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US: Big Test Looms for Prosecutors at Enron Trial
by Kurt EichenwaldThe New York Times
January 26th, 2006
"For the government, if they lose the Enron case, it will be seen as a symbolic failure of their rather significant campaign against white-collar crime," said John C. Coffee Jr., a professor at Columbia Law School. "It will be seen as some evidence that some cases are too complicated to be brought into the criminal justice process."

US: Hard Times Haunt Enron's Ex-Workers
by Simon RomeroThe New York Times
January 25th, 2006
For Angelique Chappell, a former administrative assistant at Enron, it all now seems like a mirage.

US: Taking Enron to Task
by Carrie JohnsonWashington Post
January 18th, 2006
Sean M. Berkowitz and a small group of government lawyers will be in the spotlight in the Jan. 30 trial of Enron's former leaders. The case is the capstone in the cleanup after an era of business misconduct that left investors billions of dollars poorer. The outcome could shape the public's -- and history's -- judgment of how effective it was.

US: Prosecutors Shift Focus on Enron
by Alexei BarrionuevoThe New York Times
January 11th, 2006
Government lawyers who will try the case against Enron's former chief executives, Kenneth L. Lay and Jeffrey K. Skilling, have signaled that they intend to spend less time befuddling jurors with talk of Enron's accounting.

US: Call It the Deal of a Lifetime
by Landon Thomas, Jr.The New York Times
January 8th, 2006
It has been a wrenching professional and personal reversal for Michael Kopper, who three years ago became the first Enron executive to plead guilty to criminal charges and cut a deal with the government. Mr. Kopper was also the first high-ranking Enron employee to publicly admit to lying and stealing - in his case, more than $16 million - from the company.

US: Four Years Later, Enron's Shadow Lingers as Change Comes Slowly
by Stephen LabatonThe New York Times
January 5th, 2006
Four years after the company's ignominious collapse, Enron's former top executives are about to head to a climactic criminal trial later this month, serving as a reminder that changes in the behavior of many American companies have been more muted than many once expected.

US: Enron Prosecutors, After Plea Bargain, Can Reduce Technical Jargon in Trial
by John R. EmshwillerThe Wall Street Journal
January 4th, 2006
The plea bargain last week by former Enron Chief Accounting Officer Richard Causey gives federal prosecutors the chance to present a shorter and less technical case against former company Chairman Kenneth Lay and former President Jeffrey Skilling. The pair's trial on conspiracy, fraud and other charges is scheduled to start in Houston on Jan. 30.

US: U.S. says Skilling mislead the SEC
CNN
January 4th, 2006
Prosecutors intend to argue that former Enron CEO Jeff Skilling attempted to deceive the Securities and Exchange Commission in a deposition he gave soon after the company's bankruptcy about his reason for selling 500,000 shares of Enron stock, according to a motion filed in a Houston federal court Tuesday.

US: Former Top Enron Accountant Pleads Guilty to Fraud
by Simon Romero and Vikas BajasThe New York Times
December 28th, 2005
The former chief accounting officer of Enron pleaded guilty today to a single felony charge of securities fraud and agreed to cooperate with federal prosecutors, giving a significant lift to the government's case against the two leading figures in the scandal over Enron's collapse.

US: J. P. Morgan Chase to Pay Investors $2.2 Billion
by Julie CreswellNew York Times
June 15th, 2005
J. P. Morgan Chase announced that it had agreed to pay $2.2 billion to Enron investors who accused the bank of participating in the accounting scandal that led to Enron's collapse.

US: Bicoastal Blues For G.M. and Ford
by Danny HakimThe New York Times
April 23rd, 2005
Setting aside its home base in the Upper Midwest, Detroit has a blue state problem -- and it is about to get worse. Washington and Oregon plan to become the 9th and 10th states to adopt California's tough car emissions rules, forming an increasingly potent market for more fuel-efficient vehicles on the West Coast and in the Northeast.

US: Firm Accused Of Asbestos Coverup Contamination Scars Montana Town
by Carrie Johnson and Dina ElBoghdadyWashington Post
February 8th, 2005
Federal prosecutors yesterday charged W.R. Grace & Co. with exposing mine workers and residents in a small mountain community in Montana to deadly asbestos and covering up the danger.

BRAZIL: Corporate Governance Takes Center Stage in Rio
by Sundeep TuckerFinancial Times
July 6th, 2004
International corporate governance will come of age this week as the world's leading activists congregate in Rio de Janeiro for the 10th annual conference of the International Corporate Governance Network, which heads to a developing country for the first time.

US: A Record Year for Shareholder Activism
by G. Jeffrey MacDonaldChristian Science Monitor
June 28th, 2004
Question: What single force can get Tyco International to strive for cleaner emissions, inspire PepsiCo to study the impact of AIDS in developing nations, and even get Merck & Co. to declare its intentions to not manufacture an abortion pill? Answer: shareholders.

US: Probe into Iraq trafficking claims
by Elise LabottCNN
May 5th, 2004
The United States is investigating reports Indian nationals were victims of human trafficking to Iraq and mistreated while working there as contractors in U.S. military camps, the State Department has said.

US: For Cruise Ships, A History of Pollution
by Edwin McDowellThe New York Times
June 16th, 2002
On April 19 the Carnival Corporation pleaded guilty in United States District Court in Miami to criminal charges related to falsifying records of the oil-contaminated bilge water that six of its ships dumped into the sea from 1996 through 2001.

US: Internal Memos Connect Enron to California Energy Crisis
by Mark MartinSan Francisco Chronicle
May 7th, 2002
Energy traders for Enron used elaborate schemes with nicknames like ''Death Star'' and''Get Shorty'' to manipulate California's electricity market and boost profits, according to internal company memos released by federal regulators Monday.

Mexico: Legislation Strikes Blow Against Privatization, Secrecy
by Dan JaffeeCommonDreams.org
April 28th, 2002
In less than 24 hours this past Wednesday, big advances for three major pieces of legislation indicated that Mexico -- for 20 years the ''model student'' of so-called free market policy reforms, and long noted for high levels of government secrecy and corruption -- may be charting a new, more independent course. At a moment when the Bush administration is chilling domestic dissent, restricting the free flow of information and promoting corporate deregulation, Mexico appears poised to do virtually the opposite.

ZAMBIA: Environmentalists Caution New Mine Investors
The Times of Zambia (Lusaka)
March 6th, 2000
A non-governmental organisation has cautioned the new mine investors not to willfully pollute the environment despite a bill which indemnifies them from litigation against environmental degradation. Citizens for a better environment, a Kitwe based NGO, warned that should the new mines violate the rights of the people to a clean environment, they would face the wrath of the public.

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