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CorpWatch Exclusives

EuroZone Profiteers: Ireland
November 13th, 2013
This profile of Ireland is from CorpWatch's EuroZone Profiteers report - a study of the the role of six major banks in Greece, Ireland and Spain during the EuroZone crisis. Loans from these banks helped fuel the credit boom that left borrowing countries deep in debt.

EuroZone Profiteers: Greece
November 13th, 2013
This profile of Westdeutsche Landesbank is from CorpWatch's EuroZone Profiteers report which investigates the role of six major banks in Greece, Ireland and Spain during the EuroZone crisis. Loans from these banks helped fuel the credit boom that left the countries deep in debt.

EuroZone Profiteers: Spain
November 13th, 2013
This profile of Spain is from CorpWatch's EuroZone Profiteers report which investigates the role of six major banks in Greece, Ireland and Spain during the EuroZone crisis. Loans from these banks helped fuel the credit boom that left the countries deep in debt.

EuroZone Profiteers: Dexia
November 13th, 2013
This profile of Dexia is from CorpWatch's EuroZone Profiteers report which investigates the role of six major banks in Greece, Ireland and Spain during the EuroZone crisis. Loans from these banks helped fuel the credit boom that left the countries deep in debt.

EuroZone Profiteers: Crédit Agricole
November 13th, 2013
This profile of Crédit Agricole is from CorpWatch's EuroZone Profiteers report which investigates the role of six major banks in Greece, Ireland and Spain during the EuroZone crisis. Loans from these banks helped fuel the credit boom that left the countries deep in debt.

EuroZone Profiteers: French Banking
November 13th, 2013
This profile of French banking is from CorpWatch's EuroZone Profiteers report which investigates the role of six major banks in Greece, Ireland and Spain during the EuroZone crisis. Loans from these banks helped fuel the credit boom that left the countries deep in debt.

EuroZone Profiteers: Commerzbank
November 13th, 2013
This profile of Commerzbank/Eurohypo is from CorpWatch's EuroZone Profiteers report which investigates the role of six major banks in Greece, Ireland and Spain during the EuroZone crisis. Loans from these banks helped fuel the credit boom that left the countries deep in debt.

EuroZone Profiteers: Depfa and Hypo Real Estate
November 13th, 2013
This profile of Depfa/Hypo Real Estate is from CorpWatch's EuroZone Profiteers report - a study of the the role of six major banks in Greece, Ireland and Spain during the EuroZone crisis. Loans from these banks helped fuel the credit boom that left borrowing countries deep in debt.

EuroZone Profiteers: Westdeutsche Landesbank
November 13th, 2013
This profile of Westdeutsche Landesbank is from CorpWatch's EuroZone Profiteers report which investigates the role of six major banks in Greece, Ireland and Spain during the EuroZone crisis. Loans from these banks helped fuel the credit boom that left the countries deep in debt.

EuroZone Profiteers: German Banking
November 13th, 2013
This profile of German banking is from CorpWatch's EuroZone Profiteers report which investigates the role of six major banks in Greece, Ireland and Spain during the EuroZone crisis. Loans from these banks helped fuel the credit boom that left the countries deep in debt.

EuroZone Profiteers: Time to Investigate the Bankers and Bureaucrats
November 13th, 2013
Conclusion to a new CorpWatch report that shines a light on the role of six major banks in Greece, Ireland and Spain in the EuroZone crisis that left borrowing countries deep in debt.

EuroZone Profiteers: Odious Debt
November 13th, 2013
A new CorpWatch report shines a light on the role of six major banks that helped cause the EuroZone crisis. As of June 2013, Greece was forced to borrow €207 billion, Spain €100 billion, and Ireland an additional €85 billion, partly because of risky lending by major banks.

EuroZone Profiteers: Lending Frenzy
November 13th, 2013
European Union bureaucrats convinced major banks in Europe to compete with each other, a push helped fuel the EuroZone crisis. But as E.U. Competition Commissioner Mario Monti firly believed that competition would "reward greater efficiency."

