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News Articles : Displaying 46-65 of 91


US: For Tobacco, Stealth Marketing Is the Norm
by Julie BosmanNew York Times
March 10th, 2006
Tobacco companies, which are able to vastly outspend antitobacco groups, may still be winning the marketing wars. While tobacco companies have abandoned most conventional advertising, they are using other means to get their point across. Antismoking groups, on the other hand, are now struggling to find the money to maintain even a small-scale campaign.

US: Chromium Evidence Buried, Report Says
by Rick WeissThe Washington Post
February 24th, 2006
Scientists working for the chromium industry withheld data about the metal's health risks while the industry campaigned to block strict new limits on the cancer-causing chemical, according to a scientific journal report published yesterday.

US: Wal-Mart to Loosen Health Insurance Limits
by Michael BarbaroThe New York Times
February 23rd, 2006
Wal-Mart Stores, facing a raft of state legislation that would require it to increase spending on employee health insurance, will lift several of its long-standing — and most-criticized — restrictions on eligibility over the next year, the giant retailer said this morning.

AUSTRALIA: Lobbyists hired by AWB
by Richard BakerSydney Morning Herald
February 22nd, 2006
AWB enlisted the help of an influential Washington lobby firm headed by the former US defence secretary, William Cohen, to deal with a United Nations investigation into kickbacks paid to Saddam Hussein.

US: Advisories on Fish and the Pitfalls of Good Intent
by Marian BurrosThe New York Times
February 15th, 2006
SHOPPING for fish these days is fraught with confusion. There is so much contradictory information about what is safe and what isn't. Some nutritionists are worried that people will throw up their hands and choose steak instead.

US: Quick Rise for Purveyors of Propaganda in Iraq
by David S. CloudThe New York Times
February 15th, 2006
Mr. Bailey, a boyish-looking Briton, and Mr. Craig, a chain-smoking former Marine sergeant, then began winning multimillion-dollar contracts with the United States military to produce propaganda in Iraq.

US: Sales Brisk for "Wal-Mart" Docu As Accusations Fly
Reuters
February 15th, 2006
Berlin's European Film Market became the backdrop for yet another verbal battle between Wal-Mart and its filmmaker nemesis Robert Greenwald on Tuesday. The Greenwald-directed film "Wal-Mart: The High Cost of Low Price" made for hot sales but heated words at the market.

UK: Drug firm censured for lapdancing junket
by Sarah BoseleyThe Guardian
February 14th, 2006
One of the world's largest drug companies has been disciplined by the industry's UK watchdog after admitting that its staff entertained doctors to greyhound racing, lapdancing and Centre Court tickets at Wimbledon.

US: Record Sales of Sleeping Pills Are Causing Worries
by Stephanie SaulThe New York Times
February 7th, 2006
Americans are taking sleeping pills like never before, fueled by frenetic workdays that do not go gently into a great night's sleep, and lulled by a surge of consumer advertising that promises safe slumber with minimal side effects.

IRAQ: Planted Articles May Be Violation
by Mark MazzettiLos Angeles Times
January 27th, 2006

SWITZERLAND: "Corporate villains" named and shamed
Swiss Info
January 25th, 2006
The Walt Disney Company, the Chevron Corporation and Citigroup have been awarded booby prizes by Swiss non-governmental organisations (NGOs).

GHANA: Ghana Journalists Condemn Gold Mining Campaign Aimed at Children
Environment News Service
January 23rd, 2006
The Ghana Institute of Journalism is objecting to a new public relations collaboration between the mining company Newmont Ghana Gold Ltd. and the weekly newspaper "Junior Graphic" to make positive information about gold mining available to children in Ghana.

US: Consumer Group to Sue Cereal Maker
ABC News
January 18th, 2006
A consumer group wants to keep Tony the Tiger from promoting sugary cereals on the SpongeBob SquarePants cartoon show, or anywhere else kids are watching.

US: AmeriDebt Founder Settles Charges
by Caroline E. MayerWashington Post
January 10th, 2006
The founder of the defunct credit-counseling firm AmeriDebt Inc. yesterday agreed to pay up to $35 million to settle two lawsuits accusing him of misleading debt-burdened consumers into paying high fees to support his lavish lifestyle.

US: AmeriDebt Founder to Settle With the FTC
by Steven ManningAssociated Press
January 9th, 2006
The founder of the credit counseling firm AmeriDebt on Monday agreed to pay $35 million to settle suits filed by regulators and former customers over $172 million in allegedly hidden fees the company collected from financially strapped debtors.

AFRICA: Death By Dilution
by Robert CockburnAmerican Prospect
December 20th, 2005
When fakes of a GlaxoSmithKline anti-malarial drug turned up in Africa, authorities assumed the drug giant would want to know. Instead, they learned about a huge, evil trade in fake drugs -- and about an industry that doesn’t want the truth to get out.

NEPAL: Nepal's Garment Industry Hangs by a Thread
by Jo JohnsonFinancial Times
December 19th, 2005
The pashmina bubble that buoyed the garment industry in the late 1990s has burst. Fashion trendsetters have moved on, leaving a glut of cheap Chinese knock-offs in their wake.

US: DirecTV, Marketers Settle Charges Do-Not-Call Rules Violated, FTC Says
by Jonathan KrimWashington Post
December 14th, 2005
Satellite television operator DirecTV Group Inc. agreed to pay $5.3 million to settle charges it repeatedly violated rules against telemarketing to consumers whose names were on a national do-not-call registry, the Federal Trade Commission announced yesterday.

US: Best Buy Sued for Bias
by Jason JohnsonSan Francisco Chronicle
December 10th, 2005
Six current and former employees of Best Buy filed a race- and sex-discrimination lawsuit Thursday against the consumer electronics chain in federal court in San Francisco, accusing it of denying better-paying sales and managerial jobs to African Americans, Latinos and women in favor of white men.

U.S.: A New Weapon for Wal-Mart: A War Room
by Michael BarbaroThe New York Times
November 1st, 2005
Wal-Mart is taking a page from the modern political playbook. Under fire from well-organized opponents who have hammered the retailer with criticisms of its wages, health insurance and treatment of workers, Wal-Mart has quietly recruited former presidential advisers, including Michael K. Deaver, who was Ronald Reagan's image-meister, and Leslie Dach, one of Bill Clinton's media consultants, to set up a rapid-response public relations team in Arkansas.