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CorpWatch Exclusives

Actavis Sued To Stop Forced Switch To New Alzheimer's Drug
by Richard SmallteacherCorpWatch Blog
September 16th, 2014
Actavis, the world's third-largest generic drug manufacturer, has been sued by New York state to prevent it from forcing patients to take a new version of a popular Alzheimer's drug. The company is attempting to hook patients on an extended release version before its U.S. patent expires next year.

Gilead Sciences Under Investigation for Over Charging for Hepatitis C Pill
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
July 21st, 2014
Gilead Sciences of San Francisco is under investigation by the U.S. Senate Finance Committee for charging $84,000 for a 12 week course of a new drug to treat hepatitis C. Gilead sells the exact same course for $900 in poor countries like Egypt and India.

Big Pharma Abandons New Tuberculosis Drug Research
by Fatima HansiaCorpWatch Blog
April 1st, 2014
Three major pharmaceutical companies - AstraZeneca, Johnson & Johnson and Pfizer - have recently delayed or canceled clinical trials for testing tuberculosis (TB) drugs in India and South Africa. Activists say this is symbolic of a trend by Big Pharma to abandon research into diseases that affect poor people.

New Zealand Dairy Exporter Admits Third Contamination Scandal
by Richard SmallteacherCorpWatch Blog
August 5th, 2013
Fonterra, a New Zealand company and the world’s largest dairy exporter, has apologized for exporting a milk formula ingredient contaminated with potentially toxic bacteria. The incident comes six years after a company subsidiary in China sold contaminated baby milk formula that killed six infants and made thousands more ill.

Myriad Loses Patent to Breast Cancer Genetic Test
by Richard SmallteacherCorpWatch Blog
June 13th, 2013
Myriad Genetics has lost its right to be the exclusive U.S. commercial provider of genetic screening tests for breast cancer or ovarian cancer. The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), which sued the company, claimed that the patent would limit scientific research as well as health care options for women.

Stanford Organics Study A “Fraud” – Linked to Cargill & Tobacco Money
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
September 13th, 2012
A new study, issued by scientists at the Freeman Spogli institute at Stanford university in California, that suggests that organic food has no medical or health values is deeply flawed, say outraged activists.

Big Tobacco Battles Advertising Restrictions
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
August 30th, 2012
Big Tobacco is fighting a multi-pronged battle to defeat a global wave of laws to force them to use graphic warning labels and plain packaging. It has won a major legal battle in the U.S. this month but it has lost in Australia.

Indian Supreme Court to Hear Novartis “Patents Versus Patients” Case
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
August 21st, 2012
Novartis, the Swiss pharmaceutical company, will appear before the Indian Supreme Court Wednesday to appeal against a patent rejection for a popular cancer drug. A decision in favor of the company could have a devastating impact on cheap supplies of many kinds of generic drugs for poor patients.

Hospital Corporation of America Allegedly Profited From Questionable Cardiac Procedures
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
August 7th, 2012
Hospital Corporation of America (HCA) – the world’s largest operator of private clinics and hospitals – has come under the spotlight for performing unnecessary cardiac procedures, notably in Florida.

Fighting Malaria: Big Pharma or Better Aid Coordination?
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
May 2nd, 2012
Why don’t drug companies invest enough money in treating malaria and tuberculosis? A recent study published in the Lancet magazine estimates that 1,238,000 people died from malaria in 2010. Surely a wonder drug that stops these diseases would be wildly profitable?

Grey Market Drugs: Profiting from Poorly Managed U.S. Health Care
by Terry J. AllenSpecial to CorpWatch
January 22nd, 2012
Scalpers are doing a booming business in key medical drugs by taking advantage of U.S. patients and hospitals when they are desperate for supplies from the poorly regulated $46 billion global contract-manufacturing industry.