EuroZone Profiteers: Who Owes Whom?
November 13th, 2013
Introduction to a new CorpWatch report that shines a light on the role of six major banks in Greece, Ireland and Spain in the EuroZone crisis. “The EuroZone Profiteers” profiles Commerzbank, Depfa and Westdeutsche Landesbank from Germany; Crédit Agricole and Société Générale from France; together with Dexia – a Franco-Belgian financial institution.

EuroZone Profiteers: Welcome to the Casino
November 13th, 2013
Introduction to a new CorpWatch report that shines a light on the role of six major banks in Greece, Ireland and Spain in the EuroZone crisis. “The EuroZone Profiteers” profiles Commerzbank, Depfa and Westdeutsche Landesbank from Germany; Crédit Agricole and Société Générale from France; together with Dexia – a Franco-Belgian financial institution.

The EuroZone Profiteers
November 13th, 2013
A new CorpWatch report shines a light on the role of six major banks in Greece, Ireland and Spain in the EuroZone crisis. “The EuroZone Profiteers” profiles Commerzbank, Depfa and Westdeutsche Landesbank from Germany; Crédit Agricole and Société Générale from France; together with Dexia – a Franco-Belgian financial institution.

Ukraine Egg King Global Plans Fail North Carolina Farmers
by Puck LoCorpWatch Blog
May 10th, 2013
Farmers in North Carolina are regretting the day that they put their trust in the Egg King - Oleg Bakhmatyuk – a billionaire agricultural investor from the Ukraine. Over 100 farmers are suing a subsidiary of his global empire for almost $10 million for reneging on chicken sales contracts.

Global Ambulance Chasers: Lawyers Profit From Suing States for Multinationals
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
December 17th, 2012
Dozens of highly paid international lawyers are pocketing millions of dollars in fees from multinational corporations to sue governments in secretive “arbitration tribunals” for profits they claim to be owed under international investment treaties, according to “Profiting from Injustice,” a new report from Corporate Europe Observatory and Transnational Institute.

The True Cost of Chevron: An Alternative Annual Report
by Antonia JuhaszTrue Cost of Chevron
May 25th, 2010
Chevron's 2009 Annual Report celebrates 130 years of Chevron operations. We, the communities and our allies who bear the consequences of Chevron's offshore drilling rigs, oil and natural gas production, coal fields, refineries, depots, pipelines, exploration, chemical plants, political control, consumer abuse, false promises, and much more, have a very different account to offer.

ADM's New Frontiers: Palm Oil Deforestation and Child Labor
by Charlie CraySpecial to CorpWatch
May 18th, 2010
ADM has moved beyond the days of blatant price-fixing that landed its top execs behind bars. But the company's forays into new global agricultural markets bring charges of complicity in forced child labor and rampant deforestation. Critics assert that the conglomerate's embrace of self- regulation and voluntary guidelines is but a cynical ploy to deter effective reform.

BP: Beyond Petroleum or Beyond Preposterous? (2000)
by Kenny Bruno
May 12th, 2010
In 2000 British Petroleum launched an expensive ad campaign, re-branding its corporate image into the eco-friendly "BP: Beyond Petroleum.” We said it then. When a company spends more on advertising its environmental friendliness than on environmental actions, that's greenwash. Three long weeks into the BP oil disaster roiling the Gulf of Mexico, CorpWatch's December 2000 skewering of its new image sadly, bears repeating.

Protesters in Eastern India Battle Against Mining Giant Arcelor Mittal
by Moushumi BasuSpecial to CorpWatch
March 2nd, 2010
In the rural, tribal lands of Eastern India, protesters are going head-to-head with world steel giant Arcelor Mittal. “We may give away our lives, but we will not part with an inch of our ancestral land," the villagers cry. "The forest, rivers and land are ours. We don't want factories, steel or iron. Arcelor Mittal Go Back.”

