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UK: GlaxoSmithKline chief's pay package more than doubles to £6.7m
by Jill TreanorThe Guardian (UK)
March 12th, 2012
GlaxoSmithKline boss Sir Andrew Witty's pay package more than doubled to £6.7m last year – but the drugs group reckons he remains underpaid and has awarded him a new deal which could generate up to £10.4m this year.

WORLD: Top Hedge Fund Managers Took Home $13 billion In 2011
by Sam ForgioneReuters
March 1st, 2012
The top 40 highest-earning hedge fund managers took home a combined $13.2 billion, according to a Forbes magazine survey. The top 10 hedge fund managers made more than $200 million each, while the lowest earning managers made $40 million each.

US: Banks Set for Record Pay
by STEPHEN GROCERWall Street Journal
January 14th, 2010
Major U.S. banks and securities firms are on pace to pay their people about $145 billion for 2009, a record sum that indicates how compensation is climbing despite fury over Wall Street's pay culture.

US: So You Squandered Billions --- Take Another Whack At It
by Steven PerlsteinWashington Post
September 2nd, 2009
During the heyday of the credit bubble, they were the financiers who earned huge bonuses for creating, trading and investing other people's money in those complex securities that resulted in trillions of dollars in losses and brought global financial markets to their knees. Now they're out there again hustling for investors and hoping to make another score buying and trading the same securities.

US: House votes to rein in ‘excessive pay’ for company execs
by Gail Russell ChaddockChristian Science Monitor
July 31st, 2009
On Friday the U.S. House of Representativs passed a high-visibility bill to give shareholders and federal regulators a stronger hand in curbing excessive or risky executive compensation. Industry groups such as the National Association of Manufacturers opposed the bill as an overreach into private business decisions.

US: Big Banks Paid Billions in Bonuses Amid Wall St. Crisis
by Louise Story and Eric DashNew York Times
July 30th, 2009
Nine of the financial firms that were recipients of federal bailout money paid about 5,000 of their traders and bankers bonuses of more than $1 million apiece for 2008, according to a report released Thursday by the New York attorney general. The report is certain to intensify the growing debate over how, and how much, Wall Street bankers should be paid.

US/ANTIGUA: Texas Financier and Antiguan Official Charged With Fraud
by Clifford Krauss New York Times
June 19th, 2009
A U.S. Justice Department indictment unsealed Friday accused R. Allen Stanford of Stanford International Bank, based in the Caribbean money haven of Antigua, of operating a multibillion-dollar Ponzi scheme with the help of Antigua’s top banking regulator, Leroy King.

UK: Shell faces investor fury over pay, pollution and human rights
by Terry MacalisterThe Guardian
May 17th, 2009

UK: Shell at risk of investor pay revolt
by Kate Burgess and Ed CrooksFinancial Times
May 5th, 2009
Royal Dutch Shell is facing the risk of a shareholder rebellion over pay for the second successive year after two influential investor advisory groups raised concerns about discretionary pay awards made to board-level executives.

UK: Shareholders vote against RBS pay
BBC Online
April 3rd, 2009
More than 90% of Royal Bank of Scotland shareholders voted against the bank's pay and pensions policy at its annual general meeting in Edinburgh. RBS does not have to make any changes as a result, saying it was a "substantive" protest at Sir Fred Goodwin's £703,000 a year pension. Sir Philip blamed RBS's difficulties on its acquisition of the Dutch bank ABN Amro in 2007.

US: Bonus Money at Troubled A.I.G. Draws Heavy Criticism
by EDMUND L. ANDREWS and PETER BAKERNew York Times
March 15th, 2009
American International Group, which has received more than $170 billion in taxpayer bailout money, is to pay executives in the business unit that brought the company to the brink of collapse last year $165 million in bonuses. The bonuses will go forward because lawyers say the firm is contractually obligated to pay them.

US: Undisclosed Losses at Merrill Lynch Lead to a Trading Inquiry
by Louise Story and Eric DashNew York Times
March 6th, 2009
Bank of America chief executive, Kenneth D. Lewis, is trying to bridle Merrill Lynch traders, whose rush into risky investments nearly brought down the brokerage firm. But questions over the Merrill losses — in particular, who knew about them, and when — keep swirling.

UGANDA/IRAQ: Why 10,000 Ugandans are eagerly serving in Iraq
by Max DelanyChristian Science Monitor
March 6th, 2009
Hired out to multibillion-dollar companies for hundreds of dollars a month, 10,000 Ugandans risk their lives seeking fortunes protecting US Army bases, airports, and oil firms in Iraq for as little as $600 per month. Many are looking to go to Afghanistan as the Obama administration increases contracts there.

