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US: Telecom Swap Meet
by Cynthia L. WebbWashingtonPost.com
September 25th, 2002
Surprise, surprise. Some big telecoms, just like a variety of other New Economy firms, engaged in questionable accounting practices to inflate revenues. In the case of several brand-name telecoms, the companies swapped bandwidth capacity with each other and then booked the deals as revenue. Revelations of just how far many companies took this scheme -- including allegations of verbal agreements made in tandem with written contracts -- were highlighted at a congressional hearing yesterday.

AUSTRALIA: Police Seek to Shut Down WTO Protest Sites
Sydney Morning Herald
September 25th, 2002
New South Wales (NSW) Police Minister Michael Costa has asked the Federal Government to shut down websites with instructions to disrupt a World Trade Organisation (WTO) meeting in Sydney.

JAPAN: Panel Adopts Outline for Intellectual Property Legislation
The Japan Times
September 20th, 2002
A government panel adopted on Thursday an outline for proposed legislation aimed at promoting and protecting intellectual property rights, such as patents and copyrights. The proposed law is designed to encourage the transfer of intellectual property from academic institutions to corporations, according to the Strategic Council on Intellectual Property.

US: Enron's Giant Bandwith Scam
by Stephen PizzoDaily Enron
September 13th, 2002
At some point it dawned on the wheeler-dealers at Enron that selling real things - like gas and oil - had it limits. What they needed were products that had no physical limits. Energy contract futures were their first discovery, and how sweet they were. No more messy oil or smelly gas to deliver - just electronic bookkeeping notations. That's when Jeffrey Skilling discovered a product so ephemeral it bordered on metaphysical - bandwidth.

US: Recasting the Web, Info Commons to Cash Cow
by Karen CharmanExtra!
August 26th, 2002
If the Bush administration lets large media conglomerates and local telephone companies have their way, the Internet as we know it -- that free-flowing, democratic, uncensored information superhighway -- could soon be a thing of the past.

US: Store Customer Cards a Source for FBI?
by Kelley Beaucar VlahosFoxNews.com
August 1st, 2002
WASHINGTON -- So you have a secret craving for Little Debbie peanut butter bars and a penchant for Kendall-Jackson merlot? While that customer loyalty card at the supermarket might perceivably save you a few pennies at the checkout counter, your buying habits could end up in the hands of government agents.

US: ACLU Pushes for Open Access
by Troy WolvertonZDNet News
July 30th, 2002
The Internet's status as an open forum for ideas will come under attack if cable companies aren't forced to open up their broadband networks to rivals, civil liberties and consumer advocacy groups said Monday.

PERU: Microsoft's Big Stick
by Agustin d'EmpaireWired.com
July 27th, 2002
BUENOS AIRES -- Afraid that Peru may adopt a bill decreeing the use of open-source software in all government systems, Microsoft apparently enlisted the American ambassador in Lima to help try to convince the Peruvians to kill the legislation.

US: Tech Industry Pushes Homeland Security Legislation
by D. Ian HopperAssociated Press
July 10th, 2002
The companies making new homeland security devices, such as bomb detectors and biological weapon alarms, want the government to pick up the tab if their products fail and they are sued.

EU: HP, Compaq Job Cuts Total 5,900
Reuters
July 3rd, 2002
FRANKFURT -- U.S. computer giant Hewlett-Packard said on Wednesday it plans to cut 5,900 jobs in Europe from a total of 15,000 already announced worldwide, as part of its merger with Compaq Computer Corp.

HUNGARY: Internet Users Take Action Against Telecom Giant
Association for Progressive Communications
May 31st, 2002
Matav, leading telecom company in Hungary, subsidiary of Deutsche Telekom, responsible for the majority of internet connections in the country, at the end of Arpil declared they would withdraw their flat-rate dial-up access package (the ''Mindenkinek'' tariff package and the 150 HUF per session discount) from 1 July 2002, which would mean excluding a large number of Hungarians from using the net. The flat-rate packages, largely instrumental in spreading Internet use countrywide since 1999, were tolerable but not cheap. A rise in the prices would bereave many homes of Internet access, broadband connection being unaffordable for many of those who chose dial-up service.

Taiwan: Workers Link Cancer to RCA Plant
by Matthew YiSan Francisco Chronicle
May 24th, 2002
While many laud the globalization of technology as a positive force that spreads the wealth and helps industry grow, a group of Taiwanese workers came to Silicon Valley Thursday to tell a different story.

SOUTH AFRICA: Biggest ICT Education Project Draws Flak
by Anthony StoppardInter Press Service
May 22nd, 2002
"Mkathimbani'' means cyberspace in the indigenous Nguni languages of Southern Africa.

US: Senators Question AT&T-Comcast Merger
Reuters
April 23rd, 2002
U.S. senators on Tuesday raised concerns about the possible negative impact that Comcast's proposed purchase of AT&T's cable assets could have on diverse programming and Internet access.

US: Ellison, Ashcroft Win 'Big Brother' Awards
Reuters
April 19th, 2002
U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft and database billionaire Larry Ellison were named this year's most notorious American violators of personal privacy by leading advocacy groups on Thursday. The annual ''Big Brother Awards'' are presented to government, corporations and private individuals who allegedly have done the most to threaten personal privacy.

AFRICA: The Great Internet Robbery
BBC
April 15th, 2002
Africa is being ripped off -- to the tune of some $500m a year -- simply for hooking up to the World Wide Web, say Kenyan internet company chiefs. And this extra cost is partly to blame for slowing the spread of the internet in Africa and helping sustain the digital divide, they contend.

US: Seeking Profits, Internet Companies Alter Privacy Policy
by Saul HansellNew York Times
April 11th, 2002
Pressed for profits, Internet companies are increasingly selling access to their users' postal mail addresses and telephone numbers, in addition to flooding their e-mail boxes with junk mail.

US: New Hot Line Links CEOs to White House
by Tiffany KaryCNET News.com
April 3rd, 2002
A high-security communications network linking government leaders to some of technology's biggest names in the event of a national disaster will be unveiled early next month, officials say. Inspired by the breakdown in communication on Sept. 11, when frantic calls overwhelmed phone lines, the so-called CEO Link will be used to shuttle high-priority news between government officials and executives.

AFRICA: Cyberia Takes Foothold
Wired.com
March 13th, 2002
ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast -- It may take all day to phone Ghana from the country next door, but if you want the latest news from a shadowy group of rebels fighting in remote West African jungles, you can always go to their website.

US: Ashcroft Asks Telcom to Help Track Terrorists
by Brian KrebsNewsbytes.com
March 1st, 2002
U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft shopped the Bush administration's anti-terrorism agenda to the nation's regional telecom providers today, urging them to press ahead with reforms that would make it easier for the government to intercept terrorist communications.

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