Asia Inhales While the West Bans the Deadly Carcinogen
by Melody KempSpecial to CorpWatch
February 16th, 2010
Asbestos, a known carcinogen, causes 100,000 occupational deaths per year. Although banned in much of the world, asbestos is a common and dangerous building block in much of Asia’s development boom, and its export remains both legal and profitable -- to the health detriment of the region.

The Enbridge Oil Sands Gamble
by Andrew NikiforukSpecial to CorpWatch
December 14th, 2009
Patrick Daniel, the CEO of Enbridge Inc, is bullish about the future of unconventional oil from Canada’s massive tar sand deposits. His company not only operates North America’s longest crude oil and liquid pipelines, but transports 12 percent of the oil that the U.S. imports daily. Canada’s bitumen, or dirty crude, lies under a forest area the size of England and is arguably the world’s last remaining giant oil field.

Bhopal: Generations of Poison
by Nityanand JayaramanSpecial to CorpWatch
December 2nd, 2009
On the night of December 2-3, 1984, the Union Carbide pesticide factory in Bhopal, India leaked poisonous methyl iso cyanate into its densely populated neighborhood, killing 8,000 people in the immediate aftermath. 25 years later, Dow Chemical (which purchased Union Carbide in 2001) still refuses to clean up the site. But a new generation of Bhopal survivors is taking on the fight.

Uranium Corporation of India Limited: Wasting Away Tribal Lands
by Moushumi BasuSpecial to CorpWatch
October 7th, 2009
In Eastern India's Jharkand State, tensions are mounting between Indigenous tribal communities and the Uranium Corporation of India Limited, or UCIL. Heavy security at a May public hearing in Jadugoda prevented many local activists and villagers from entering. But outside the hearing, activists from the Jharkhandi Organization Against Radiation (JOAR) argued their case for protecting their health and the environment from horrific impacts of radioactive contaminated waste resulting from uranium mining.

Damming Magdalena: Emgesa Threatens Colombian Communities
by Jonathan LunaSpecial to CorpWatch
July 21st, 2009
Near the town of La Jagua, overlooking the Magdalena River, the landscape is dotted with concrete markers declaring the land, river, and everything else a “public utility” that Colombia has given to the energy company Emgesa as part of the Quimbo Hydroelectric Project. A construction permit was granted in May, with the dam scheduled for full operation by 2014.

The True Cost of Chevron: An Alternative Annual Report
by Antonia Juhaszhttp://www.TrueCostofChevron.com/
May 26th, 2009
Chevron's 2008 annual report is a glossy celebration of the company's most profitable year in its history. What Chevron's annual report does not tell its shareholders is the true cost paid for those financial returns, or the global movement gaining voice and strength against the company's abuses. This jointly-produced report documents negative impacts of Chevron's operations around the globe, in stark contrast to the message sent by the company's ubiquitous "Human Energy" advertising campaign.

Goa Cursed By Its Mineral Wealth
by Emily BildSpecial to CorpWatch
April 23rd, 2009
Set on India's west coast, Goa is renowned as a beach paradise popular with Indian and foreign tourists alike. Just a few miles inland from the quaint restaurants and the pristine waves lapping the silver shores of India's smallest state, iron-ore mining is destroying the environment, say activists and locals.

Ducking Responsibility: Entergy Spins Its Nukes
by Shay TottenSpecial to CorpWatch
August 4th, 2008
Entergy Nuclear (part of the broader Entergy energy family) is spinning off its northeastern U.S.-based nuclear power plants into a related limited liability corporation, Enexus. Stakeholders in Vermont, home of the Yankee Nuclear power plant, are less than happy, with Entergy also reneging on prior commitments to cover eventual plant decommissioning costs, potentially stranding taxpayers with much of the bill.

Crossing the Wayúu: Pipeline Divides Indigenous Lands in South America
by Jonathan Luna Special to CorpWatch
June 5th, 2008
Touted as the first step in a major regional integration project, the 225-kilometer TransCaribe pipeline travels underground across Colombia's Guajira Peninsula to the gas refineries of Maracaibo, Venezuela. Protesting the mega project's impacts on the peninsula's indigenous communities, the Wayúu community of Mashiis-Manaa is leading the struggle against oil giant Petróleos de Venezuela.

