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ARCTIC: Shell Launches Preemptive Legal Strike For Ocean Drilling
by Kim MurphyLos Angeles Times
February 29th, 2012
Royal Dutch Shell launched an extraordinary preemptive legal strike Wednesday against opponents of offshore oil drilling in the Arctic Ocean, filing suit against more than a dozen environmental organizations likely to challenge its plan for drilling exploratory wells in the Chukchi Sea this summer.

U.S.: TransCanada Pipeline Foes See U.S. Bias in E-Mails
by Elisabeth RosenthalNew York Times
October 3rd, 2011
E-mails obtained by Friends of the Earth paint a picture of a collaborative relationship between lobbyists for TransCanada and the U.S. State department, the agency that has final say over a 1,661 mile pipeline that will transport tar sands crude from Alberta to Texas. Embassy officials in Ottawa procured invitations to Fourth of July parties for TransCanada officials and shared information with the company about Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton’s meetings.

LIBERIA: Hunting for Liberia’s Missing Millions
by Doreen CarvjalNew York Times
May 30th, 2010
How much money did Charles G. Taylor, the deposed president of Liberia, siphon out of his war-shattered country, and where is it? Investigators are developing a new strategy involving filing civil damage claims against companies, governments and international banks that they contend aided Mr. Taylor in illegal transactions.

NIGERIA: Nigeria's agony dwarfs the Gulf oil spill. The US and Europe ignore it
by John VidalThe Guardian (UK)
May 30th, 2010
With 606 oilfields, the Niger delta supplies 40% of all the crude the United States imports and is the world capital of oil pollution. More oil is spilled from the delta's network of terminals, pipes, pumping stations and oil platforms every year than has been lost in the current BP/Transocean oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

US: Nature Conservancy faces potential backlash from ties with BP
by Joe StephensWashington Post
May 24th, 2010
The Nature Conservancy faces a problem: a potential backlash as its supporters learn that BP and the world's largest environmental organization long ago forged a relationship that has lent BP an Earth-friendly image and helped fund the Conservancy. The crude emanating from BP's well threatens to befoul a number of alliances between energy conglomerates and environmental nonprofits.

US: Oil Hits Home, Spreading Arc of Frustration
by Campbell Robertson, Clifford Krauss and John M. BroderNew York Times
May 24th, 2010
More than a month has passed since the Deepwater Horizon rig blew up, spewing oil into the Gulf of Mexico and frustrating all efforts to contain it. The disaster underscores the enduring laxity of federal regulation of offshore operations and has shown the government to be almost wholly at the mercy of BP and of Transocean, the company leasing the rig.

WORLD: Disaster Plans Lacking at Deep Rigs
by Ben Casselman and Guy ChazenWall Street Journal
May 17th, 2010
Dealing with a deep-sea spill is a a problem that spans the industry, whose major players include Chevron Corp, Royal Dutch Shell and Petróleo Brasileiro SA. Without adequately planning for trouble, the oil business has focused on developing experimental equipment and techniques to drill in ever deeper waters, according to a Wall Street Journal examination.

US: U.S. Said to Allow Drilling Without Needed Permits
by Ian UrbinaNew York Times
May 13th, 2010
The federal Minerals Management Service gave permission to BP and dozens of other oil companies to drill in the Gulf of Mexico without first getting required permits from another agency that assesses threats to endangered species — and despite strong warnings from that agency about the impact the drilling was likely to have on the gulf.

UK/CANADA: Tar sands crude is reaching British petrol stations, Greenpeace says
by Terry MacalisterThe Guardian (UK)
May 9th, 2010
While City investors have begun to question the role of companies such as BP and Shell in the tar sands business, a new report by Greenpeace claims British motorists are unwitting users of diesel and petrol derived from the tar sands of Alberta, Canada. The carbon-heavy production methods involved make tar sands extraction particularly damaging to the environment.

US: BP touts itself as 'green,' but faces PR disaster with 'BP oil spill'
by Paul FarhiWashington Post
May 6th, 2010
Ever careful of its public image, BP has been careful not to invoke its name in regard to the massive ongoing oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. "We refer to it as Gulf of Mexico response," said Andrew Gowers, the company's spokesman. The name of a disaster can be critical, both as a historic matter and the more immediate matters of image, public relations and legal liability.

US: FBI Probes Explosion in West Virginia Mine
by Kris Maher and Siobhan HughesWall Street Journal
April 30th, 2010
The Federal Bureau of Investigation is conducting a criminal probe of the deadly explosion at a Massey Energy Co. mine in West Virginia in early April that killed 29 miners, according to people familiar with the matter. In a statement on Friday Massey Energy said, "Massey has no knowledge of criminal wrongdoing."

US: BP Is Criticized Over Oil Spill, but U.S. Missed Chances to Act
by Campbell Robertson and Eric LiptonNew York Times
April 30th, 2010
The Obama administration began Friday to publicly chastise BP America for its handling of the spreading oil gusher in the Gulf of Mexico. Officials initially seemed to underestimate the threat of a leak, just as BP did last year when it told the government such an event was highly unlikely.

US: Oil Spill’s Blow to BP’s Image May Eclipse Costs
by Clifford Krauss New York Times
April 29th, 2010
BP says that the offshore drilling accident that is spewing thousands of barrels of oil a day into the Gulf of Mexico could cost the company several hundred million dollars. Nobody really knows whether the oil giant is being too conservative about the cost for the April 20 accident, which some experts say could end up as the biggest oil spill in history.

BURMA: Pressure Mounts on Energy Giant Chevron to Disclose Revenue
by Marwaan Macan-Markar Inter Press Service (IPS)
April 29th, 2010
When shareholders of the multinational company Chevron gather for their annual meeting in the U.S. city of Houston in late May, they will come face to face with Naing Htoo, whose community has suffered due to the exploits of the energy giant in military-ruled Burma.

CANADA: Munk takes on mine protesters, defends capitalism
by John SpearsThe Star
April 28th, 2010
Mark Ekepa journeyed from Papua New Guinea to tell the shareholders of Barrick Gold Corp. how police had burned down his house near the Barrick’s Porgera mine. Idolia Bornones travelled from Chile to say that Barrick operations are damaging local glaciers and rivers. But Barrick chairman Peter Munk was unrepentant as he faced the company’s annual meeting.

US: Deaths at West Virginia Mine Raise Issues About Safety
by Ian Urbina and Michael CooperNew York Times
April 6th, 2010
Rescue workers began the precarious task Tuesday of removing explosive methane gas from the coal mine where at least 25 miners died the day before. The mine owner’s -- Massey Energy Company -- dismal safety record, along with several recent evacuations of the mine, left federal officials and miners suggesting that Monday’s explosion might have been preventable.

CANADA/CHINA: Canada looks to China to exploit oil sands rejected by US
by Suzanne GoldenbergThe Guardian (UK)
February 14th, 2010
Canada, faced with growing political pressure over the extraction of oil from its highly polluting tar sands, has begun courting China and other Asian countries to exploit the resource. The move comes as US firms are turning away from tar sands because of its heavy carbon footprint and damage to the landscape.

NIGERIA: Ex-militant leader heads SPDC’s patrol team
by Chris EjimNigerian Compass
January 8th, 2010
Authorities of Shell Petroleum Development Company (SPDC) have unveiled a new security strategy for securing oil pipelines and platforms within the Niger Delta region. Shell has appointed former MEND militant commander, Eris Paul, and his company, Eristex Pipeline Patrol, to secure oil facilities in the Southern Ijaw area of the Delta.

GHANA: Corruption probe into sale of Ghana oil block
by William Wallis, Martin Arnold and Brooke MastersFinancial Times
January 7th, 2010
US and Ghanaian authorities are investigating corruption allegations involving a Texas oil company and the local partner that helped it secure control of the Ghanaian oil block that yielded one of Africa’s biggest recent discoveries. The case risks complicating efforts by Texas company Kosmos to sell its stake in the Jubilee oil field to ExxonMobil in a deal valued at $4bn.

CHINA: Earth-Friendly Elements, Mined Destructively
by Keith BradsherNew York Times
December 26th, 2009
Some of the greenest technologies of the age, from electric cars to efficient light bulbs to very large wind turbines, are made possible by an unusual group of elements called rare earths. Most of these come from China. “In many places, the mining is abused,” said Wang Caifeng, the top rare-earths industry regulator at the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology in China.

US: Monsanto's dominance draws antitrust inquiry
by Peter WhoriskeyWashington Post
November 29th, 2009
For plants designed in a lab a little more than a decade ago, they've come a long way: Today, the vast majority of the nation's two primary crops grow from seeds genetically altered according to Monsanto company patents. Now Monsanto -- like IBM and Google -- has drawn scrutiny from U.S. antitrust investigators.

