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CorpWatch Exclusives : Displaying 21-40 of 49


World Economic Forum Protests Pose New Challenges for Anti-Globalization Movements
by Kenny BrunoCorpWatch
January 29th, 2002
Will demonstrators show that anti-corporate sentiment is alive and well? We look at the issues raised by the World Economic Forum in New York and the World Social Forum in Brazil.

Fast Track Passage Won't Defeat the ''Seattle Coalition''
by Sarah Anderson and John CavanaghInstitute for Policy Studies
December 6th, 2001
Fast Track trade authority has squeaked through Congress. Analysts from the Institute for Policy Studies say it is one set back among many victories in a battle that is far from over.

The Meaning of Doha
by Walden Bello and Anuradha MittalFocus on the Global South and Food First
November 15th, 2001
Two activist-scholars set the record straight on what was gained and what was lost at the recent WTO summit in Qatar.

ENGLAND: The WTO's Hidden Agenda
by Gregory PalastSpecial to CorpWatch
November 9th, 2001
Confidential documents show top corporate executives met secretly with government officials to set the pro-business agenda for the current WTO talks. This may be the smoking gun that proves corporate collusion in the WTO process.

Prelude to Doha: Northern Countries Try to Ram Through Agenda
by Martin KhorSpecial to CorpWatch
November 9th, 2001
WTO officials and delegates from the US and EU try to strong arm developing countries into accepting a new round of trade negotiations.

War Profiteering: Bayer, Anthrax and International Trade
by Kavaljit SinghAsia-Europe Dialogue Project
November 5th, 2001
US officials have refused to bust Bayer's monopoly on anthrax drugs, even though generic drugs would save $millions. Bayer's patent was protected under the WTO. Now those rights are challenged.

WTO and the Fate of the World's Forests
by Victor MenottiSpecial to CorpWatch
November 1st, 2001
At stake in upcoming WTO negotiations is the question of who will control and benefit from the world's forests.

The WTO, Forests and the Spirit of Rio
by Ricardo CarrereSpecial to CorpWatch
November 1st, 2001
Rainforest activist Ricardo Carrere argues that it's time to reject free trade and return to the environmental principles that guided the 1992 Earth Summit.

ENRON: Washington's Number One Behind-the-Scenes GATS Negotiator
by Tony ClarkeSpecial to CorpWatch
October 25th, 2001
Tony Clarke, looks at how Enron, the largest service provider in the world, uses its clout to shape WTO talks on cross-border trade in services.

After Carlo Giuliani, Peaceful Protests Must Continue
by Kenny BrunoSpecial to CorpWatch
July 25th, 2001
The highly publicized killing of Carlo Giuliani during the protests in Genoa on Friday, July 19th may mark a milestone for the anti-corporate globalization movement as significant as the Battle in Seattle.

G8: Are You Happy?
by Susan GeorgeSpecial to CorpWatch
July 24th, 2001
The movement for a different kind of globalization is in danger. Either we expose what the police are actually up to and prevent the violence of the few, or we risk shattering the greatest political hope in the last several decades.

Quebec: One More Crack in the Wall
by Sarah AndersonSpecial to CorpWatch
April 23rd, 2001
QUEBEC CITY -- ''Excuse me, but is this Canada?'' Scrawled on the ''Wall of Shame,'' a 10-foot high, 2 and a half mile long fence erected to keep protesters away from George Bush and 33 other leaders gathered at the Summit of the Americas, the slogan just about says it all.

Zapatistas: Bad For Business
by Martin EspinozaSpecial to CorpWatch
March 22nd, 2001
Are the Zapatistas winning the war of ideas against neoliberalism and free trade?

This Is What Democracy Looks Like
by Kenny BrunoSpecial to CorpWatch
January 28th, 2001
Thousands gather in Porto Alegre, Brazil to look towards a future in which corporations no longer rule.

The Promise of Porto Alegre
by Ignacio RamonetLe Monde Diplomatique
The new century is starting in Porto Alegre. All kinds of people, each in their own ways, have been contesting and critiquing neo-liberal globalisation, and many of them will be gathering in this southern Brazilian city on 25-30 January for the first World Social Forum. This time they won't just be protesting -- as they were in Seattle, Washington, Prague and elsewhere -- against the world-wide injustices, inequalities and disasters created by the excesses of capitalism (see the article by Bernard Cassen).

The Struggle for a Deglobalized World
by Walden BelloFocus on the Global South
September 6th, 2000
In the mid-nineties, the WTO had been sold to the global public as the lynchpin of a multilateral system of economic governance that would provide the necessary rules to facilitate the growth of global trade and the spread of its beneficial effects.

US: Against China PNTR
by Russell Mokhiber and Robert WeissmanFocus on the Corporation
May 22nd, 2000
The debate over whether the U.S. Congress should grant Permanent Normal Trade Relations (PNTR, formerly known as permanent most favored nation) status is about many things, but none more important than this basic question.

US: Don't Bash China
by Walden Bello and Anuradha MittalInstitute for Food and Development Policy/Food First
May 1st, 2000
The anti-China trade campaign amounts to a Faustian bargain that seeks to buy some space for US organized labor at the expense of real solidarity with workers and progressive worker and environmental movements globally against transnational capital.

WTO: Watershed for Alternative Media
by Julie LightMedia Alliance
April 1st, 2000
There are watershed moments in which world events and popular perceptions of them are changed. The week of protests at the World Trade Organization meeting in Seattle last year was indisputably such a moment.

Where was the Color in Seattle?
by Elizabeth (Betita) MartinezColorlines
February 1st, 2000
In the vast acreage of published analysis about the splendid victory over the World Trade Organization last November 29-December 3, it is almost impossible to find anyone wondering why the 40-50,000 demonstrators were overwhelmingly Anglo.