Suing the Smelter: Oklahoma Town Takes on Freeport
by Eliza StricklandSpecial to CorpWatch
May 15th, 2008
Residents of the town of Blackwell, Oklahoma have brought a class action lawsuit against mining giant Freeport McMoRan. The plaintiffs say that the company's zinc smelter, which closed in 1974, left a toxic legacy in the town, including contaminated sand from the smelter that was given away for free.

Smokestack Injustice? Toxic Texas Smelter May Reopen
by Kent PatersonSpecial to CorpWatch
April 2nd, 2008
The old American Smelting and Refining Company (Asarco) copper smelter in El Paso, Texas, which has spewed out toxins for over a century, has been granted a new five-year permit. This is despite the fact that it violates international laws by polluting communities on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border.

Ecuador's Yasuni Park: Oil Exploration or Nature Protection?
by Agneta EnströmSpecial to CorpWatch
March 20th, 2008
Permission for Petrobras of Brazil to drill for oil in Yasuni National Park, one of the most biologically diverse places in the world, has been suspended, but some damage has already been done by Swedish construction giant Skanska. Unless new money is found to protect the forest, exploration may resume.

Playing with Children's Lives: Big Tobacco in Malawi
by Pilirani Semu-BandaSpecial to CorpWatch
February 25th, 2008
Cigarettes may be damaging not only your own health, but also that of some of the world's poorest children. Much of Malawi's thriving tobacco industry rests on the backs of exploited children, some as young as five years old.

Titanium or Water? Trouble brews in Southern India
by Nityanand JayaramanSpecial to CorpWatch
October 24th, 2007
Tata, India's largest conglomerate, wants to take 10,000 acres of land to mine ilmenite in the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu. The plan has sparked protests by local villagers who say the project will destroy their traditional way of life and the environment.

Mud and the Minister: A Tale of Woe in Java
by Anton FoekSpecial to CorpWatch
July 20th, 2007
Over a year after a torrent of liquid mud at an Indonesian oil exploration site inundated four villages, killing almost 100 people, the local community is still awaiting clean-up and proper compensation. This is despite the fact that the drilling company is owned by the family of a senior Indonesian minister.

Barrick's Dirty Secrets: Communities Respond to Gold Mining's Impacts Worldwide
May 1st, 2007
A new CorpWatch report details the operations of Barrick Gold in nine different countries, focusing on the efforts on the part of the communities to seek justice from this powerful multinational.
Download Spanish version of report

Speaking Diné to Dirty Power: Navajo Challenge New Coal-Fired Plant
by Jeff ConantSpecial to CorpWatch
April 3rd, 2007
A small, but growing, group of Diné indigenous peoples in New Mexico are protesting against a planned new huge coal-fired power plant. This is one of 150 similar plants scheduled to supply an anticipated boom in energy demand in the U.S.

Merck's Murky Dealings: HPV Vaccine Lobby Backfires
by Terry J. AllenSpecial to CorpWatch
March 7th, 2007
Merck's lobbying campaign for mandatory vaccination of school girls provided funding for a prominent women's non-profit. The ensuing uproar has created a backlash against the pharmaceutical giant.

High-Tech Healthcare in Iraq, Minus the Healthcare
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
January 8th, 2007
Almost four years after the toppling of Saddam Hussein, Iraq’s healthcare system is still a shambles. While most hospitals lack basic supplies, dozens of incomplete clinics and warehoused high-technology equipment remain as a testament to the failed U.S. experiment to reconstruct of Iraq. First in a series of CorpWatch articles.

Vedanta Undermines Indian Communities
by Nityanand JayaramanSpecial to Corpwatch
November 15th, 2005
Vedanta, a fast growing British mining and aluminium production company founded by a billionaire expatriate Bombay businessman, threatens communities in India with environmental degradation and widespread pollution.