US/ECUADOR: New nonprofit uses Web to pressure Chevron
by David A. BakerSan Francisco Chronicle
November 16th, 2009
Retired retail executive Richard Goldman was astonished when he heard about the $27 billion pollution lawsuit against Chevron Corp. in Ecuador. SO he has created a nonprofit group, Ethos Alliance, that will use social-networking tools to spread word of the case and put pressure on Chevron.

UK: Friends of the Earth attacks carbon trading
by Ashley SeagerThe Guardian (UK)
November 5th, 2009
The world's carbon trading markets growing complexity threatens another "sub-prime" style financial crisis that could again destabilise the global economy, campaigners warn. In a new report, Friends of the Earth says that to date "cap and trade" carbon markets have done little to reduce emissions but have been plagued by inefficiency and corruption.

SOUTHEAST ASIA: Sizing up palm oil
by David GrantChristian Science Monitor
November 2nd, 2009
While it doesn’t sound (and need not be) nefarious, activist groups worldwide like the Rainforest Action Network argue that the production of palm oil is currently harming rain forests in Southeast Asia, orangutans, and the environment.

BRAZIL: Giants in Cattle Industry Agree to Help Fight Deforestation
by Alexei BarrionuevoNew York Times
October 7th, 2009
Environmental groups hailed a decision this week by four of the world’s largest meat producers to ban the purchase of cattle from newly deforested areas of Brazil’s Amazon rain forest. Brazil has the world’s largest cattle herd and is the world’s largest beef exporter. It is also the fourth largest producer of greenhouse gas emissions.

UK: Kingsnorth power station plans shelved by E.ON
by Mark TranThe Guardian (UK)
October 7th, 2009
E.ON, the German energy group, has effectively thrown in the towel on its plans to build a new coal-power station at Kingsnorth, UK, blaming the recession. Kingsnorth has been shrouded in controversy ever since inception, with protests over several years including a high-profile Climate Camp protest.

IVORY COAST: Toxic waste: company to pay
by AFPTimes Live
September 17th, 2009
Victims will receive compensation after seeking legal action in Britain against Trafigura oil company. Waste from a ship the company chartered was illegally dumped in Abidjan, killing 17 people and causing more than 100,000 to seek medical help in 2006.

US: Clean Water Laws Are Neglected, at a Cost in Suffering
by Charles DuhiggNew York Times
September 12th, 2009
Violations of the Clean Water Act have risen steadily across the nation, an extensive review of water pollution records by The New York Times found. Polluters include small companies, like gas stations, dry cleaners, and shopping malls. They also include large operations, like chemical factories, power plants, sewage treatment centers and one of the biggest zinc smelters, the Horsehead Corporation of Pennsylvania.

US: Tar-sands oil standoff brews in Minnesota
by Leslie Brooks Suzukamo TwinCities.com - Pioneer Press
September 9th, 2009
The fight over global warming and Canadian oil is heating up. A group of oil companies and big industries launched a campaign to try to snuff out rules that might raise the cost of piping Canadian tar-sands oil through the Dakotas to refineries in the Twin Cities. Meanwhile, environmentalists are trying to stop tar-sands oil, claiming it is some of the dirtiest petroleum on Earth.

ECUADOR: Chevron Offers Evidence in Ecuador Bribery Case
by ReutersNew York Times
September 7th, 2009
On Monday Chevron said it gave Ecuadorean authorities evidence of a bribery scheme linked to a $27 billion environmental damages lawsuit against the oil company. Last week, the judge hearing the case, Juan Núñez, recused himself. The Amazon Defense Coalition said the recusal did not “change the overwhelming evidence against Chevron.”

FIJI: Fiji Water: Spin the Bottle
by Anna LenzerMother Jones
August 17th, 2009
Obama sips it. Paris Hilton loves it. Mary J. Blige won't sing without it. How did a plastic water bottle, imported from a military dictatorship thousands of miles away, become the epitome of cool?

SOUTH AMERICA: Plundering the Amazon
by Michael Smith and Adriana BrasileiroBloomberg.com
August 16th, 2009
Alcoa and Cargill have bypassed laws designed to prevent destruction of the world’s largest rain forest, Brazilian prosecutors say. The damage wrought by scores of companies is robbing the earth of its best shield against global warming.

UK: Two men and a website mount vendetta against an oil giant
by  Danny FortsonSunday Times (UK)
July 19th, 2009
In Colchester, Essex, John and Alfred Donovan are compiling perhaps the world's largest dossier on Royal Dutch Shell, at royaldutchshellplc.com. It's an awkward position for Shell, this month crowned by Fortune magazine as the world’s largest company, as trying to shut the website down would draw even more attention to it.

UK: Two men and a website mount vendetta against an oil giant
by Danny FortsonThe Sunday Times (UK)
July 19th, 2009
In Colchester, Essex, John and Alfred Donovan are compiling perhaps the world's largest dossier on Royal Dutch Shell, at royaldutchshellplc.com. It's an awkward position for Shell, this month crowned by Fortune magazine as the world’s largest company, as trying to shut the website down would draw even more attention to it.

US: Sued by the forest
by Rebecca Tuhus-DubrowThe Boston Globe
July 19th, 2009
Last February, the town of Shapleigh, Maine, population 2,326, passed an unusual ordinance. Like nearby towns, Shapleigh sought to protect its aquifers from the Nestle Corporation, which draws heavily on the region for its Poland Spring bottled water. Shapleigh tried something new. At a town meeting, residents voted to endow all of the town’s natural assets with legal rights.

TANZANIA: The human cost of gold: And a deadly price to pay
This Day Tanzania
June 30th, 2009
Villagers living near a gold mine owned and run by Canada’s Barrick Gold Corp. in Tarime District, Mara Region are demanding the immediate closure of the project, saying they are paying a deadly price for the mining activities in the area.

UK: Fears for safety as nuclear watchdog hires staff from firms pitching to build reactors
by Tim WebbThe Guardian
June 26th, 2009
In another example of the revolving door between industry and government, the UK Nuclear Installations Inspectorate is recruiting more than a dozen project managers to speed up its review of new nuclear reactor designs – even though those managers work for the companies hoping to build the reactors.

ECUADOR: Chevron's Amazon 'fake cleanup' trial
United Press International
June 25th, 2009
A report submitted this week to a court in Ecuador finding dangerous levels of contamination at oil wells Chevron says it cleaned up in the 1990s is expected to reinforce a fraud indictment against two Chevron lawyers in a $27.3 billion environmental lawsuit against the oil company.

AFRICA: Blood diamond scheme 'is failing'
BBC News
June 24th, 2009
Officials are meeting to review the Kimberley Process, amid criticism that the scheme, set up to certify the origin of diamonds to assure consumers that by purchasing diamonds they are not financing war and human rights abuses, is failing. The Kimberley Process emerged from global outrage over conflicts in countries like Liberia and Sierra Leone, largely funded by the plundering of diamond resources.

CANADA/US: A Delicate Undertaking: Virgin Forests Going Down the Toilet
by Bryan WalshTime in partnership with CNN
June 10th, 2009
Major toilet paper brands like Kleenex, Scott and Cottonelle are using paper from North American virgin forests to produce toilet paper.

A Delicate Undertaking: Virgin Forests Going Down the Toilet
by Bryan WalshTime in partnership with CNN
June 10th, 2009
Major toilet paper brands like Kleenex, Scott and Cottonelle are using paper from North American virgin forests to produce toilet paper.

NIGERIA: Shell to Pay $15.5 Million to Settle Nigerian Case
by Jad MouawadNew York Times
June 8th, 2009
Royal Dutch Shell agreed to pay $15.5 million to settle a case accusing it of taking part in human rights abuses in the Niger Delta, a striking sum given it has denied any wrongdoing. Ken Saro-Wiwa, Shell’s most prominent critic at the time in Nigeria, was hanged in 1995 by that country’s military regime after protesting Shell's environmental practices in the oil-rich delta, especially in his native Ogoni region.

INDONESIA: Scramble for coal assets in Indonesia
by Sundeep Tucker and John AglionbyFinancial Times
June 7th, 2009
Some of the world’s largest energy groups are scrambling to acquire coal mining assets in Indonesia as family-run conglomerates consider divestments to raise cash. Peabody Energy, the US coal miner, and Xstrata, the Anglo-Swiss miner, are believed to be among those interested. Industry analysts said Chinese, South Korean, Indian and Middle Eastern companies were also scouring Indonesia for assets.