The Enbridge Oil Sands Gamble
by Andrew NikiforukSpecial to CorpWatch
December 14th, 2009
Patrick Daniel, the CEO of Enbridge Inc, is bullish about the future of unconventional oil from Canada’s massive tar sand deposits. His company not only operates North America’s longest crude oil and liquid pipelines, but transports 12 percent of the oil that the U.S. imports daily. Canada’s bitumen, or dirty crude, lies under a forest area the size of England and is arguably the world’s last remaining giant oil field.

Bhopal: Generations of Poison
by Nityanand JayaramanSpecial to CorpWatch
December 2nd, 2009
On the night of December 2-3, 1984, the Union Carbide pesticide factory in Bhopal, India leaked poisonous methyl iso cyanate into its densely populated neighborhood, killing 8,000 people in the immediate aftermath. 25 years later, Dow Chemical (which purchased Union Carbide in 2001) still refuses to clean up the site. But a new generation of Bhopal survivors is taking on the fight.

CorpWatch Announces Version 2.0 of the CrocTail Corporate Subsidiaries Database and Open API
Special to CorpWatch
November 24th, 2009
Developed with support from the Sunlight Foundation, CrocTail provides an interface for browsing information about several hundred thousand corporations publicly traded in the U.S. and their domestic and foreign subsidiaries. In this new version, users can click on different years and see how subsidiary relationships for a company have changed over time.

Black & Veatch's Tarakhil Power Plant: White Elephant in Kabul
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
November 19th, 2009
In a secluded valley a few miles from Kabul's international airport, $285 million in U.S. taxpayer dollars have flowed into a Black & Veatch-built power plant outside Tarakhil village. But, far from the public relations coup the project was intended to supply, the plant has run into problems with planning, cost over-runs and alleged corruption.

Damming Magdalena: Emgesa Threatens Colombian Communities
by Jonathan LunaSpecial to CorpWatch
July 21st, 2009
Near the town of La Jagua, overlooking the Magdalena River, the landscape is dotted with concrete markers declaring the land, river, and everything else a “public utility” that Colombia has given to the energy company Emgesa as part of the Quimbo Hydroelectric Project. A construction permit was granted in May, with the dam scheduled for full operation by 2014.

Obama's Tax Haven Reform: Chump Change
by Charlie CraySpecial to CorpWatch
June 15th, 2009
In early May, the Obama administration announced plans to eliminate the advantages that multinationals have over domestic corporations as to the tax treatment of reinvested profits. K Street corporate lobbyists haven’t squealed so loudly since they lost their three martini lunches. The uproar draws attention away from the fact that U.S. multinationals enjoy an effective tax rate of just 2.4 percent on billions of dollars in foreign active earnings.

CorpWatch announces release of the CrocTail application and open CorpWatch API
June 8th, 2009
CorpWatch, with support from the Sunlight Foundation, announces release of the CrocTail application and open CorpWatch API. CrocTail provides an interface for browsing information about U.S. publicly traded corporations and their many foreign and domestic subsidiaries. CrocTail also serves as a demonstration of the features and data available through the CorpWatch API.

The True Cost of Chevron: An Alternative Annual Report
by Antonia Juhaszhttp://www.TrueCostofChevron.com/
May 26th, 2009
Chevron's 2008 annual report is a glossy celebration of the company's most profitable year in its history. What Chevron's annual report does not tell its shareholders is the true cost paid for those financial returns, or the global movement gaining voice and strength against the company's abuses. This jointly-produced report documents negative impacts of Chevron's operations around the globe, in stark contrast to the message sent by the company's ubiquitous "Human Energy" advertising campaign.

Mexico’s Other Crisis: Foreign Banks
by Kent PatersonSpecial to CorpWatch
May 15th, 2009
The worldwide financial crisis is hitting people in the Global South with particular venom, and disaster profiteering is alive and well. Take Mexico. While entities like Citigroup-owned Banamex get away with charging Mexican credit account-holders usurious interest rates of up to 100 percent, Banamex itself turned nearly $1 billion in profits in 2008.

