field.

Uranium Corporation of India Limited: Wasting Away Tribal Lands
by Moushumi BasuSpecial to CorpWatch
October 7th, 2009
In Eastern India's Jharkand State, tensions are mounting between Indigenous tribal communities and the Uranium Corporation of India Limited, or UCIL. Heavy security at a May public hearing in Jadugoda prevented many local activists and villagers from entering. But outside the hearing, activists from the Jharkhandi Organization Against Radiation (JOAR) argued their case for protecting their health and the environment from horrific impacts of radioactive contaminated waste resulting from uranium mining.

Damming Magdalena: Emgesa Threatens Colombian Communities
by Jonathan LunaSpecial to CorpWatch
July 21st, 2009
Near the town of La Jagua, overlooking the Magdalena River, the landscape is dotted with concrete markers declaring the land, river, and everything else a “public utility” that Colombia has given to the energy company Emgesa as part of the Quimbo Hydroelectric Project. A construction permit was granted in May, with the dam scheduled for full operation by 2014.

Goa Cursed By Its Mineral Wealth
by Emily BildSpecial to CorpWatch
April 23rd, 2009
Set on India's west coast, Goa is renowned as a beach paradise popular with Indian and foreign tourists alike. Just a few miles inland from the quaint restaurants and the pristine waves lapping the silver shores of India's smallest state, iron-ore mining is destroying the environment, say activists and locals.

Regulating Ramatex: Authorities Shut Out as Malaysian Investor Threatens Namibian Environment
by Moses MagadzaSpecial to CorpWatch
April 5th, 2009
For nearly six years Ramatex Textile and Garment Factory barred government regulators from entering industrial premises leased from the City of Windhoek. Ramatex came to Namibia in 2001, lured by the newly implemented African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA). Evidence of environmental violations finally emerged after the company absconded.

Xstrata Dreaming: The Struggle of Aboriginal Australians against a Swiss Mining Giant
by Michael DeibertSpecial to CorpWatch
February 16th, 2009
The McArthur River winds through Australia’s remote Northern Territory, home to four main Aboriginal linguistic groups: the Gurdanji, Yanyuwa, Garawa and Mara. Earlier this month Australian Minister for Environment Peter Garrett announced conditional approval for a bid by Swiss mining giant Xstrata to expand its zinc mining operations in the sacred McArthur River floodplain.

Norilsk Nickel: A Tale of Unbridled Capitalism, Russian Style
by Anton FoekSpecial to CorpWatch
October 9th, 2008
The launch of Russia’s stock markets in the early 90s and privatization of state assets has profoundly impacted Russian society. As the case of mining giant Norilsk Nickel illustrates, this experiment has given rise to both immense personal wealth for a new elite, and economic uncertainty for the ordinary citizen.

Ducking Responsibility: Entergy Spins Its Nukes
by Shay TottenSpecial to CorpWatch
August 4th, 2008
Entergy Nuclear (part of the broader Entergy energy family) is spinning off its northeastern U.S.-based nuclear power plants into a related limited liability corporation, Enexus. Stakeholders in Vermont, home of the Yankee Nuclear power plant, are less than happy, with Entergy also reneging on prior commitments to cover eventual plant decommissioning costs, potentially stranding taxpayers with much of the bill.

Dark Side of the Tourist Boom: Cruise Ship Controversies Cross Borders
by Kent PatersonSpecial to CorpWatch
July 9th, 2008
The Mexican Pacific resort of Zihuatanejo recently cancelled a major new cruise ship terminal, giving a victory to environmental activists and other opponents. However, Mexico remains the world’s Number One cruise ship destination; and with little regulation, allegations of onboard crime, and increasing militarization as regards security while ships are in port, the rapidly expanding industry is facing new challenges.

A Glittering Demon: Mining, Poverty and Politics in the Democratic Republic of Congo
by Michael DeibertSpecial to CorpWatch
June 26th, 2008
In the DRC, a nation rich in natural resources yet confounded by civil war and endemic poverty, artisanal mining communities are struggling for their livelihoods as foreign multinationals like AngloGold Ashanti rush to cash in.