US: 'Roadless' Forest Areas Now Under Vilsack
by David A. FahrentholdWashington Post
May 29th, 2009
U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack issued a temporary order yesterday governing development in "roadless" areas of national forests, requiring all new projects to be approved by him personally. A USDA official said it is unclear whether projects with a strictly commercial aim, such as logging or mining, will be allowed.

FINLAND: In Finland, Nuclear Renaissance Runs Into Trouble
by James KanterNew York Times
May 28th, 2009
As the Obama administration tries to steer America toward cleaner sources of energy, it would do well to consider the cautionary tale of this new-generation nuclear reactor site. The massive power plant under construction on muddy terrain on this Finnish island was supposed to be the showpiece of a nuclear renaissance. But things have not gone as planned.

US: Chevron annual meeting heats up over Ecuador suit
by Jordan RobertsonWashington Post
May 27th, 2009
In a combative and sometimes colorful annual meeting, Chevron's CEO and chairman exchanged barbs with activists over pollution in the Amazon rain forest and the company's human rights record. The nation's second-largest oil company is awaiting a verdict from a judge in Ecuador that could come with a $27 billion price tag.

EUROPE: Greenpeace warns on Shell oil sands projects
by Carola HoyosFinancial Times
May 18th, 2009
A study by Greenpeace and several other environmental groups has concluded that Royal Dutch Shell's carbon intensity will rise 85 per cent as it develops its oil and gas fields in the coming years. Campaigners warn Shell’s investors that this disadvantages the company vis a vis its peers as US and European policymakers move towards a broad cap-and-trade system to limit carbon emissions. Shell’s growing carbon intensity stems from its resource base, which is heavily made up of Canadian oil and Nigerian gas.

UK: Shell faces investor fury over pay, pollution and human rights
by Terry MacalisterThe Guardian
May 17th, 2009

ECUADOR: In Ecuador, Resentment of an Oil Company Oozes
by SIMON ROMERO and CLIFFORD KRAUSSNew York Times
May 14th, 2009
Texaco, the American oil company that Chevron acquired in 2001, once poured oil waste into pits used decades ago for drilling wells in Ecuador's northeastern jungle. Texaco’s roughnecks are long gone, but black gunk from the pits seeps to the topsoil here and in dozens of other spots. These days the only Chevron employees who visit the former oil fields do so escorted by bodyguards toting guns. They represent one side in a bitter fight that is developing into the world’s largest environmental lawsuit, with $27 billion in potential damages.

WORLD: When Chevron Hires Ex-Reporter to Investigate Pollution, Chevron Looks Good
by Brian StelterNew York Times
May 10th, 2009
When Chevron learned that “60 Minutes” was preparing a potentially damaging report about oil company contamination of the Amazon rain forest in Ecuador, it hired a former journalist to produce a mirror image of the report, from the corporation’s point of view. An Ecuadorean judge is expected to rule soon on whether Chevron owes up to $27 billion in damages.

CHINA: Slump Tilts Priorities of Industry in China
by Jonathan AnsfieldNew York Times
April 18th, 2009
Less than a year ago, officials pressed mines and factories in northern China to shut down or move away to clear the air for the Beijing Olympics. Now, amid the global economic downturn, priorities have shifted. Cumbersome environmental reviews have been accelerated, and China’s powerful state oil companies are pushing hard to postpone nationwide rollout of clean air standards due to the billions of dollars required to invest in their refineries to produce clean diesel.

US/NIGERIA: Shell: corporate impunity goes on trial
by George MonbiotThe Guardian
April 7th, 2009
Multinationals accused of human rights abuses can no longer feel safe now that the oil giant is facing allegations of complicity in the execution of Nigerian activist Ken Saro-Wiwa.

US: Oil Giants Loath to Follow Obama’s Green Lead
by Jad MouawadNew York Times
April 7th, 2009
The Obama administration seeks the most ambitious transformation of energy policy in a generation. But Big Oil is not on board. Royal Dutch Shell said last month that it would freeze research and investments in wind, solar and hydrogen power, and focus its alternative energy efforts on biofuels. BP, a company that has spent nine years saying it was moving “beyond petroleum,” has been getting back to petroleum since 2007, paring back its renewable program. The list goes on.

AFRICA/CHINA: As Chinese Investment in Africa Drops, Hope Sinks
by Lydia PolgreenNew York Times
March 25th, 2009
As global commodity prices have plummeted and several of China’s partners in Africa have stumbled deeper into chaos, China has backed away from some of its riskiest and most aggressive plans. China has sought to secure minerals in Africa through agreements to build huge projects in exchange for minerals. African governments are now realizing that these deals are loans against future revenue, and falling prices could leave them saddled with debt.

US/CANADA: Alaskan lake’s fate could echo across continent
by Todd WilkinsonChristian Science Monitor
March 24th, 2009
A landmark legal case now before the US Supreme Court holds huge implications for lakes across the continent. Nearly four decades the Clean Water Act was passed to protect waterways from industrial pollution, a proposal by Coeur d’Alene Mines Corp. to dispose of tons of effluent in Alaska's Lower Slate Lake has sparked an international debate.

CHILE: Chilean Town Withers in Free Market for Water
by Alexei BarrionuevoNew York Times
March 15th, 2009
Nowhere is the system for buying and selling water more permissive than in Chile, where water rights are private property, not a public resource, and can be traded like commodities with little government oversight or safeguards for the environment. The small town of Quillaga is being swallowed up in the country’s intensifying water wars.

ECUADOR/CANADA: Canadian Mining Firm Financed Violence in Ecuador: Lawsuit
by Jennifer MooreTyee Online
March 3rd, 2009
Three villagers from the valley of Intag in northwestern Ecuador are suing Copper Mesa Mining Corporation and the Toronto Stock Exchange. They allege not enough has been done to reduce the risk of harm being faced by farmers and community leaders who have faced violent threats and attacks for opposition to a large open-pit copper mine in their pristine cloud forests.

EUROPE: Europe to Allow Two Bans on Genetically Altered Crops
by James KanterNew York Times
March 2nd, 2009
European Union governments delivered a blow Monday to the biotechnology industry, allowing Austria and Hungary to maintain national bans on growing genetically modified crops from Monsanto. The market for genetically engineered crops is worth several billion dollars worldwide.

CANADA: The Canadian Oil Boom: Scraping Bottom
by Robert KunzigNational Geographic
March 1st, 2009
Once considered too expensive, as well as too damaging to the land, exploitation of Alberta's oil sands is now a gamble worth billions. Syncrude and Suncor are two of the largest producers of bitumen; Canada is now the largest importer of oil to the United States, with tar sands exploitation slated to increase rapidly over the next five years.

US: Mr. Whipple Left It Out: Soft Is Rough on Forests
by Leslie KaufmanNew York Times
February 25th, 2009
The U.S. obsession with soft toilet paper has driven the growth of brands like Cottonelle Ultra, Quilted Northern Ultra and Charmin Ultra. But fluffiness comes at a price: millions of trees harvested in North America and in Latin American countries, including some percentage of trees from rare old-growth forests in Canada.

US: Board cancels hearing under Bayer pressure
by Ken Ward, Jr.The Charleston Gazette
February 25th, 2009
The U.S. Chemical Safety Board has canceled a public meeting to brief local residents on its investigation of an August 2008 explosion that killed two Bayer Institute plant workers. Chemical plant security activists expressed shock; the meeting was also to discuss concerns about a methyl isocyanate tank located near the site of the deadly blast.

US: Plant That Spilled Coal Ash Had Earlier Leak Problems
by John M. BroderNew York Times
January 8th, 2009
The chief executive of the Tennessee Valley Authority, which operates the coal-burning power plant responsible for an enormous flood of coal ash in East Tennessee late last month, acknowledged Thursday that the plant’s containment ponds had leaked two other times in the last five years but had not been adequately repaired.

WORLD: Workforce deaths at Shell higher than for other western oil groups
by Ed CrooksFinancial Times
December 1st, 2008
Royal Dutch Shell last year suffered more workforce deaths than any other large western oil company. Two employees and 28 contractors were killed working for Shell in 2007. Nine of last year's deaths were in Nigeria, with two people killed in attacks on Shell facilities, and 10 in Russia.

CANADA/IRAQ: Drill, Garner, Drill
by Anthony FentonMother Jones
November 24th, 2008
In the history of the Iraq War, one name is perhaps synonymous with the collapse of the Bush administration's hopes for a post-Saddam world: Retired Lt. General Jay M. Garner, who served as the first post-war administrator. This year, he and a small group of former US military leaders, officials, and lobbyists have quietly used their Kurdistan connections to help Canadian companies access some of the region's richest oil fields.