Goa Cursed By Its Mineral Wealth
by Emily BildSpecial to CorpWatch
April 23rd, 2009
Set on India's west coast, Goa is renowned as a beach paradise popular with Indian and foreign tourists alike. Just a few miles inland from the quaint restaurants and the pristine waves lapping the silver shores of India's smallest state, iron-ore mining is destroying the environment, say activists and locals.

Regulating Ramatex: Authorities Shut Out as Malaysian Investor Threatens Namibian Environment
by Moses MagadzaSpecial to CorpWatch
April 5th, 2009
For nearly six years Ramatex Textile and Garment Factory barred government regulators from entering industrial premises leased from the City of Windhoek. Ramatex came to Namibia in 2001, lured by the newly implemented African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA). Evidence of environmental violations finally emerged after the company absconded.

Policing Afghanistan: Obama's New Strategy
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
March 23rd, 2009
A new strategy for Afghanistan and Pakistan will be unveiled by President Barack Obama this week. It plans to ramp up the training of the Afghan army and police at a cost of some $2 billion a year. Private contractor DynCorp is already lining up to bid for some of the lucrative contracts. This article provides an overview of key reports assessing the training of the Afghan police, and DynCorp's role, to date.

Inheriting Halliburton's Army: What Will Obama Do With KBR?
by Pratap ChatterjeeTomDispatch.com
February 22nd, 2009
President Obama will almost certainly touch down in Baghdad and Kabul in Air Force One sometime in the coming year to meet his counterparts in Iraq and Afghanistan, and he will just as certainly pay a visit to a U.S. military base or two. Should he stay to eat with the troops, he will no less certainly choose from a menu prepared by migrant Asian workers under contract to Houston-based KBR, the former subsidiary of Halliburton.

Xstrata Dreaming: The Struggle of Aboriginal Australians against a Swiss Mining Giant
by Michael DeibertSpecial to CorpWatch
February 16th, 2009
The McArthur River winds through Australia’s remote Northern Territory, home to four main Aboriginal linguistic groups: the Gurdanji, Yanyuwa, Garawa and Mara. Earlier this month Australian Minister for Environment Peter Garrett announced conditional approval for a bid by Swiss mining giant Xstrata to expand its zinc mining operations in the sacred McArthur River floodplain.

Norilsk Nickel: A Tale of Unbridled Capitalism, Russian Style
by Anton FoekSpecial to CorpWatch
October 9th, 2008
The launch of Russia’s stock markets in the early 90s and privatization of state assets has profoundly impacted Russian society. As the case of mining giant Norilsk Nickel illustrates, this experiment has given rise to both immense personal wealth for a new elite, and economic uncertainty for the ordinary citizen.

Toyota: Auto Industry Race to the Bottom
by Barbara BriggsSpecial to CorpWatch
September 16th, 2008
Globally, Toyota is known for its innovation and quality of products like the Prius hybrid. A closer look at operations in Japan, the Philippines, Myanmar and the U.S. reveals a story of extreme working conditions, union-busting and other corporate abuses. In Japan and elsewhere, workers are speaking out.

Dark Side of the Tourist Boom: Cruise Ship Controversies Cross Borders
by Kent PatersonSpecial to CorpWatch
July 9th, 2008
The Mexican Pacific resort of Zihuatanejo recently cancelled a major new cruise ship terminal, giving a victory to environmental activists and other opponents. However, Mexico remains the world’s Number One cruise ship destination; and with little regulation, allegations of onboard crime, and increasing militarization as regards security while ships are in port, the rapidly expanding industry is facing new challenges.

A Glittering Demon: Mining, Poverty and Politics in the Democratic Republic of Congo
by Michael DeibertSpecial to CorpWatch
June 26th, 2008
In the DRC, a nation rich in natural resources yet confounded by civil war and endemic poverty, artisanal mining communities are struggling for their livelihoods as foreign multinationals like AngloGold Ashanti rush to cash in.

Booming Chinese Demand Has Ripples Down Under In Queensland
by Patrick O'KeeffeSpecial to CorpWatch
April 16th, 2008
A bauxite mine and a proposed refinery in northern Queensland, Australia, to be developed by a Chinese mineral company, has divided local and traditional landowners. Part of a major industrialization scheme, it has also sparked worries among environmentalists.