US: Ex-Leaders at Countrywide Start Firm to Buy Bad Loans
by Eric LiptonNew York Times
March 3rd, 2009
Countrywide Financial made risky loans to tens of thousands of Americans, helping set off a chain of events that has the economy staggering. So it may come as a surprise that a dozen former top Countrywide executives now stand to make millions from the home mortgage mess, buying up delinquent home mortgages that the government took over, sometimes for pennies on the dollar, at newly-formed PennyMac.

CHINA: Morgan Stanley’s Chinese Land Scandal
by David Barboza New York Times
March 1st, 2009
In a Securities and Exchange Commission filing, Morgan Stanley said it had fired an executive in its China real estate division after uncovering evidence that he might have violated the United States Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, which bars American business people from bribing foreign officials.

SWITZERLAND: UBS Names Grübel as New CEO
by Carrick MollenkampWall Street Journal
February 26th, 2009
UBS AG, the Swiss bank battered by massive write-downs and its role in a U.S. tax-evasion scheme, announced the surprise departure of chief executive Marcel Rohner. Mr. Rohner's sudden departure comes after UBS agreed earlier this month to a $780 million settlement with the U.S. Justice Department of a criminal inquiry into the bank's role in the tax evasion.

UK: Politicians pile pressure on bailed-out RBS to abandon plans for a £1bn bonus for staff
by Allegra StrattonThe Guardian (UK)
February 9th, 2009
Politicians from all sides rounded on the state-supported Royal Bank of Scotland yesterday as the row intensified over the failed bank's apparent determination to share £1bn of bonuses among staff.

US, CANADA: Business aircraft makers face severe test
by Kevin DoneFinancial Times
February 8th, 2009
Business jet makers reeling from the US political attack on some of their highest profile corporate high fliers are being forced to make drastic cuts in production and jobs in the face of the deepening global recession.

US: Bank of America Board Under Gun From Critics
by Louise Story and Julie CreswellNew York Times
January 27th, 2009
As Bank of America's board meets next week, shareholders have turned up the pressure on CEO Kenneth D. Lewis. Their scrutiny has also turned an unusual spotlight on the oversight role played by the bank's board members.

US: Rubin Leaving Citigroup; Smith Barney for Sale
by Eric Dash and Louise StoryNew York Times
January 9th, 2009
Robert Rubin will resign from the beleaguered Citigroup. As Treasury secretary during the Clinton administration, Mr. Rubin helped loosen Depression-era banking regulations that made Citigroup's creation possible. He also helped beat back tighter oversight of exotic financial products during that time.

US: On Wall Street, Bonuses, Not Profits, Were Real
by LOUISE STORYThe New York Times
December 17th, 2008
As regulators and shareholders sift through the rubble of the financial crisis, questions are being asked about what role lavish bonuses played in the debacle. Scrutiny over pay is intensifying as banks like Merrill prepare to dole out bonuses even after they have had to be propped up with billions of dollars of taxpayers’ money.

US: In Factory Sit-In, an Anger Spread Wide
by MONICA DAVEYNew York Times
December 7th, 2008
In a glimpse at how the nation’s loss of more than 600,000 manufacturing jobs this year is boiling over, workers laid off from Republic Windows and Doors, said they would not leave, after company officials announced that the factory was closing. The workers were owed vacation and severance pay and were not given the 60 days of notice generally required by federal law in lay-offs.

US: No Bonuses for 7 Senior Executives at Goldman
by BEN WHITEThe New York Times
November 16th, 2008
As public scrutiny of Wall Street pay intensifies, one bank has already decided what it will award in bonuses to its top seven executives this year: nothing.

US: U.S. May Take Ownership Stake in Banks
by Edmund L. Andrews and Mark LandlerNew York Times
October 8th, 2008
In fresh efforts to stem persisting turmoil in the credit markets, the US Treasury Department is considering partial nationalization of numerous U.S. banks. Insurance giant A.I.G. will also receive a further injection of $37.8 billion.

US: Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac Takeovers Cost U.S. Banks Billions
by John HechingerWall Street Journal
September 23rd, 2008
About a quarter of the nation's banks lost a combined $10 to $15 billion in the wake of the federal government's takeover of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. The losses are galling to small bankers because they took pains to avoid the exotic loans and loose underwriting standards that have hobbled Wall Street titans and some huge banks.

US: Companies Cut Holes in CEOs' Golden Parachutes
by PHRED DVORAKWall Street Journal
September 15th, 2008
Top executives at Double Eagle Petroleum Co. signed employment agreements this month that curtailed a time-honored executive perquisite: the executives don't get severance in cases of "poor performance."