US: Court Says Shell Can’t Drill Near Alaska
by JAD MOUAWADThe New York Times
November 20th, 2008
A federal appeals court on Thursday blocked Royal Dutch Shell from drilling oil wells off Alaska’s North Slope after finding that the Interior Department had failed to conduct an environmental study before issuing the company’s drilling permit.

US: PacifiCorp Agrees To Remove Dams
by Jim CarltonThe Wall Street Journal
November 13th, 2008
Electric utility PacifiCorp has tentatively agreed to remove four dams from the Klamath River, in a deal that would end one of the West's most rancorous water disputes and could serve as a settlement model for similar fights.

US: Justices Revoke Limits On Navy Use of Sonar
by Jerry Markon and Juliet EilperinWashington Post
November 13th, 2008
The justices voted 6 to 3 to lift restrictions on the Navy's use of sonar off the Southern California coast, backing the military in a longstanding battle over whether anti-submarine training harms marine mammals.

VIETNAM: Vietnam Cracks Down on Polluters
by Martha Ann OverlandTIME
October 17th, 2008
Long before a government report confirmed it, villagers living along the banks of the Thi Vai river in the Mekong Delta knew full well that the waterway was dead. They had complained for years that industrial waste discharged into the Thi Vai had poisoned their wells, killed all the fish and was making them sick. Yet it wasn't until cargo companies refused to dock at the river's main port — saying that the toxic brew was eating through the ships' hulls — that Vietnam officials were willing to get tough on polluters.

CANADA: OIL SANDS-PART 2: "Where I Come From Is Ground Zero"
by Chris ArsenaultInter Press Service (IPS)
October 17th, 2008
Like many young people from Ft. Chipewayn, Mercredi knows the tar sands well; he spent four years making big money driving trucks at one of the mines. "I just walked off the job one night, I thought 'this is wrong, we're destroying our own land'," said Mercredi.

CANADA: OIL SANDS-PART 1: Showdown at Ft. McMoney
by Chris ArsenaultInter Press Service (IPS)
October 16th, 2008
The sun rises in a bright, red line over flat land, small lakes, boreal forest and peat bogs as our small double engine plane bumps through early morning turbulence between Edmonton and Ft. McMurray, Canada.

CHILE: Native Community in Desert Oasis Threatened by Mines
by Daniela EstradaInter Press News Service (IPS)
October 9th, 2008
The Diaguita indigenous community in Huasco Alto, surrounded by rich gold, silver and copper deposits in the northern Chilean region of Atacama, are engaged in a struggle to prevent mining projects from infringing on their territory and destroying their way of life and ancestral identity.

US: More BP refinery doubts
Journal Gazette
October 7th, 2008
Smoke rises from the Whiting refinery now owned by BP. Federal regulators are questioning BP’s permit process. According to the EPA, the agency “now has information suggesting that BP may have begun a project to process Canadian crude oil at the refinery in 2005 without the proper permit.”

PHILIPPINES: Execs urged: Act on river pollution
by Bernadette ParcoCebu Daily News (Philippines)
October 6th, 2008
Environmentalists called on local government officials in Toledo City to actively monitor the ecosystem in the area following reports that a mining company discharged wastewater into the Sapangdaku River.

US: California's Number One Inland Oil Polluter in Trouble Again
Enviroment News Service
October 3rd, 2008
An oil company that state and federal officials have called California's number one inland oil polluter has failed to meet multiple deadlines to clean up leaks from settling ponds on one of its leases, so the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency this week took over partial cleanup operations to ensure they are completed before the rainy season.

INDIA: In Sore Need of E-Waste Regulation
by Keya AcharyaInter Press News Service (IPS)
October 2nd, 2008
India’s lack of safe electronic waste-disposal is growing to a crisis situation, needing strong laws to control the situation, say experts.

US: Mosaic threatens $618 million lawsuit
by Frank GluckHerald Tribune
September 30th, 2008
Florida mining giant Mosaic Fertilizer said Monday it will file a $618 million lawsuit against Manatee County unless commissioners reverse a Sept. 16 vote that denied permission for Mosaic to mine phosphate on a property in Duette.

US: EPA sues Bradley Mining Co. for cleanup costs
Associated Press
September 30th, 2008
The federal government has filed a $7 million lawsuit against Bradley Mining Company, in an attempt to recover costs it says the Forest Service and Environmental Protection Agency incurred cleaning up arsenic-laden mining waste.

CANADA: High stakes in Canada’s vast oil-sands fields
by George TombsChristian Science Monitor
September 30th, 2008
Trillions of dollars’ worth of oil are present, but the environmental costs are high, too – and growing.

US: An Inconvenient Bag
by ELLEN GAMERMAN Wall Street Journal
September 26th, 2008
It's manufactured in China, shipped thousands of miles overseas, made with plastic and could take years to decompose. It's also the hot "green" giveaway of the moment: the reusable shopping bag.

US: Martinez Shell Refinery To Pay $300,000 Penalty For Spill
KTVU News
September 25th, 2008
The operator of the Shell refinery in Martinez has agreed to pay $300,000 to settle a civil lawsuit charging that the refinery negligently caused about 10 barrels of oil to spill into the Carquinez Strait in Martinez in 2006, according to the Contra Costa District Attorney's office.

WORLD: Oil Companies' "Self-Policing" a Dismal Failure
by Alison RaphaelInter Press News Service (IPS)
September 24th, 2008
The intersection of human rights, the environment and corporate responsibility was highlighted today at a Capitol Hill hearing featuring activists from Burma and Nigeria who underlined the failure to date of "voluntary" controls over major oil companies operating in their countries.

INDIA: India Grapples With How to Convert Its Farmland Into Factories
by Somini SenguptaNew York Times
September 17th, 2008
On the eve of opening a new auto factory in West Bengal, arranged via secret contract with the government, Indian industrial giant Tata is facing massive protests by local farmers determined not to be pushed off their land.

ECUADOR: Chevron lawyers indicted in pollution case
by David BakerSan Francisco Chronicle
September 13th, 2008
Two Chevron Corp. lawyers fighting a landmark pollution lawsuit in Ecuador have been indicted by that country's prosecutor general, a move the company says proves the government is trying to tamper with the suit.

US: Files Show Governor Intervened With Court
by Ian UrbinaNew York Times
August 13th, 2008
West Virginia Governor Joe Manchin III filed a friend-of-the-court brief in June, arguing the State Supreme Court should review a $382 million judgment against DuPont. The case involves thousands of residents in the area of a DuPont-operated zinc-smelting plant, and the largest civil penalty ever levied against the company, for the dumping of toxic arsenic, cadmium and lead at the plant.

FRANCE: Pipe Break Causes Leak Of Uranium at French Plant
Associated Press
July 21st, 2008
Uranium-bearing liquid has leaked from a broken underground pipe at a nuclear site in southeastern France, the national nuclear-safety authority said Friday in the second leak discovered at a French site this month.

US: Toxic Smoke and Mirrors
by Jim MorrisMother Jones
Filed in federal District Court in Cleveland, their claim joined thousands of others pending against welding-products manufacturers in state and federal courts. (Employers have not been among the targets because lawyers generally concluded they were ignorant of the metal's dangers.)

FRANCE: Areva mishandled uranium leak: safety body
by Joseph Tandy and Muriel BoselliReuters
July 11th, 2008
France's nuclear safety authority (ASN) said on Friday that Areva-subsidiary Socatri had poorly managed a leak of liquid containing uranium that occurred in southeastern France this week.

INDIA: Decades Later, Toxic Sludge Torments Bhopal
by Somini SenguptaNew York Times
July 7th, 2008
Residents of Bhopal, India continue to suffer from Union Carbide's toxic legacy, this time in the form of toxic waste that still languishes inside a shoddy warehouse on the old factory grounds. Ailments such as cleft palates and mental retardation are appearing in numbers of Bhopali children, raising questions about contaminated soil and groundwater, clean-up, and liability.

Iraq: U.S. Advised Iraqi Ministry on Oil Deals
by Andrew E. KramerNew York Times
June 30th, 2008
The Bush administration has disclosed that U.S. advisors in Iraq played a key role in drawing up contracts between the Iraqi government and five major Western oil companies. The no-bid contracts are expected to be awarded Monday to Exxon Mobil, Shell, BP, Total and Chevron, as well as to several smaller oil companies.