Religious Right Discovers Investment Activism
by Cynthia L. CooperSpecial to CorpWatch
August 3rd, 2005
A tiny, but effective, religious right financial movement is using fundamentalist values and shareolder activism to push conservative evangelism into corporate suites.

Adding Insult to Injury
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
May 24th, 2005
Many Halliburton contractors leave Iraq with debilitating injuries and deep psychological scars. Then they return home only to find that the insurance they need to rebuild their lives is out of reach.

Exporting Cures, Importing Misery
by By Stan CoxAlterNet
January 19th, 2005
The Kazipally industrial area – once good farm country – now accounts for more than one-third of India's pharmaceutical industry, meaning skyrocketing rates of cancer, heart disease and birth defects for its residents.

Dynamite in the Center of Town
by Joshua KarlinerSpecial to CorpWatch
December 2nd, 2004
In 1984 the world's largest industrial disaster killed 8,000 people over night in Bhopal, India. Two decades later, some sort of closure might seem called for. But today survivors groups continue to struggle for justice, while the chemical industry promotes volunteer initiatives.

Sweet and Sour
by Jim LobeSpecial to CorpWatch
June 23rd, 2004
A new report from Human Rights Watch reveals that American corporations such as Coca-Cola may be getting sugar from plantations in El Salvador that employ child labor.

Barren Justice
by Sasha LilleySpecial to CorpWatch
May 13th, 2004
Nicaraguan banana workers have been struggling for compensation from Dole Fruit, Shell, and Dow Chemical for exposure to the pesticide DBCP. The obstacles to justice are many, including the US courts, powerful lobbies, and free trade agreements.

Poison and Profits
by Chris ThompsonEast Bay Express
April 7th, 2004
First California semiconductor firm AXT, Inc. exposed its workers to arsenic. Then it fired them and sent their jobs to China.

Bhopal Survivors Confront Dow
by Helene VostersSpecial to CorpWatch
May 15th, 2003
Almost 19 years after the Bhopal gas disaster in India, survivors still seek Justice. Recently they confronted the CEO of Dow Chemical at a shareholders' meeting.

International Tobacco Treaty: Public Health Advocates Face an Uphill Battle
by Clive BatesSpecial to CorpWatch
October 15th, 2002
Can public interest groups salvage an international treaty aimed at regulating Big Tobacco? The director of an anti-tobacco group says they have their work cut out for them.

Trading in Disaster
by Nityanand Jayaraman and Kenny BrunoSpecial to CorpWatch
February 6th, 2002
30,000 tons of possibly contaminated steel scrap from the twin towers has been exported to India. The shipments raise serious public health concerns.

Bhopal's Legacy
by Sandhya SrinivasanSpecial to CorpWatch
December 6th, 2001
Seventeen years after the Bhopal disaster, survivors still seek justice and environmental health regulations go unenforced.

MITSUBISHI: The Most Environmentally Destructive Corporate Force on Earth
by Joshua KarlinerCorpWatch
December 1st, 1997
The best known, most prestigious, and largest keiretsu, is the Mitsubishi Group of companies. Given the size and reach of its diverse activities, and due to the fact that it is more heavily focused in polluting industrial sectors than other keiretsu, the Mitsubishi Group may well be the single most environmentally destructive corporate force on Earth.

Tobacco's Global Ghettos: Big Tobacco Targets The World's Poor
by Carol McGruderSan Francisco African American Tobacco Free Project
June 30th, 1997
With daily reportage and media coverage chronicling the first chinks in the once seemingly impenetrable armor of Big Tobacco, the general public might get the very erroneous impression that Big Tobacco is going down for the count. Nothing could be further from the truth. To the average person the $300-$400 billion dollar ''global'' settlement that is currently being bandied about seems like an awful lot of money. To those of us in the tobacco control business, we know it is but a drop in the ocean to Big Tobacco, and a small price to pay to ensure that they will be able to continue business as usual in the rest of the world. The Tobacco Industry won't even flinch as they write the check.