US: Regulator Plans to Bar Big Severance
by JAMES R. HAGERTYWall Street Journal
September 15th, 2008
The regulator of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac said Sunday that it won't allow the companies to make "golden parachute" severance payments to the mortgage companies' ousted chief executive officers.

US: UnitedHealth Ex-CEO Settles Pay Case
by VANESSA FUHRMANS Wall Street Journal
September 11th, 2008
Former UnitedHealth Group Inc. Chief Executive William McGuire agreed to pay $30 million and forfeit 3.7 million stock options to settle shareholder claims related to options backdating, adding to what was already one of the largest executive-pay givebacks in history.

US: Companies Tap Pension Plans To Fund Executive Benefits
by ELLEN E. SCHULTZ and THEO FRANCISThe Wall Street Journal
August 4th, 2008
In recent years, companies from Intel Corp. to CenturyTel Inc. collectively have moved hundreds of millions of dollars of obligations for executive benefits into rank-and-file pension plans. This lets companies capture tax breaks intended for pensions of regular workers and use them to pay for executives' supplemental benefits and compensation.

US: Fannie Mae Ex-Officials Settle
by JAMES R. HAGERTYWall Street Journal
April 19th, 2008
The settlement, announced Friday, brings the government far less than it had originally sought over alleged violations of accounting rules. Fannie's regulator, the Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight, in 2006 sought to require the three former executives to pay back more than $115 million of bonuses and pay fines that it said at the time could total more than $100 million.

GERMANY: Germans sour on capitalism amid corporate scandals
by Jeffrey WhiteChristian Science Monitor
March 25th, 2008
Recent scandals, involving such titans as Siemens, Volkswagen and Deutsche Poste, have undermined public trust in the integrity of German corporations, bolstering a growing shift to the left and its social welfare ideals.

US: Chiefs’ Pay Under Fire at Capitol
by JENNY ANDERSONThe New York Times
March 8th, 2008
In pointed exchanges with Congressional lawmakers Friday, three prominent financial executives defended the multimillion-dollar pay packages they received even as their companies were brought to their knees by the spreading credit crisis.

FRANCE: Sarkozy calls on head of Sociéte Générale to resign over trading scandal
by Katrin BennholdInternational Herald Tribune
February 26th, 2008
President Nicolas Sarkozy of France called on the head of Sociéte Générale to resign over a €4.9 billion trading fraud, saying, "That someone earns €7 million doesn't shock me. On one condition: that he takes responsibility."

US: Former Chief Will Forfeit $418 Million
by Eric DashNew York Times
December 7th, 2007
The former chief executive of UnitedHealth Group agrees to settle claims related to back-dated stock options.

US: We are overpaid say executives
by Francesco GuerreraFinancial Times
October 15th, 2007
Most US corporate leaders believe chief executives are overpaid, according to a study.

UK: From $1 firm, Lord Ashcroft nets £132m
by Simon BowersGuardian (UK)
October 9th, 2007
The UK's Lord Ashcroft, the Conservative party deputy chairman and major donor, has agreed to sell his loss-making US janitorial business in a deal that will bring him a £132m windfall.

US: CEO pay disparity rears its head
by  Francesco Guerrera and Daniel PimlottFinancial Times
October 8th, 2007
The question of "internal pay equity" continues to climb the corporate governance agenda.

CANADA: Four Former Nortel Executives Charged With Accounting Fraud
Associated Press
September 13th, 2007
The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has charged four more former Nortel Networks Corp. executives with accounting fraud, alleging they manipulated reserves to change Nortel's earnings statements on the orders of more senior officers of the Canadian networking equipment maker.

US: NASA gives Google founders a coveted parking place for their private jet
by Miguel HelftInternational Herald Tribune
September 12th, 2007
In the annals of perks enjoyed by American corporate executives, the founders of Google may have set a new standard: an un-crowded, federally-managed runway for their private jet that is as close as can be to being in the company's own backyard.

US: SEC Asks Firms to Detail Top Executives' Pay
by Kara Scannell and Joann S. LubliThe Wall Street Journal
August 31st, 2007
Stepping up its campaign to shed light on the mysteries of executive pay, the Securities and Exchange Commission has sent letters to nearly 300 companies across America critiquing disclosures in this year's proxy statements and demanding more information.

UK: Tesco investors attack executive bonus plan
by Karen AttwoodThe Independent
June 30th, 2007
Anger is mounting over a new bonus scheme at Tesco that will reward chief executive Sir Terry Leahy with a £11.5m windfall if the supermarket group's US venture Fresh & Easy succeeds.