US: Court slashes damages award in Exxon oil spill
by PETE YOSTAssociated Press
June 25th, 2008
The Supreme Court on Wednesday slashed the $2.5 billion punitive damages award in the Exxon Valdez disaster to $500 million, a decision that could have broader implications for limiting how much courts can order businesses to pay.

US: Justices Take Case on Navy Use of Sonar
by LINDA GREENHOUSEThe New York Times
June 24th, 2008
The Supreme Court on Monday stepped into a long-running environmental dispute over the impact on whales and other marine mammals of Navy training exercises off Southern California.

US: Put oil firm chiefs on trial, says leading climate change scientist
by Ed PilkingtonGuardian (UK)
June 23rd, 2008
On June 23, James Hansen, a leading world climate scientist, called for the executives of major fossil fuel companies, including ExxonMobil and Peabody Energy, to be put on trial for crimes against humanity and nature through actions like funding climate skeptics to undermine global consensus around combating climate change.

US: Justices Turn Down Appeal by Exxon
REUTERS
June 17th, 2008
The Supreme Court declined on Monday to hear an appeal by Exxon Mobil seeking to dismiss a lawsuit by 11 Indonesian villagers.

EUROPE: Chemical Law Has Global Impact
by Lyndsey LaytonWashington Post
June 12th, 2008
Europe this month rolled out new restrictions on makers of chemicals linked to cancer and other health problems. The changes follow eight years of vigorous opposition from the U.S. chemical industry giants like DuPont, and the Bush administration.

US: Bush administration files nuclear dump application
by H. JOSEF HEBERTAssociated Press
June 3rd, 2008
Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman said Tuesday he's confident the government's license application to build a nuclear waste dump in Nevada will "stand up to any challenge anywhere."

US: Former Colo. nuke plant contractors ordered to pay $925M
AP
June 3rd, 2008
Two companies that worked as contractors with the now-defunct Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant have been ordered to pay $925 million to residents who claimed that contamination blown from the facility endangered people's health and devalued their property.

BRAZIL: Businessman alleges Alstom paid bribes for Brazil project: report
AFP
May 29th, 2008
French engineering group Alstom allegedly paid nearly a million dollars in bribes in connection with a Brazilian energy plant, testimony from a Brazilian businessman reported in the press here said Thursday.

US: Exxon investors reject green initiatives
by Andrew ClarkThe Guardian
May 29th, 2008
The world's biggest oil company emerged bruised but victorious from a bust-up with the billionaire Rockefeller family yesterday as an effort to foist green initiatives on ExxonMobil failed to capture wholehearted support from shareholders.

US: Rockefellers Seek Change at Exxon
by CLIFFORD KRAUSSThe New York Times
May 27th, 2008
The family members have thrown their support behind a shareholder rebellion that is ruffling feathers at Exxon Mobil, the giant oil company descended from John D. Rockefeller's Standard Oil Trust.

US: Oil Industry, Lawmakers Aim To Lift Bans on Drilling
by RUSSELL GOLD BEN CASSELMAN and STEPHEN POWERWall Street Journal
May 23rd, 2008
Mounting concerns about global energy supply are fueling a drive by the oil industry and some U.S. lawmakers to end longstanding bans on domestic drilling put in place to protect environmentally sensitive areas.

GERMANY: Pesticides: Germany bans chemicals linked to honeybee devastation
by Alison BenjaminThe Guardian (UK)
May 23rd, 2008
Germany has banned a family of pesticides that are blamed for the deaths of millions of honeybees. The German Federal Office of Consumer Protection and Food Safety (BVL) has suspended the registration for eight pesticide seed treatment products used in rapeseed oil and sweetcorn.

UK: Shell 'selling suicide' by preferring tar sands to wind
by Terry MacalisterThe Guardian
May 21st, 2008
Shell was accused yesterday of "selling suicide on the forecourt" by pressing ahead with tar sands operations in Canada and continuing to flare off excess gas in Nigeria while pulling out of renewable schemes such as the London Array - the world's largest offshore wind scheme.

NETHERLANDS: Nigerians seek damages from Shell over pollution
by Arthur MaxBusiness Week
May 14th, 2008
Four Nigerian villagers and the environmental group Friends of the Earth are demanding Shell take responsibility for damage from oil leaks caused by its Nigerian subsidiary, lawyers said Wednesday.

LUXEMBOURG: Mittal braced for protests on pollution
by Heather StewartThe Observer
May 11th, 2008
Steel giant ArcelorMittal will be accused of leaving a trail of environmental destruction in its wake this week when campaigners descend on Luxembourg to protest at its annual meeting.

RUSSIA: As Gazprom Goes, So Goes Russia
by Andrew E. KramerNew York Times
May 11th, 2008
Gazprom and the Russian government have long had a close relationship, but the revolving door between them is spinning especially fast this year. But Gazprom also epitomizes the risks of state capitalism: waste and inefficiency.

CHINA: In China City, Protesters See Pollution Risk of New Plant
by Edward WongNew York Times
May 6th, 2008
Residents took to the streets of Chengdu to protest a $5.5 billion ethylene plant under construction by PetroChina, reflecting a surge in environmental awareness by urban, middle-class Chinese determined to protect their health and the value of their property.

ECUADOR: Expert asks Ecuador court to fine Chevron $7-$16 bln
Reuters
April 2nd, 2008
An independent environmental expert told a court in Ecuador that oil company Chevron Corp should pay $7 billion to $16 billion in compensation for environmental damage in the country.

US: Alcoa lawsuit halted so federal criminal probe can continue
by Associated PressInternational Herald Tribune
March 28th, 2008
A civil lawsuit accusing Alcoa Inc. and affiliates of bribing officials in the Persian Gulf state of Bahrain will be temporarily halted so that U.S. investigators can conduct a criminal investigation of the aluminum maker.

CHILE: Salmon Virus Indicts Chile’s Fishing Methods
by ALEXEI BARRIONUEVOThe New York Times
March 27th, 2008
The new virus is spreading, but it has primarily affected the fish of Marine Harvest, a Norwegian company that is the world’s biggest producer of farm-raised salmon and exports about 20 percent of the salmon that come from Chile.

INDONESIA: Indonesia's Commodity Boom Is a Mixed Bag
by Tom WrightWall Street Journal
March 24th, 2008
Indonesia's economy is riding the recent wave of high global commodity prices. But local pressure is arising towards steel makers and power producers in China and India who have diverted coal supplies abroad by locking in 20-year supply contracts with Indonesian miners.

US: Study says diesel emissions raise cancer risk
by Elizabeth Fernandez, Chronicle Staff WriterThe San Francisco Chronicle
March 20th, 2008
The analysis by the California Air Resources Board, released Wednesday night, shows that the greatest health dangers related to toxic air emissions stems from diesel trucks traversing the freeways and other roadways around West Oakland and the Port of Oakland.

US: Families Sue Chiquita in Deaths of 5 Men
by CARMEN GENTILEThe New York Times
March 17th, 2008
Last week, Ms. Julin, who has remarried, and the widows of the four other men filed a lawsuit against Chiquita Brands International Inc., saying the company contributed to their husbands’ deaths by financing the leftist group.

US: Pollution Is Called a Byproduct of a 'Clean' Fuel
by BRENDA GOODMANThe New York Times
March 11th, 2008
The spills, at the Alabama Biodiesel Corporation plant outside this city about 17 miles from Tuscaloosa, are similar to others that have come from biofuel plants in the Midwest. The discharges, which can be hazardous to birds and fish, have many people scratching their heads over the seeming incongruity of pollution from an industry that sells products with the promise of blue skies and clear streams.

CHINA: Solar Energy Firms Leave Waste Behind in China
by Ariana Eunjung ChaWashington Post
March 9th, 2008
The Luoyang Zhonggui High-Technology Co. of Henan, China, is a green energy company, producing polysilicon for solar energy panels. But the byproduct -- silicon tetrachloride -- is a highly toxic substance that poses environmental hazards.

US: Pesticide maker owned by political donor
by Matthew YiSan Francisco Chronicle
March 8th, 2008
The company that makes one of the pesticides state officials are considering spraying over the Bay Area to fight the light brown apple moth is owned by a wealthy California agribusinessman who has been a generous contributor to Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and other state officials.

CANADA: Native Leader Serving Six Months for Opposing Mine
by Chris ArsenaultIPS
March 5th, 2008
Algonquin community leader Robert Lovelace had never been charged with an offence, but when a uranium company began prospecting for radioactive ore on unceded native land without engaging in consultation, he decided to take action, organising a non-violent blockade.