Playing with Children's Lives: Big Tobacco in Malawi
by Pilirani Semu-BandaSpecial to CorpWatch
February 25th, 2008
Cigarettes may be damaging not only your own health, but also that of some of the world's poorest children. Much of Malawi's thriving tobacco industry rests on the backs of exploited children, some as young as five years old.

An Uncomfortable Spotlight in Davos
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
January 31st, 2008
The CEOs of three-quarters of the world's 100 largest companies have just completed an uncomfortable weekend at the tiny Swiss ski resort of Davos, while their companies' share prices nosedived on global stock markets, amid concern that the U.S. economy is staggering towards recession.

Titanium or Water? Trouble brews in Southern India
by Nityanand JayaramanSpecial to CorpWatch
October 24th, 2007
Tata, India's largest conglomerate, wants to take 10,000 acres of land to mine ilmenite in the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu. The plan has sparked protests by local villagers who say the project will destroy their traditional way of life and the environment.

Lessons of Empire: India, 60 Years After Independence
by Nick Robins and Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
August 14th, 2007
60 years after India gained independence, British capital is still exploiting poor communities in its former colony. Centuries after Britain's East India Company -- the world's first multinational -- faced protests in London, a group of villagers continue the tradition of resistance.

The Life and Death of a Border Town
by David MartinezSpecial to CorpWatch
June 12th, 2007
Two towns in the Mexican border state of Coahuila discover the reality of "free trade" with the United States: Ramos Arizpe is still riding the boom in automobile production while Morelos has been abandoned by the denim manufacturers, as factories relocate to even cheaper production sites overseas.

Barrick's Dirty Secrets: Communities Respond to Gold Mining's Impacts Worldwide
May 1st, 2007
A new CorpWatch report details the operations of Barrick Gold in nine different countries, focusing on the efforts on the part of the communities to seek justice from this powerful multinational.
Download Spanish version of report

Barrick Gold Mine Transforms Pacific Island
by David MartinezSpecial to CorpWatch
February 21st, 2007
Papua New Guinea, one of the world's largest islands, has fortunes in gold under its lush green mountains and a diversity of indigenous culture. The arrival of a Canadian mining company has brought violent clashes and transformed the indigenous lands forever.

Listen to an interview with the author, David Martinez


A Proxy Battle: Shareholders vs. CEOs
by Kevin KelleherSpecial to CorpWatch
June 13th, 2006
Earnest shareholder resolutions presented at company annual general meetings on everything from human rights to executive compensation are routinely shot down in flames. But shareholder resolutions may have an effect, even in defeat.

Australia Reaps Iraqi Harvest
by Marc MoncriefSpecial to CorpWatch
April 4th, 2006
United Nations sanctions against Saddam Hussein may have failed to end his regime but they succeeded in enriching both the Iraqi dictator and corporations able to manipulate the scandal-ridden world body's Oil-for-Food program. Among the profiteers was the Australian Wheat Board, a former state-owned monopoly, which funneled over $200 million into Saddam's coffers even as the “Coalition of the Willing” was preparing for invasion.

Happy Meals, Unhappy Workers
by Aaron Glantz and Ngoc NguyenSpecial to CorpWatch
March 6th, 2006
Vietnamese workers earn less than $2 a day making stuffed animals and Happy Meal toys for U.S. consumers. An ongoing series of wildcat strikes this winter has forced the government to raise wages to prevent factories from moving to other countries.

Listen to an interview about this article with Aaron Glantz on CorpWatch Radio.


Some Strings Attached: Cotton, Farm subsidies tie up global trade talks
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
December 13th, 2005
West African cotton farmers are among those hardest hit by government subsidized corporate agriculture. This week in Hong Kong, trade ministers from the 148 members of the World Trade Organization meet to discusss this and other global free trade issues.

Vedanta Undermines Indian Communities
by Nityanand JayaramanSpecial to Corpwatch
November 15th, 2005
Vedanta, a fast growing British mining and aluminium production company founded by a billionaire expatriate Bombay businessman, threatens communities in India with environmental degradation and widespread pollution.