US: Executive Pay: A Special Report. More Pieces. Still a Puzzle.
by Eric DashNew York Times
April 8th, 2007
In response to a barrage of criticism that regulators have not kept up with the complexities of swelling pay packages, the Securities and Exchange Commission now requires corporate America to disclose details of executive compensation more fully. As this year’s proxies pour in, they are packed with fresh information aimed at making pay more transparent. Of course, it also is a lot more confusing.

GERMANY: Siemens chief says corruption scandal won't delay next strategic plan
by Mark Landler and Carter DoughertyHerald Trribune
February 27th, 2007
Even as Siemens has reported buoyant financial results — thanks in part to Kleinfeld's overhaul of its operations — it has been hit with a fast-expanding corruption scandal that threatens to sink its reputation.

US: Lockheed Stock and Two Smoking Barrels
by Richard CummingsPlayboy.com
January 16th, 2007
If you think the Iraq war hasn't worked out very well for anyone, think again. Defense contractors such as Lockheed are thriving. And no wonder: Here's the story how Lockheed's interests- as opposed to those of the American citizenry- set the course of U.S. policy after 9/11.

US: Pentagon Spends Billions to Outsource Torture
by Joshua HollandAlternet
September 14th, 2006
The thousands of mercenary security contractors employed in the Bush administration's "War on Terror" are billed to American taxpayers, but they've handed Osama Bin Laden his greatest victories -- public relations coups that have transformed him from just another face in a crowd of radical clerics to a hero of millions in the global South (posters of Bin Laden have been spotted in largely Catholic Latin America during protests against George W. Bush).

US: Who Signed Off on Those Options?
by Eric DashThe New York Times
August 27th, 2006
As Silicon Valley companies competed for top talent during the heady days of the dot-com boom — luring stars with plump signing bonuses and the most highly prized manna of all, stock options — Mercury Interactive, a highflying software concern, joined the fray with gusto.

US: Belated Apologies in Proxy Land
by Gretchen MorgensonThe New York Times
August 20th, 2006
Let us now praise a mutual fund company that actually voted in its customers’ interests when casting annual proxy votes this spring. And let us now rebuke the corporate executives who didn’t bother responding to letters from the fund company’s chairman detailing its views.

US: Creditors: Dana execs' bonus plan could spur pension cuts
by Joseph RebelloAssociated Press
August 14th, 2006
Dana Corp. creditors said the company's latest plan to reward six top executives would allow them to reap a "windfall" if they were to get Dana to cut workers' retirement benefits.

US: Options Brought Riches and Now Big Trouble
by Floyd NorrisThe New York Times
July 25th, 2006
It was stock options that made Gregory L. Reyes, the former chief executive of Brocade Communications Systems, very rich, and now it is abuse of options that may send him to prison.

US: Study Finds Backdating of Options Widespread
by Stephanie SaulThe New York Times
July 17th, 2006
More than 2,000 companies appear to have used backdated stock options to sweeten their top executives’ pay packages, according to a new study that suggests the practice is far more widespread than previously disclosed.

US: Many Executives' Paychecks Swelled
by Terence O'HaraThe Washington Post
July 10th, 2006
An analysis of 282 local executives at 109 area companies who have had the same title from 2003 until the end of 2005 showed that merely sticking around gives an executive an excellent chance of getting a raise, sometimes a big one. In many cases, raises are dictated by employment contracts or other compensation practices that have nothing to do with an executive's job performance and are often divorced from the kind of market logic that dictates how most people are paid.

FRANCE: France's shareholder revolt
by Henri AstierBBC
June 29th, 2006

US: Apollo Group Receives Subpoena for Stock Options Records
Bloomberg News
June 20th, 2006
Apollo Group Inc., a for-profit education company whose schools include the University of Phoenix, said yesterday that it had received a subpoena from the United States attorney's office for the Southern District of New York, related to stock option grants.

UK: Scottish Power Pays Former Executives 'Obscene' £11m
by Ashley SeagerThe Guardian (UK)
June 19th, 2006
Four executives of energy company Scottish Power cost the company £11m in severance pay when they left their jobs over the past year, the group's annual report revealed yesterday. The payouts were immediately condemned as "obscene" by the Scottish National party's energy spokesman, Richard Lochhead.

US: Earning power
by Laura SmithermanBaltimore Sun
June 18th, 2006
Although "pay for performance" has become the catchphrase in boardrooms, executive compensation continues to swell at companies thriving and not, large and small, through practices that have drawn scorn from investor groups and labor unions.

EU: U.S.-Style Pay Packages Are All the Rage in Europe
by Geraldine FabrikantThe New York Times
June 16th, 2006
Along with hip-hop and Hollywood movies, Europeans are eagerly importing another American phenomenon: soaring pay packages for chief executives.