BRAZIL: King of soya: environmental vandal or saviour of the world's poor?
by Rory Carroll and Tom PhillipsGuardian (UK)
March 3rd, 2008
Erai Maggi's company Bom Futuro produces more than 600,000 tonnes of soya a year, most of it to feed livestock ending up as meat in China and Europe, and generating £175m in revenue. Critics decry the link between increasing soya production and Amazon deforestation.

UGANDA: Privatization of Seeds Moving Apace
by Aileen KwaIPS
February 21st, 2008
The Ugandan parliament will soon have a hearing on the draft Plant Variety Protection Bill, approved by the cabinet early last year. According to an inside government source, seeds companies including Monsanto have been lobbying for such intellectual property protection.

KAZAKHSTAN: Kazakhs warn Mittal over safety
by Isabel Gorst in Moscow and Peter Marsh in LondonThe Financial Times Limited 2008
February 19th, 2008
Kazakhstan has warned ArcelorMittal, the world’s biggest steel company, that it could be forced to close one of its coal mines if it does not improve safety following an explosion last month that killed 30 people.

GLOBAL: 2 Reports At Odds On Biotech Crops
by Rick WeissThe Washington Post
February 14th, 2008
Dueling reports released yesterday -- one by a consortium largely funded by the biotech industry and the other by a pair of environmental and consumer groups -- came to those diametrically different conclusions.

US: U.S. jewelry retailers oppose large Alaska gold mine
by Mary PembertonTHE ASSOCIATED PRESS
February 12th, 2008
Just in time for Valentine's Day, five of the leading U.S. jewellers have sworn off gold that someday could come from the Pebble Mine, a huge deposit being scoped out by a subsidiary of a Canadian company near the world's most productive wild sockeye salmon stream in southwestern Alaska.

US-CHINA: Staples cuts ties with APP on environment worry
Reuters
February 8th, 2008
Staples Inc, the largest U.S. office supplies retailer, said on Friday it ceased doing business with Asia Pulp & Paper (APP) late last month because of environmental concerns.

US: Uranium Exploration Near Grand Canyon
by FELICITY BARRINGERThe New York Times
February 7th, 2008
With minimal public notice and no formal environmental review, the Forest Service has approved a permit allowing a British mining company to explore for uranium just outside Grand Canyon National Park, less than three miles from a popular lookout over the canyon’s southern rim.

EL SALVADOR: "Life Is Worth More than Gold" Say Anti-Mining Activists
by Raúl GutiérrezInter Press Service (IPS)
February 1st, 2008
Peasant farmers from the northern Salvadoran province of Cabañas fear that mining operations planned for the region will consume 30,000 litres of water a day, drawn from the same sources that currently provide local residents with water only once a week.

US: An Ex-President, a Mining Deal and a Big Donor
by JO BECKER and DON VAN NATTA Jr.The New York Times
January 31st, 2008
Unlike more established competitors, Mr. Giustra was a newcomer to uranium mining in Kazakhstan, a former Soviet republic. But what his fledgling company lacked in experience, it made up for in connections. Accompanying Mr. Giustra on his luxuriously appointed MD-87 jet that day was a former president of the United States, Bill Clinton.

PERU: For Peru's Indians, Lawsuit Against Big Oil Reflects a New Era
by Kelly HearnThe Washington Post
January 31st, 2008
Oxy is Occidental Petroleum, the California-based company that pulled a fortune from this rain forest from 1972 to 2000. It is also the company that Maynas and other Achuar leaders now blame for wreaking environmental havoc -- and leaving many of the people here ill.

GLOBAL: False 'Green' Ads Draw Global Scrutiny
by Tom WrightWall Street Journal
January 30th, 2008
With companies eager to tout their "green" credentials to consumers, advertising watchdogs are stepping up efforts to rein in marketers that make false or exaggerated claims.

UK: Vestey's vegan grandson sees off Shell
by Isabel OakeshottThe Sunday Times (UK)
January 27th, 2008
SHELL has abandoned its sponsorship of one of Britain’s most prestigious wildlife photography exhibitions after protests by environmental groups.

US: Protests Greet Nuclear Power Resurgence in US South
by Matthew CardinaleIPS
January 14th, 2008
Residents and environmental activists are in a bitter dispute with large U.S. energy corporations and the federal government over the safety of nuclear power, as more than a dozen corporations plan to, or have filed, paperwork to open new nuclear power plants, primarily in the U.S. South.

NIGERIA: Inefficient Gas Flaring Remains Unchecked
by Sam OlukoyaIPS
January 10th, 2008
Some of the largest multinational oil companies in the world -- including the U.K. and Dutch owned Shell, the French company Total, and the American companies Mobil and Chevron -- are responsible for the bulk of the scores of gas flares burning in Nigeria.

THAILAND: Green Groups Will Take GM Crops Issue To Court
by Marwaan Macan-MarkarIPS News
January 9th, 2008
Thai environmentalists are banking on the country’s courts to overturn a decision by the military-appointed government to allow field trials of genetically modified (GM) crops.

US: U.S. high court declines to review Can. company pollution ruling
by JOHN K. WILEYAssociated Press
January 7th, 2008
An Indian tribe says it will continue its efforts to force a Canadian company, Teck Cominco Ltd., to pay to clean up pollution of a stretch of the Columbia River that flows past the tribe's reservation.

US: Cloned Livestock Poised
by Jane Zhang, John W. Miller and Lauren EtterWall Street Journal
January 4th, 2008
After more than six years of wrestling with the question of whether meat and milk from cloned animals and their offspring are safe to eat, the Food and Drug Administration is expected to declare as early as next week that they are. The food industry appears to be divided over the issue.

US: Suit says IBM dumped chemicals in New York state
by Dan Wilchins and Philipp GollnerReuters
January 3rd, 2008
Neighbors of a former IBM plant in New York state sued the company on Thursday, saying it released chemicals into the air, ground and water for nearly 80 years that caused birth defects and cancer.

US: Former miners oppose bond release
by Nathan BlackfordWarrick Publishing Online
January 2nd, 2008
Former miners do not want the Indiana Department of Natural Resources to release the final portion of a $4 million bond on a large section of the North Field at the Squaw Creek Mine.

EUROPE/RUSSIA: Gas pipeline stirs up Baltic fears
by Tristana MooreBBC News Online
December 31st, 2007
Nord Stream, a consortium led by Russia's Gazprom, is building a new controversial pipeline under the Baltic Sea.

JAMAICA: Regulators Mull Viability of Ferti-irrigation
by Patricia WilliamsIPS News
December 26th, 2007
Appleton Estates seemed to have solved the centuries old problem of what to do with distillery waste when they started a new project eight years ago. However, they are yet to convince regulators and locals that it is a viable option.

EUROPE: Both Sides Cite Science to Address Altered Corn
by Elisabeth RosenthalNew York Times
December 26th, 2007
A proposal made by Europe’s top environment official, to ban the planting of a genetically modified corn strain produced by companies like Syngenta and Monsanto, sets up a bitter war within the European Union.

SOUTH KOREA: South Korea Arrests 2 Captains in Huge Oil Spill
Agence France Press
December 25th, 2007
The South Korean Coast Guard said Monday that it had arrested the captains of a barge owned by Samsung Heavy Industry and a tugboat that caused an oil spill this month, the nation’s worst.

CHINA/US: The Recalls’ Aftershocks
by Louise Story and David BarbozaNew York Times
December 22nd, 2007
Toy makers are investigating whether they need to treat their tainted products with stabilization chemicals or if they must seal the toys in giant polyethylene bags.

CHINA: China Grabs West’s Smoke-Spewing Factories
by Joseph Kahn and Mark LandlerNew York Times
December 21st, 2007
In its rush to re-create the industrial revolution that made the West rich, China has absorbed most of the major industries that once made the West dirty.

EUROPE: Europe Proposes Binding Limits on Auto Emissions
by James KanterNew York Times
December 20th, 2007
European Union officials told leading automakers to make deep cuts in tailpipe emissions of the cars they produce or face fines that could reach billions of euros. Companies including Volkswagen and Renault immediately promised a fight to weaken the proposed legislation.

GLOBAL: Mining Firms Bulk Up, Echoing Big Oil Mergers
by Patrick Barta and Robert Guy MatthewsWall Street Journal
December 18th, 2007
Mining are embarking on another round of deals that promises industry juggernauts with great influence over the cost of raw materials -- and, by extension, the price of consumer electronics, cars and new apartment blocks.

UK: The Biggest Global Warming Crime in History
by Cahal MilmoIndependent (UK)
December 13th, 2007
BP is accused of investing a large sum of money to extract oil from the Canadian wilderness using environmentally unsound methods.