Crossing the Wayúu: Pipeline Divides Indigenous Lands in South America
by Jonathan Luna Special to CorpWatch
June 5th, 2008
Touted as the first step in a major regional integration project, the 225-kilometer TransCaribe pipeline travels underground across Colombia's Guajira Peninsula to the gas refineries of Maracaibo, Venezuela. Protesting the mega project's impacts on the peninsula's indigenous communities, the Wayúu community of Mashiis-Manaa is leading the struggle against oil giant Petróleos de Venezuela.

Suing the Smelter: Oklahoma Town Takes on Freeport
by Eliza StricklandSpecial to CorpWatch
May 15th, 2008
Residents of the town of Blackwell, Oklahoma have brought a class action lawsuit against mining giant Freeport McMoRan. The plaintiffs say that the company's zinc smelter, which closed in 1974, left a toxic legacy in the town, including contaminated sand from the smelter that was given away for free.

Booming Chinese Demand Has Ripples Down Under In Queensland
by Patrick O'KeeffeSpecial to CorpWatch
April 16th, 2008
A bauxite mine and a proposed refinery in northern Queensland, Australia, to be developed by a Chinese mineral company, has divided local and traditional landowners. Part of a major industrialization scheme, it has also sparked worries among environmentalists.

Smokestack Injustice? Toxic Texas Smelter May Reopen
by Kent PatersonSpecial to CorpWatch
April 2nd, 2008
The old American Smelting and Refining Company (Asarco) copper smelter in El Paso, Texas, which has spewed out toxins for over a century, has been granted a new five-year permit. This is despite the fact that it violates international laws by polluting communities on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border.

Ecuador's Yasuni Park: Oil Exploration or Nature Protection?
by Agneta EnströmSpecial to CorpWatch
March 20th, 2008
Permission for Petrobras of Brazil to drill for oil in Yasuni National Park, one of the most biologically diverse places in the world, has been suspended, but some damage has already been done by Swedish construction giant Skanska. Unless new money is found to protect the forest, exploration may resume.

Climate Change Debate Fuels Greenwash Boom
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
December 11th, 2007
On the Indonesian island of Bali, thousands of senior government officials are negotiating a plan to slow global warming. The coal, gas and oil companies that are major producers of greenhouse gases are finally taking notice of these high-level political discussions, and many have mounted spirited public relations exercises to defend themselves.

Titanium or Water? Trouble brews in Southern India
by Nityanand JayaramanSpecial to CorpWatch
October 24th, 2007
Tata, India's largest conglomerate, wants to take 10,000 acres of land to mine ilmenite in the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu. The plan has sparked protests by local villagers who say the project will destroy their traditional way of life and the environment.

Lessons of Empire: India, 60 Years After Independence
by Nick Robins and Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
August 14th, 2007
60 years after India gained independence, British capital is still exploiting poor communities in its former colony. Centuries after Britain's East India Company -- the world's first multinational -- faced protests in London, a group of villagers continue the tradition of resistance.

Mud and the Minister: A Tale of Woe in Java
by Anton FoekSpecial to CorpWatch
July 20th, 2007
Over a year after a torrent of liquid mud at an Indonesian oil exploration site inundated four villages, killing almost 100 people, the local community is still awaiting clean-up and proper compensation. This is despite the fact that the drilling company is owned by the family of a senior Indonesian minister.

Barrick's Dirty Secrets: Communities Respond to Gold Mining's Impacts Worldwide
May 1st, 2007
A new CorpWatch report details the operations of Barrick Gold in nine different countries, focusing on the efforts on the part of the communities to seek justice from this powerful multinational.
Download Spanish version of report

Speaking Diné to Dirty Power: Navajo Challenge New Coal-Fired Plant
by Jeff ConantSpecial to CorpWatch
April 3rd, 2007
A small, but growing, group of Diné indigenous peoples in New Mexico are protesting against a planned new huge coal-fired power plant. This is one of 150 similar plants scheduled to supply an anticipated boom in energy demand in the U.S.

Barrick Gold Mine Transforms Pacific Island
by David MartinezSpecial to CorpWatch
February 21st, 2007
Papua New Guinea, one of the world's largest islands, has fortunes in gold under its lush green mountains and a diversity of indigenous culture. The arrival of a Canadian mining company has brought violent clashes and transformed the indigenous lands forever.

