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News Articles : Displaying 66-85 of 344


US: UAW Workers Walk Off the Job
by John D. Stoll and Jeffrey McCrackenWall Street Journal
September 24th, 2007
The decision Monday by the United Auto Workers to walk off the job at General Motors highlights yet again the divisive element of healthcare in labor relations, and how what began as a historic accident is now the single biggest liability for both businesses and workers.

CHINA: The Misery of China's Mines As Anger Flares Over Latest Disaster,Workers and Families Feel Powerless
by Edward CodyWashington Post
August 22nd, 2007
Anger at the wide spread pain and suffering of mining communities flares with each new disaster and the recent collapse of a mine on the Chaiwen River is no exception.

CHINA: U.S. Group Accuses Chinese Toy Factories of Labor Abuses
by David Barboza New York Times
August 21st, 2007
A workers’ rights group in the United States released a report on Tuesday detailing what it called brutal conditions and illegal practices in Chinese toy factories, many of which supply some of the world’s biggest brand-name toy makers, including Walt Disney and Hasbro.

INDIA: Indians Protest Wal-Mart’s Wholesale Entry
by Amelia GentlemanThe New York Times
August 9th, 2007
Wal-Mart, in a struggle to expand its global reach, is trying to enter India through the back door, but many consumers here have taken notice.

WORLD: We must count the true cost of cheap China
by Richard McGregorFinancial Times
August 2nd, 2007
In the wake of the multiple scandals over tainted Chinese food and drug exports in recent months, Chinese goods now have an indelible image of being not just cheap, but life-threatening as well. But the fact that wrongly labelled foods, liquor and pharmaceuticals have routinely sickened and even killed people en masse in China has been largely overlooked.

COLOMBIA: Suing Multinationals Over Murder
by Ken StierTIME Magazine
August 1st, 2007
Organized labor often complains of its treatment at the hands of corporate America, but its accusations pale in comparison to those made recently by the widows of Colombian mine workers in an Alabama courtroom. During a two-week trial, a Birmingham jury weighed charges that the local Drummond Coal Company bore responsibility for the murders of three union leaders who represented workers at its Colombian mine - the world's largest open pit mine.

MEXICO: Thousands of Unpaid Teens Bag Groceries for Wal-Mart
by Joseph ContrerasNewsweek
August 1st, 2007
Wal-Mart prides itself on cutting costs at home and abroad, and its Mexican operations are no exception. Wal-Mart is Mexico's largest private-sector employer in the nation today, with nearly 150,000 local residents on its payroll. An additional 19,000 youngsters between the ages of 14 and 16 work after school in hundreds of Wal-Mart stores, mostly as grocery baggers, throughout Mexico-and none of them receives a red cent in wages or fringe benefits.

CHINA: Beijing Games Officials Penalize Firms
by Mei FongThe Wall Street Journal
August 1st, 2007
The Beijing Olympic Organizing Committee said it was taking corrective measures after a monthlong investigation found that four factories making Olympic merchandise were guilty of labor violations.

US: A Storied Union Takes On Starbucks
by Moira HerbstBusiness Week
August 1st, 2007
The Industrial Workers of the World is taking on the coffee giant and its much-praised workplace practices

BRITAIN: Brown unveils global anti-poverty drive
by Jean EagleshamFinancial Times
August 1st, 2007
Gordon Brown yesterday unveiled a "moral" alliance of leaders of governments and multinationals to tackle global poverty, telling the United Nations that globalisation could be a force for justice.

IRAQ: Foreign Workers Abused at Embassy, Panel Told
by William BraniginThe Washinton Post
July 27th, 2007
Two American civilian contractors who worked on a massive U.S. Embassy construction project in Baghdad told Congress yesterday that foreign laborers were deceptively recruited and trafficked to Iraq to toil at the site, where they experienced physical abuse and substandard working conditions.

SOUTH AFRICA: S African miners vote to strike
BBC News
July 26th, 2007
South African workers for the world's biggest diamond producer, De Beers, have voted to go on strike over pay.

COLOMBIA: Drummond Union: Govt Muffles Key Witness
by Frank BajakForbes.com
July 24th, 2007
The union activists suing U.S. coal company Drummond Co. Inc. in Alabama in the 2001 murders of three labor leaders say deliberate foot-dragging by Colombian authorities is preventing the jury from hearing their star witness. Concerned by the delay, 12 Democrats in the U.S. Congress wrote Colombia's vice president last week asking him to intercede.

US: Tax Break Used by Drug Makers Failed to Add Jobs
by Alex BerensonThe New York Times
July 24th, 2007
Two years ago, when companies received a big tax break to bring home their offshore profits, the president and Congress justified it as a one-time tax amnesty that would create American jobs. Drug makers were the biggest beneficiaries of the amnesty program, repatriating about $100 billion in foreign profits and paying only minimal taxes. But the companies did not create many jobs in return. Instead, since 2005 the American drug industry has laid off tens of thousands of workers in thi

NIGERIA: Tycoon exits Nigerian oil deals
BBC News
July 19th, 2007
Nigerian consortium Bluestar, led by tycoon Aliko Dangote, has pulled out of a deal to take stakes in oil refineries after protests by trade unionists.

UK: MPs want UK to pay living wage to overseas staff
by Karen McVeighThe Guardian (UK)
July 17th, 2007
MPs called for legislation yesterday to make British retailers pay their garment workers overseas a living wage.

UN: Global Compact with Business 'Lacks Teeth' - NGOs
by Gustavo CapdevilaInter Press News Service (IPS)
July 6th, 2007
The U.N.'s Global Compact with international big business "at the moment is so voluntary that it really is a happy-go-lucky club," says Ramesh Singh, chief executive of ActionAid, a non-governmental organisation. The controversy has come to a boiling point because of the Global Compact Leaders' Summit being held in Geneva on Thursday and Friday, at which over 1,000 representatives of multinational companies are taking part, in addition to well-known civil society figures like Irene Khan, the secretary general of AI; Mary Robinson, president of the Ethical Globalisation Initiative; Guy Ryder, general secretary of the International Trade Union Confederation; and Jeremy Hobbs, executive director of Oxfam International.

US: States Target Big-Box Stores; Maine Is First to Require That Wal-Mart, Rivals Undergo Impact Studies
by Kris HudsonThe Wall Street Journal
June 29th, 2007
Maine Gov. John Baldacci last week signed into law a measure requiring developers of retail stores exceeding 75,000 square feet to conduct studies gauging the project's impact on municipal services, the environment and local businesses. Similar measures have been passed in other states.

CHINA: The Growing Dangers of China Trade
by Jyoti ThottamTIME Magazine
June 28th, 2007
Growing concerns over the safety of everyday goods manufactured in China and imported to the US have thrown into relief the problematic (and dangerous) differences in safety and regulatory standards between the two countries.

SOUTH AFRICA: Globalization Brings South Africa Gains -- and Pains
by David WesselThe Wall Street Journal
June 21st, 2007
Globalization has been both a boon and a bane for South Africa; it has helped along the country's integration into the global economy and strengthened its regional political position, but it has also contributed to the widening gap between a wealthy minority and the poor majority, something that is creating a whole new generation of disenfranchised citizens.

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