US: A World Consumed by Guilt
by Eric WilsonNew York Times
December 13th, 2007
Buying green may not be so easy.

US: Group: Wal-Mart Blind to Illegal Logging
by Marcus KabelForbes.com
December 12th, 2007
A nonprofit group has found that Wal Mart's wood products use timber from a Russian region rife with illegal logging.

US: Wary of Protests, Exxon Plans Natural Gas Terminal in the Atlantic
by Jads MouawadNew York Times
December 12th, 2007
Exxon Mobil would like to build a $1 billion floating terminal for liquefied natural gas about 20 miles off the coast of New Jersey.

GLOBAL: Big Oil lets sun set on renewables
by Terry MacalisterGuardian (UK)
December 11th, 2007
Shell, the oil company that recently trumpeted its commitment to a low carbon future by signing a pre-Bali conference communique, has quietly sold off most of its solar business. Rival BP decided last week to invest in the world's dirtiest oil production in Canada's tar sands, indicating that Big Oil might be giving up its flirtation with renewables and going back to its roots.

CANADA: Gov't Urged to Rein in Mining Sector
by Am JohalIPS News
December 7th, 2007
Canadian mining companies continue to come under scrutiny from civil society organisations for international human rights violations and environmental damage that critics say the Canadian government has done little to check.

US: Shoshone Use Film, Courts to Fight Barrick Gold Mine on Sacred Land
by Lisa J. WolfEnviroment News Service
December 6th, 2007
"Our Land, Our Life," a 74 minute documentary directed by George and Beth Gage, details Carrie and Mary Dann's 30 year struggle to protect their traditional ways and ancestral lands from mining degradation in a battle that went to the U.S. Supreme Court and beyond to the United Nations with no relief as yet from the U.S. government.

SINGAPORE: Neste to build $814 mln Singapore biofuel plant
by Tarmo VirkiThe Guardian
November 30th, 2007
Finnish refiner Neste Oil is working to build the world's largest biodiesel plant amongst controversy over the environmental impact of palm oil plants.

US: Google launches search for energy solutions
by Bob KeefePalm Beach Post
November 28th, 2007
Google is going ga-ga over green energy.

INDONESIA: Police and border guard stop Greenpeace demonstration near Porvoo refinery
Helsingin Sanomat
November 26th, 2007
Greenpeace demonstrators and police came to a head over protests against a major palm oil producer in Indonesia.

CHINA: China Shows High Interest in African Oil
by Benoit FauconWall Street Journal
November 22nd, 2007
Royal Dutch Shell is considering selling interests in two Nigerian offshore oil blocks to China's Cnooc Ltd. as it restructures its business in the troubled region.

US: Border Fence Work Raises Environmental Concerns
by Randal C. ArchiboldNew York Times
November 21st, 2007
Environmental groups, elected officials and local Indian tribes criticize the Department of Homeland Security over environmental concerns related to fencing along the U.S.-Mexico border.

INDONESIA: Indonesia palm oil tanker dodges Greenpeace blockade
Reuters
November 17th, 2007
Greenpeace vowed on Saturday to keep up a blockade on a key palm oil port in Indonesia's Sumatra as part of protest against forest destruction, as a tanker it had been trying to block for three days managed to leave the port.

DRC: Six arrested in Congo radioactive dumping scandal
by Joe BavierReuters
November 10th, 2007
Congolese authorities arrested six people in connection with the dumping of tonnes of highly radioactive minerals into a river near the southeastern town of Likasi. A report said some 17 tons of the minerals confiscated were destined for Chinese firm Magma.

US: Toxins Threaten to Uproot Entire Town
by Mark WeisenmillerIPS News
November 5th, 2007
The mostly African American citizens of a small town in rural Florida suffer severely because of a beryllium leak at a Lockheed Martin-owned plant.

GERMANY: FSC's 'Green' Label for Wood Products Gets Growing Pains
by Tom Wright and Jim CarltonWall Street Journal
October 30th, 2007
The Forest Stewardship Council -- a widely recognized third-party labeling system to identify "green" wood and paper products -- has acknowledged that some companies using its label are destroying pristine forests and says it plans to overhaul its rules.

US: Little Green Lies
by Ben ElginBusiness 2.0
October 29th, 2007
The notion that making a company environmentally friendly can be not just cost-effective but profitable is questioned.

US: BP fined $373m by US government
BBC News
October 26th, 2007
Oil giant BP has been fined a total of $373m (£182m) by the US Department of Justice for environmental crimes and committing fraud.

US: Fight Against Coal Plants Draws Diverse Partners
by Susan MoranNY Times
October 20th, 2007
Western anti-coal coalitions of environmentalists and non-environmentalists are becoming more effective at dampening new efforts to build coal plants.

US: Companies go green: Greenquest or greenwash?
by Jill JamesFinancial Times
October 15th, 2007
Are companies going green to protect their reputations rather than being genuinely concerned for the environment?

US: US green groups urge Toyota U-turn
by John ReedFinancial Times
October 15th, 2007
Toyota is scrambling to protect its green reputation in the US, its largest market, where environmental groups are urging it to drop its opposition to a draft fuel economy bill.

RUSSIA: Siberian boom threatens traditions
by Tom EsslemontBBC News
October 8th, 2007
Russia is forging ahead with ambitious energy projects in eastern Siberia, but the indigenous Evenk people are complaining that their age-old way of life is in danger.

BURMA: Criticism of Total Operations Grows
by Michael DiebertIPS
October 4th, 2007
The Yadana natural gas pipeline runs through the heart of the debate on corporate responsibility as to how foreign businesses should operate in a country ruled by a military dictatorship accused of widespread human rights abuses and violent suppression of dissent within its borders.

CONGO: World Bank accused of razing Congo forests
by John VidalThe Guardian (UK)
October 4th, 2007
The World Bank encouraged foreign companies to destructively log the world's second largest forest, endangering the lives of thousands of Congolese Pygmies, according to a report on an internal investigation by senior bank staff and outside experts.

FRANCE: Total: No Capital Expenditures in Myanmar
Associated Press
September 27th, 2007
Total SA, reacting Thursday to comments by French President Sarkozy urging the oil and gas giant to refrain from new investment in Myanmar, said it had not made any capital expenditure there since 1998. The military junta that rules Myanmar this week escalated its efforts to repress pro-democracy demonstrations led by thousands of Buddhist monks.

US: Green group attacks oil giant on climate research
by Alison BenjaminGuardian Unlimited
September 26th, 2007
An environmental group today took aim at ExxonMobil with the launch of an online video attacking the oil giant's green credentials.

US: Wal-Mart maps out grand plan to go greener
by Fiona Harvey and Jonathan BirchallFinancial Times
September 24th, 2007
Wal-Mart will set out how it will cut costs by measuring and reducing greenhouse gas emissions throughout its supply chain Monday.

CHILE: Pascua Lama payoff disputed by Chile locals
by Trey PollardSantiago Times/El Mercurio
September 11th, 2007
Huasco Valley property owners who live below the Pascua Lama gold mine and administer US$3 million yearly in “hush” money given them by mine owner Barrick Gold charged this weekend that their predecessors used Barrick’s money for personal gain.

INDONESIA: Mr. Clean: Accused of Poisoning Indonesian Villagers, Rick Ness Tries to Prove His Innocence
by David CaseMother Jones magazine
September 10th, 2007
Ever since Rick Ness was accused of contaminating pristine Indonesian water, he's been spending a million a month to convince the world that he's innocent. And once you meet him, you'll want to believe him.

CHINA: Ravaged Rivers
by Jane SpencerWall Street Journal
August 22nd, 2007
China Pays Steep Price As Textile Exports Boom Suppliers to U.S. Stores Accused of Dumping Dyes To Slash Their Costs

US: Lead found in more baby bibs? Bibs sold in Toys R Us, Babies R Us questioned
by Anna Marie KukecDaily Herald
August 16th, 2007
A California consumer group said Wednesday it has filed a legal action against Toys R Us and Babies R Us for selling vinyl baby bibs said to contain high levels of lead.

INDIA: Indian Activists' Rising Clout
by Jackie RangeWall Street Journal
August 16th, 2007
India's Supreme Court is poised to decide whether a British company has the right to mine in a sacred tribal forest, a case that underlines the complexity of undertaking large-scale industrial projects here. The case's hearing by the court reflects the growing clout of activist groups in India.