Listen to an interview with the author, David Martinez


A Proxy Battle: Shareholders vs. CEOs
by Kevin KelleherSpecial to CorpWatch
June 13th, 2006
Earnest shareholder resolutions presented at company annual general meetings on everything from human rights to executive compensation are routinely shot down in flames. But shareholder resolutions may have an effect, even in defeat.

Coca Farmer Wins Bolivian Election: New President to Challenge Multinationals
by Anton FoekSpecial to CorpWatch
December 28th, 2005
Evo Morales, an Aymara Indian who grew up in childhood poverty, has won the Bolivian presidential elections. He is part of a wave of leftists taking power in Latin America and challenging multinational corporations.

Vedanta Undermines Indian Communities
by Nityanand JayaramanSpecial to Corpwatch
November 15th, 2005
Vedanta, a fast growing British mining and aluminium production company founded by a billionaire expatriate Bombay businessman, threatens communities in India with environmental degradation and widespread pollution.

Mixing Occuption and Oil in Western Sahara
by Jacob MundySpecial to CorpWatch
July 21st, 2005
Oklahoma-based Kerr-McGee's contract with Morocco to explore for oil and gain in the contested territory on the Atlantic coast of northern Africa is complicating a 30 year independence struggle.

Oil Fuels Suriname-Guyana Border Clash
by Anton FoekSpecial to CorpWatch
July 5th, 2005
Canadian, Spanish and Danish companies are fueling a border clash in the remote coastal waters off the northern edge of South America in an effort to profit out of recently discovered coastal oil reserves.
NEW!Hallliburton Wins New $4.9Billion Iraq Contract


Barrick Gold Strikes Opposition in South America
by Glenn WalkerSpecial to CorpWatch
June 20th, 2005
A proposal to "relocate" three Andean glaciers to mine for gold has local people up in arms. This billion dollar development could destroy a major source of clean water on the border of Argentina and Chile.

The Baku-Ceyhan Pipeline: BP’s Time Bomb
by Hannah EllisSpecial to CorpWatch
June 2nd, 2005
With their newly opened pipeline, British Petroleum (BP) is cutting a path of environmental and social irresponsibility from the Caspian to the Mediterranean.

'Tis the Season for Shareholder Activism
by Jan FrelSpecial to CorpWatch
May 4th, 2005
Every spring, activists and investors attend annual general meetings to protest and meet face-to-face with CEOs and corporate boards. The goal is to place their agendas -- on everything from the environment to labor practices -- front and center.

BlueLinx Buys Illegal Indonesian Timber
by Steve SlatterySpecial to CorpWatch
March 14th, 2005
JP Morgan Chase and BlueLinx linked to illegal logging of endangered Indonesia forests.

Fighting the Big Gunns in Tasmania
by Tom PriceSpecial to CorpWatch
March 14th, 2005
The war between the world's largest woodchip exporter, Gunns Limited, and the Australian conservation community has been raging for decades. But the company's recent efforts to silence Tasmanian activists through lawsuits could earn them millions and set a very dangerous precedent. ALSO: BlueLinx Buys Illegal Indonesian Timber

The Carbon Brokers
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
February 18th, 2005
Traders are gearing up for a new futures market. These new carbon exchanges promise billions in potential profit, but will they save the planet?

Give War a Chance: the Life and Times of Tim Spicer
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
June 9th, 2004
Strange or villianous, Tim Spicer's business partners over the years, have found themselves in hot water from Canada to Papua New Guinea and Zimbabwe, although he has always somehow managed to avoid prosecution.

Landmine of a Decision
by Michael McCrystalSpecial to CorpWatch
May 28th, 2004
Much is at stake for the people, economy, and environment of Namibia, where Rossing Uranium is deciding between ceasing operations or spending $100 million on a 20-year expansion of one of the world's largest mines.

ASIA: Storm Over Asian-Pacific Timber Trade
by Yoon Szu-MaeSpecial to CorpWatch
March 5th, 2004
Rimbunan Hijau, a billion-dollar business owned by Malaysian tycoon Tiong Hiew King, has been engaging in illegal logging in South East Asia, while local governments turn a blind eye.