Mixing Occuption and Oil in Western Sahara
by Jacob MundySpecial to CorpWatch
July 21st, 2005
Oklahoma-based Kerr-McGee's contract with Morocco to explore for oil and gain in the contested territory on the Atlantic coast of northern Africa is complicating a 30 year independence struggle.

'Tis the Season for Shareholder Activism
by Jan FrelSpecial to CorpWatch
May 4th, 2005
Every spring, activists and investors attend annual general meetings to protest and meet face-to-face with CEOs and corporate boards. The goal is to place their agendas -- on everything from the environment to labor practices -- front and center.

Jordan's Sweatshops: The Carrot or the Stick of US Policy?
by Aaron GlantzSpecial to CorpWatch
February 26th, 2003
While the world braces for a US war against Iraq, Washington is using its newly inked Free Trade Agreement with Jordan to open sweatshops and secure an ally in the region.

World Contrasts
by Eduardo Galeanowww.portoalegre2003.org
January 16th, 2003
Next week, thousands will descend on Porto Alegre, Brazil for the World Social Forum, under the slogan "Another World is Possible." We thought these reflections by Uruguayan writer Eduardo Galeano on the world as it is today were a good place to start.

PPP: Plan Puebla Panama, or Private Plans for Profit?
by Miguel PickardSpecial to CorpWatch
September 19th, 2002
A primer on the development scheme that would turn southern Mexico and all of Central America into a giant export zone.

September 11th Didn't Change Everything
by Kenny BrunoCorpWatch
September 10th, 2002
A New Yorker looks at the squandered opportunities to make desperately needed changes in the American psyche and global policy following last September 11th.

A Tale of Two Coups: Venezuela and Argentina
by Greg PalastNew Internationalist Magazine
July 3rd, 2002
April's big business-led coup in Venezuela failed, where international finance's coup in Argentina in recent months has succeeded. Greg Palast gives us the inside track on two very different power-grabs.

Globalizing Hope
by Joshua KarlinerCorpWatch
February 6th, 2002
The only way to really describe the World Social Forum that just ended in Brazil is a global political ''carnaval.''

World Economic Forum Protests Pose New Challenges for Anti-Globalization Movements
by Kenny BrunoCorpWatch
January 29th, 2002
Will demonstrators show that anti-corporate sentiment is alive and well? We look at the issues raised by the World Economic Forum in New York and the World Social Forum in Brazil.

Where Do We Go From Here?
by Joshua KarlinerCorpWatch
October 11th, 2001
CorpWatch Director Joshua Karliner looks at the challenges facing the anti-corporate globalization movement since the WTC attack.

Immigration and Globalization: The UN Conference Against Racism Takes on Migrant Issues
by Catherine TactaquinSpecial to CorpWatch
August 30th, 2001
The World Conference on Racism in Durban spotlights many insidious forms of racism, including anti-immigrant activity.

After Carlo Giuliani, Peaceful Protests Must Continue
by Kenny BrunoSpecial to CorpWatch
July 25th, 2001
The highly publicized killing of Carlo Giuliani during the protests in Genoa on Friday, July 19th may mark a milestone for the anti-corporate globalization movement as significant as the Battle in Seattle.

G8: Are You Happy?
by Susan GeorgeSpecial to CorpWatch
July 24th, 2001
The movement for a different kind of globalization is in danger. Either we expose what the police are actually up to and prevent the violence of the few, or we risk shattering the greatest political hope in the last several decades.

Zapatistas: Bad For Business
by Martin EspinozaSpecial to CorpWatch
March 22nd, 2001
Are the Zapatistas winning the war of ideas against neoliberalism and free trade?

The Promise of Porto Alegre
by Ignacio RamonetLe Monde Diplomatique
The new century is starting in Porto Alegre. All kinds of people, each in their own ways, have been contesting and critiquing neo-liberal globalisation, and many of them will be gathering in this southern Brazilian city on 25-30 January for the first World Social Forum. This time they won't just be protesting -- as they were in Seattle, Washington, Prague and elsewhere -- against the world-wide injustices, inequalities and disasters created by the excesses of capitalism (see the article by Bernard Cassen).

