Contact l Sitemap

home industries issues reasearch weblog press

Home  » Issues » Labor

CorpWatch Exclusives : Displaying 41-60 of 61


Egyptian Asbestos Workers Dying of Cancer
by Aaron Glantz, Special to CorpWatch
January 13th, 2005
Workers at Aura-Misr, a Spanish-Egyptian asbestos company in Cairo, have been laid off since Christmas, after a ban on asbestos took effect in the country. Many of the fired workers have been diagnosed with cancer and they worry that other workers may soon fall ill and die also.

Sweating for the Olympics
by Sasha Lilley, Special to CorpWatch
August 11th, 2004
Behind the five intertwined rings of the Athens games, underpaid workers are sewing the shirts, gluing the shoes, and putting zippers to running suits and track apparel branded as Olympic--in working conditions that would make even the most highly trained athlete sweat.

Sweet and Sour
by Jim LobeSpecial to CorpWatch
June 23rd, 2004
A new report from Human Rights Watch reveals that American corporations such as Coca-Cola may be getting sugar from plantations in El Salvador that employ child labor.

Money for Nothing and Calls for Free
by Nidhi Kumar and Nidhi VergheseSpecial to CorpWatch
February 17th, 2004
As the outsourcing of jobs has become a hot election year issue in the US, call centers in India continue to multiply. Local workers answer calls for US corporations at a fraction of the cost of an American worker.

Operation Sweatshop Iraq
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
February 12th, 2004
Halliburton is hiring temps to work in Iraq: $100 a month for locals, $300 for Indians and $8,000 for Texans. Meanwhile taxpayers are getting charged top dollar, prompting investigations from the United States military.

Jordan's Sweatshops: The Carrot or the Stick of US Policy?
by Aaron GlantzSpecial to CorpWatch
February 26th, 2003
While the world braces for a US war against Iraq, Washington is using its newly inked Free Trade Agreement with Jordan to open sweatshops and secure an ally in the region.

Sweat-Free School Purchasing Resolutions: A New Trend?
by Ben PlimptonSpecial to CorpWatch
February 6th, 2003
School Districts and city governments are promising to purchase "sweat-free" uniforms and sports equipment. Organizers say the grassroots initiatives are a cutting edge in the fight against sweatshops.

West Coast Dockworkers: Victory in the Face of the Bush Doctrine
by David BaconSpecial to Corpwatch
January 2nd, 2003
West Coast Dockers negotiate a contract despite federal intervention on the side of business. But the Bush administration has fired a warning shot at labor.

The Prison Industry: Capitalist Punishment
by Julie LightCorpWatch
October 28th, 1999
The CMT Blues scandal and the host of human rights and labor issues it raises, is just the tip of the iceberg in a web of interconnected business, government and class interests which critics dub the ''prison industrial complex.''

La Linea: Gender, Labor and Environmental Justice on the US-Mexico Border
by Julie LightSpecial to CorpWatch
June 30th, 1999
TECATE, Mexico -- Tecate's coat of arms dubs this Mexican town ''Baja California's Industrial Paradise.'' About 30 miles from Tijuana, the city is home to the Tecate brewery and also houses an industrial park filled with assembly plants, or maquiladoras. This ''industrial paradise'' is one of several Mexican border boomtowns that is part of a global production system.

Engendering Change
by Julie LightSpecial to CorpWatch
June 26th, 1999
For women working in Mexican assembly plants, known as maquiladoras, insisting on their legal rights takes what are colloquially referred to as cojones. It indicates that Mexico's low wage feminine labor force may not be as docile as foreign employers would like to believe. It also is a harbinger of an incipient movement inside Mexico's expanding export-processing sector.

Tijuana Police Defy Court Protection of Maquiladora Strike
by David BaconSpecial to CorpWatch
May 16th, 1999
TIJUANA -- For two weeks, Tijuana has teetered on the brink of official lawlessness, as city and state police continue to defy Baja California's legal system. Raul Ramirez, member of the Baja California Academy of Human Rights, warned last week that ''the state is in danger of violating the Constitution and the Federal Labor Law... as it succumbs to the temptation to use force.''

MEXICO: Standing up for Health Rights on the Job
Special to CorpWatch
May 1st, 1999
First hand accounts of two workers who sued a San Diego-based medical manufacturer after a workplace accident.

MEXICO: University Professors Photos Draw the Wrath of Border Industrialists
by Julie LightSpecial to CorpWatch
April 29th, 1999
It wasn't just the politically provocative photographs that got Fred Lonidier's exhibit at Tijuana's public university taken down. It was the fact that he had the audacity to leaflet maquiladora workers outside the factory gates and invite them to the gallery that got his show yanked.

MEXICO: Miners' Strike Broken in Revolutionary Cananea
by David BaconSpecial to CorpWatch
March 12th, 1999
In the mile-high mountains of the Sonora desert, just 25 miles south of the border between Arizona and Mexico, over two thousand miners have been locked in a bitter industrial war since mid-November. Here Grupo Mexico operates North America's oldest, and one of the world's largest copper mines -- Cananea -- in a town which has been a symbol of anti-government insurrection for almost 100 years.

US: Oregon's Prison Slaveocracy
by Dan PensPrison Legal News
May 1st, 1998
When "get tough" voter measures requiring inmates to work for free, undermined the Oregon State Constitution, lawmakers simply amended it. Prison Legal News co-editor and inmate Pens looks at the impacts on prisoner and labor rights.

VIETNAM: Smoke From a Hired Gun
by Dara O'RourkeTransnational Resource and Action Center (TRAC)
November 10th, 1997
TRAC is pleased to be able to shed some light on this subject by releasing the first audit of this kind ever to be made public: a confidential Ernst and Young assessment of the Tae Kwang Vina plant, a factory which employs 9,200 workers who produce 400,000 pairs of shoes a month exclusively for Nike in Vietnam.

CorpWatch Interviews Lora Jo Foo
CorpWatch
September 22nd, 1997
Here is an interview with Laura Jo Foo of the Asian Law Caucus and President of Sweatshop Watch on the issue of a Living Wage.

Clinton's New ''No Sweatshop'' Agreement
by Tim ConnorCommunity Aid Abroad
September 22nd, 1997
In April this year, with much fanfare, US President Bill Clinton announced the introduction of a new ''No Sweatshop'' Code of Conduct for US Apparel and Footwear companies. The code is voluntary, but high profile companies like Nike Inc., Reebok International Ltd. and Liz Claiborne Inc. were among the ten initial signatories. These companies agreed that a set of minimum standards for working conditions in factories would be adhered to in the production of their goods -- wherever that production occurs.

Profiting from Punishment
by Paul WrightPrison Labor News
March 1st, 1997
The co-editor of Prison Legal News, a Washington State prisoner himself, Wright reports on private companies, like Boeing, that are making out like bandits by using prison labor.