Argentina Water Privatization Scheme Runs Dry
by Sebastian HacherSpecial to CorpWatch
February 26th, 2004
Rio de la Plata is one of the few rivers of the world whose pollution can be seen from space. Making matters worse is the privatized water company Aguas Argentinas, which dumps sewage into the river a few kilometers from where it treats water for drinking.

Jordanian Privatization Extended to the Dead Sea
by Oula Al FarawatiSpecial to CorpWatch
December 9th, 2003
Jordan is selling its stake in the flagship Arab Potash Company to the Canadian potash giant PCS as part of privatization efforts spearheaded by USAID.

MEXICO: Suez' World Water Wars
by Deepa FernandesSpecial to CorpWatch
September 9th, 2003
The latest battle in the war over privatization is being fought at the WTO negotiations in Cancun.

Listen online here via FSRN!


Coke in Varanasi: Facing Local Ire
by AflatoonIndia Resource Center
July 10th, 2003
On the 10th of May, 2003 about 100 people held a demonstration at the plant gate. Nearly 200 police personnel were deputed by the district authorities to 'protect' the plant along with 50 gun toting private security guards. While this agitation was suppressed by beating up the demonstrators to disperse them, local inhabitants are geared for a long struggle against the cola giant.

Coca-Cola: Continuing the Battle in Kerala
by Surendranath CIndia Resource Center
July 10th, 2003
Plachimada, (Palakkad district) Kerala: The Coca Cola story in Plachimada is reminiscent of David versus the mighty Goliath. In the latest twist to the tale, the Kerala Government through the Secretary, Local Self Government Department (LSGD) has stayed the Perumatty Grama Panchayat's decision not to renew the license issued to the Hindustan Coca Cola Beverages Ltd.

Communities Reject Coca-Cola in India
by Amit SrivastavaIndia Resource Center
July 10th, 2003
Coca-Cola is in trouble in India. Communities have been fighting the multinational for depleting the groundwater and contaminating what's left. A Special Series from the India Resource Center.

Bechtel's Water Wars
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
May 1st, 2003
In November 2001 Bechtel sued the country of Bolivia for $25 million for canceling a contract to run the water system of Cochabamba, the third largest city in the country, after local people took to the streets to protest massive price hikes for water.

Busting the Water Cartel
by Holly Wren SpauldingSpecial to CorpWatch
March 27th, 2003
A report from inside the World Water Forum on the showdown between water privatizers and human rights activists.

WTO and the Fate of the World's Forests
by Victor MenottiSpecial to CorpWatch
November 1st, 2001
At stake in upcoming WTO negotiations is the question of who will control and benefit from the world's forests.

MEXICO: Miners' Strike Broken in Revolutionary Cananea
by David BaconSpecial to CorpWatch
March 12th, 1999
In the mile-high mountains of the Sonora desert, just 25 miles south of the border between Arizona and Mexico, over two thousand miners have been locked in a bitter industrial war since mid-November. Here Grupo Mexico operates North America's oldest, and one of the world's largest copper mines -- Cananea -- in a town which has been a symbol of anti-government insurrection for almost 100 years.

Tom Beanal's Speech at Loyola University in New Orleans
Project Underground
May 19th, 1997
On May 23, 1996, Mr. Tom Beanal, leader of the Amungme Tribal Council and principal in a $6 billion suit against Freeport-McMoRan, spoke at Loyola University, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA.

Freeport McMoRan's Corporate Profile
Project Underground
May 19th, 1997
Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold Inc, headquartered in New Orleans, is one of the world's largest and lowest cost copper and gold producers, from its Grasberg mine in Irian Jaya. In 1996 it was regarded as one of the ten worst corporations by the Multinational Monitor magazine.

Global Gold Rush
by Joshua KarlinerCorpWatch
May 19th, 1997
Gold is an intoxicating substance. Witness the rapidity with which investors threw their money into a relatively obscure Canadian mining corporation called Bre-X, when that company claimed to have discovered the largest single deposit of the metal in history.