From Melbourne to Prague: the Struggle for a Deglobalized World
by Walden BelloFocus on the Global South
September 6th, 2000
Walden Bello delivered this speech at a series of engagements on the occasion of demonstrations against the World Economic Forum (Davos) in Melbourne, Australia, 6-10 September 2000.

The Struggle for a Deglobalized World
by Walden BelloFocus on the Global South
September 6th, 2000
In the mid-nineties, the WTO had been sold to the global public as the lynchpin of a multilateral system of economic governance that would provide the necessary rules to facilitate the growth of global trade and the spread of its beneficial effects.

Activists from the Developing World See D.C. Events as a Watershed in Global Solidarity
by Julie LightSpecial to CorpWatch
April 17th, 2000
If you ask a Mexican farmer, Indian civil servant, Filipina garment worker, Bolivian miner or South African student what structural adjustment is, chances are they would be able to explain IMF and World Bank mandated belt tightening because their lives have been touched by it.

The World Bank Takes More Than it Gives
by Julie LightCorpWatch
April 14th, 2000
Dr. Vineeta Gupta is a physician and human rights activist based in Punjab, India. She has focused her efforts on World Bank efforts to privatize healthcare in Punjab. According to Dr. Gupta, the result of World Bank policies has not been greater access to healthcare.

Where was the Color in Seattle?
by Elizabeth (Betita) MartinezColorlines
February 1st, 2000
In the vast acreage of published analysis about the splendid victory over the World Trade Organization last November 29-December 3, it is almost impossible to find anyone wondering why the 40-50,000 demonstrators were overwhelmingly Anglo.

The Historic Significance of Seattle
by Vandana ShivaResearch Foundation for Science, Technology and Ecology
December 10th, 1999
The failure of the WTO Ministerial meeting in Seattle was a historic watershed, in more than one way. Firstly, it has demonstrated that globalisation is not an inevitable phenomena which must be accepted at all costs but a political project which can be responded to politically.

Engendering Change
by Julie LightSpecial to CorpWatch
June 26th, 1999
For women working in Mexican assembly plants, known as maquiladoras, insisting on their legal rights takes what are colloquially referred to as cojones. It indicates that Mexico's low wage feminine labor force may not be as docile as foreign employers would like to believe. It also is a harbinger of an incipient movement inside Mexico's expanding export-processing sector.

Tijuana Police Defy Court Protection of Maquiladora Strike
by David BaconSpecial to CorpWatch
May 16th, 1999
TIJUANA -- For two weeks, Tijuana has teetered on the brink of official lawlessness, as city and state police continue to defy Baja California's legal system. Raul Ramirez, member of the Baja California Academy of Human Rights, warned last week that ''the state is in danger of violating the Constitution and the Federal Labor Law... as it succumbs to the temptation to use force.''

MEXICO: Standing up for Health Rights on the Job
Special to CorpWatch
May 1st, 1999
First hand accounts of two workers who sued a San Diego-based medical manufacturer after a workplace accident.

MEXICO: University Professors Photos Draw the Wrath of Border Industrialists
by Julie LightSpecial to CorpWatch
April 29th, 1999
It wasn't just the politically provocative photographs that got Fred Lonidier's exhibit at Tijuana's public university taken down. It was the fact that he had the audacity to leaflet maquiladora workers outside the factory gates and invite them to the gallery that got his show yanked.

MITSUBISHI: The Most Environmentally Destructive Corporate Force on Earth
by Joshua KarlinerCorpWatch
December 1st, 1997
The best known, most prestigious, and largest keiretsu, is the Mitsubishi Group of companies. Given the size and reach of its diverse activities, and due to the fact that it is more heavily focused in polluting industrial sectors than other keiretsu, the Mitsubishi Group may well be the single most environmentally destructive corporate force on Earth.