US: Big Bonuses Still Flow, Even if Bosses Miss Goals
by Gretchen MorgensonThe New York Times
May 31st, 2006
As executive pay packages have rocketed in recent years, their defenders have contended that because most are tied to company performance, they are both earned and deserved. But as the Las Vegas Sands example shows, investors who plow through company filings often find that executive compensation exceeds the amounts allowed under the performance targets set by the directors.

US: With Links to Board, Home Depot Chief Saw His Pay Soar
by Julie CreswellThe New York Times
May 24th, 2006

US: Uh-oh, it's the shareholders
by Bruce MeyersonChicago Sun-Times
May 21st, 2006
It happens only once a year, and yet so many headstrong corporate CEO's can't seem to cope with being in a room with shareholders for a few hours at the annual meeting.

US: Executives Take Company Planes as if Their Own
by Geraldine FabrikantThe New York Times
May 10th, 2006
Richard D. Parsons, chairman and chief executive of Time Warner, owns a small vineyard in Tuscany that produces a Brunello di Montalcino selling for $80 a bottle, adorned with a crest of the Parsons family.

US: Chief's Pay Is Docked by Raytheon
by Leslie WayneThe New York Times
May 3rd, 2006
Raytheon directors punished the chief executive, William H. Swanson, by taking away almost $1 million from his 2006 compensation yesterday because he failed to give credit for material that was in a management book he wrote.

US: Exxon Chairman Got Retirement Package Worth at Least $398 Million
by Jad MouawadThe New York Times
April 13th, 2006
Last year's high oil prices not only helped Exxon Mobil report $36 billion in profit � the most ever for any corporation � they also allowed Lee R. Raymond to retire in style as chairman of Exxon Mobil.

US: EXECUTIVE PAY; C.E.O. Pay Keeps Rising, And Bigger Rises Faster
by Eric DashThe New York Times
April 9th, 2006
CHIEF executives' pay continued to rise in 2005, although at a slightly slower pace than in 2004.

US: AFL-CIO puts big CEO pensions under scope
by Edward IwataUSA Today
April 7th, 2006
Amid growing concern over a wave of cutbacks in corporate pension plans for employees, the CEOs of top U.S. companies would receive "golden pensions" that range from $2 million to $6.5 million a year, according to a study by the AFL-CIO union federation.

US: SEC Moves to Require More Disclosure on Executive Pay
Associated Press
January 17th, 2006
Federal securities regulators moved Tuesday to require companies to provide far greater detail about their executives' pay packages and perks in an effort to bring more transparency to an area that has provoked investor and public anger.

US: Disney Paid Eisner $10.1 Million in '05
Associated Press
January 12th, 2006
Michael D. Eisner, former chief executive of the Walt Disney Company, received $10.1 million in compensation last year, including a $9.1 million cash bonus, according to the company's annual proxy statement filed Wednesday.

US: Wall $t. bonuses balloon to new record
CNN
January 11th, 2006
Wall Street bonuses set a new record of $21.5 billion in 2005, surpassing the previous record of $19.5 billion set in 2000 during the peak of the last bull market, according to a report released Wednesday by New York State Comptroller Alan G. Hevesi.

US: SEC to Propose Overhaul of Rules On Executive Pay
by Kara ScannellWashington Post
January 10th, 2006
The Securities and Exchange Commission, responding to rising criticism of soaring -- and partially hidden -- executive pay, is poised to propose the most sweeping overhaul of pay disclosure rules in 14 years, seeking to push companies to divulge much more about their top executives' perquisites, retirement benefits and total compensation.

US: Call It the Deal of a Lifetime
by Landon Thomas, Jr.The New York Times
January 8th, 2006
It has been a wrenching professional and personal reversal for Michael Kopper, who three years ago became the first Enron executive to plead guilty to criminal charges and cut a deal with the government. Mr. Kopper was also the first high-ranking Enron employee to publicly admit to lying and stealing - in his case, more than $16 million - from the company.

US: No, let me pay: Execs get tax help
CNN
December 22nd, 2005
More than half the nation's largest companies are giving their top executives extra money to pay taxes due on corporate perks such as luxury cars and even on capital gains, according to a published report.

US: A Record Year for Shareholder Activism
by G. Jeffrey MacDonaldChristian Science Monitor
June 28th, 2004
Question: What single force can get Tyco International to strive for cleaner emissions, inspire PepsiCo to study the impact of AIDS in developing nations, and even get Merck & Co. to declare its intentions to not manufacture an abortion pill? Answer: shareholders.