UK: Raft of flaws found in popular carbon offsetting schemes
by Martin HickmanThe Independent (UK)
August 13th, 2007
A television documentary has uncovered flaws in a series of carbon offsetting schemes intended to make good the global warming gases emitted by flights and other polluting activities.

WORLD: We must count the true cost of cheap China
by Richard McGregorFinancial Times
August 2nd, 2007
In the wake of the multiple scandals over tainted Chinese food and drug exports in recent months, Chinese goods now have an indelible image of being not just cheap, but life-threatening as well. But the fact that wrongly labelled foods, liquor and pharmaceuticals have routinely sickened and even killed people en masse in China has been largely overlooked.

US: Mattel Recalls One Million Toys
by Louise Story New York Times
August 2nd, 2007
Mattel, the maker of Barbie dolls and Hot Wheels cars, is recalling nearly one million toys in the United States today because the products’ surfaces are covered in lead paint. According to Mattel, all the toys were made by a contract manufacturer in China.

COLOMBIA: Suing Multinationals Over Murder
by Ken StierTIME Magazine
August 1st, 2007
Organized labor often complains of its treatment at the hands of corporate America, but its accusations pale in comparison to those made recently by the widows of Colombian mine workers in an Alabama courtroom. During a two-week trial, a Birmingham jury weighed charges that the local Drummond Coal Company bore responsibility for the murders of three union leaders who represented workers at its Colombian mine - the world's largest open pit mine.

US: Can Ford Clean Up After Itself?
by Ron StodghillThe New York Times
July 29th, 2007
Follow-up studies on a cleanup effort at the site of a former Ford car factory have shown that there is still a great deal of toxins left in the soil.

US: Navajos and Environmentalists Split on Power Plant
by Felicity BarringerThe New York Times
July 27th, 2007
A plan to build a new, large coal-fired power plant has proved divisive in the Navajo community in Nevada, with some arguing that it will bring the community millions, while others saying it is a lethal "energy monster" and harbinger of environmental destruction.

US: Savings and Issues in Candidates’ Use of Private Jets
by Michael Cooper and Leslie WayneThe New York Times
July 26th, 2007
Political fortunes and high costs have forced some presidential candidates to switch from using chartered private jets to those of corporations, including John McCain, who had previously sponsored a bill limiting use of corporate jets by candidates.

COLOMBIA: Drummond Union: Govt Muffles Key Witness
by Frank BajakForbes.com
July 24th, 2007
The union activists suing U.S. coal company Drummond Co. Inc. in Alabama in the 2001 murders of three labor leaders say deliberate foot-dragging by Colombian authorities is preventing the jury from hearing their star witness. Concerned by the delay, 12 Democrats in the U.S. Congress wrote Colombia's vice president last week asking him to intercede.

EUROPE: A Genetically Modified Potato, Not for Eating, Is Stirring Some Opposition in Europe
by Elisabeth RosenthalThe New York Times
July 24th, 2007
Amflora potatoes, likely to become the first genetically modified crop in the last decade to be approved for growth in Europe, have become the unlikely lightning rod in the angry debate over such products on the Continent.

UGANDA: African forest under threat from sugar cane plantation
by Daniel HowdenThe Independent (UK)
July 10th, 2007
Conservationists in Uganda are fighting a last-ditch battle to stop the destruction of a forest reserve by a sugar corporation friendly with the government.

CHILE: Gold rush threatens glacier
by Lucia Newman Al Jazeera
July 8th, 2007
A new gold rush is under way as mining companies seek to supply the ever-increasing demand for the precious metal from emerging economies such as India, and with reserves dwindling all over the world they are going to extraordinary lengths to extract it.

UN: Global Compact with Business 'Lacks Teeth' - NGOs
by Gustavo CapdevilaInter Press News Service (IPS)
July 6th, 2007
The U.N.'s Global Compact with international big business "at the moment is so voluntary that it really is a happy-go-lucky club," says Ramesh Singh, chief executive of ActionAid, a non-governmental organisation. The controversy has come to a boiling point because of the Global Compact Leaders' Summit being held in Geneva on Thursday and Friday, at which over 1,000 representatives of multinational companies are taking part, in addition to well-known civil society figures like Irene Khan, the secretary general of AI; Mary Robinson, president of the Ethical Globalisation Initiative; Guy Ryder, general secretary of the International Trade Union Confederation; and Jeremy Hobbs, executive director of Oxfam International.

NETHERLANDS: Shell ordered to withdraw 'misleading' Dutch ad that made environmental claims
by James KanterThe International Herald Tribune
July 5th, 2007
Royal Dutch Shell has been ordered to withdraw an advertisement in the Netherlands that sought to portray the oil giant as environmentally friendly, and British authorities said Thursday they had opened a formal investigation in the case.

INDONESIA: Palm Oil Producer Unethical, Groups Say
by Toby SterlingThe Associated Press
July 3rd, 2007
A Singapore-based company was involved in slashing and burning Indonesian forests to make way for palm oil plantations that feed the growing market for biofuels, environmental and activist groups claimed Tuesday. The company emphatically denied the allegations.

US: Buying Into the Green Movement
by Alex WilliamsThe New York Times
July 1st, 2007
Consumers have embraced living green, and for the most part the mainstream green movement has embraced green consumerism. But even at this moment of high visibility and impact for environmental activists, a splinter wing of the movement has begun to critique what it sometimes calls “light greens.”

US: States Target Big-Box Stores; Maine Is First to Require That Wal-Mart, Rivals Undergo Impact Studies
by Kris HudsonThe Wall Street Journal
June 29th, 2007
Maine Gov. John Baldacci last week signed into law a measure requiring developers of retail stores exceeding 75,000 square feet to conduct studies gauging the project's impact on municipal services, the environment and local businesses. Similar measures have been passed in other states.

US: At Home Depot, How Green Is That Chainsaw?
by Cliffard KrausNew York Times
June 25th, 2007
As companies rush to carry "environmentally friendly" products, Home Depot encourages suppliers to pitch to have their products included in its new Eco Options marketing campaign. Critics argue that the green label is overused and overmarketed.

US: On the Rio Grande, Anger Swells Over Plans for Fence; Residents, Ecologists United in Opposition
by Sylvia MorenoThe Washington Post
June 22nd, 2007
Environmentalistsa and land-owners livng along the US-Mexico border express anger at the US government's plan to build 700 miles of fence along the US-Mexico border, claiming that the fence will threaten both local farming and a valuable nature preserve and wildlife corridor.

INDONESIA: Mud Volcano Sullies Top Investment Firms
by Emad MekayInter Press News Service (IPS)
June 21st, 2007
Environmental campaigners are urging several heavyweight investment firms, including Credit Suisse, Barclays, Fortis Group and Merrill Lynch, to shoulder some responsibility for a catastrophic mud volcano on the Indonesian island of Java that resulted from a gas project the firms helped fund.

COLUMBIA: Studies Find DNA Damage from Anti-Coca Herbicide
by Stephen LeahyInter Press Service News Agency
June 16th, 2007
U.S.-funded aerial spraying of coca plantations in Colombia near the Ecuador border has severely damaged the DNA of local residents, a new study has found.

CAMBODIA:Denuded by Corruption, Plunder, Impunity
by Marwaan Macan-Markar Inter Press Service News Agency
June 6th, 2007
The Cambodian government turns its ire on non-governmental organisations that are critical of Cambodia's environmental policies and the copious relationships between logging companies and Cambodia's political elite and military.

BRUSSELS:Europe Moves to Make Big Polluters Pay for Emissions
by Stephen CastleThe New York Times
June 4th, 2007
Europe moves towards making significant changes to its emissions-trading system that could force large polluters to pay for most, if not all, permits to produce climate-changing gases.

GERMANY:German Police and Protesters Battle Near Site of G-8 Meeting
by Reutershttp://www.nytimes.com/2007/06/03/world/europe/03germany.html?_r=1&n=Top%2fReference%2fTimes%20Topics%2fOrganizations%2fG%2fGroup%20of%20Eight&oref=slogin
June 3rd, 2007
German police clashed with hundreds of protesters in the port of Rostock on Saturday following a much larger peaceful demonstration against the Group of 8 summit meeting next week in a nearby Baltic resort.

CHILE: Chile Must Pay US$5.4 Million to Aricans Living Amid Toxic Waste
by Mike HagerThe Santiago Times
June 1st, 2007
In a landmark case, Chile’s Supreme Court ruled this week that the state must compensate 356 residents of two slums in the northern mining city of Arica for health problems brought on by years of exposure to open deposits of toxic waste. Promel, the Swedish company responsible for the importation of the toxic materials, cannot compensate the plaintiffs because the company no longer exists.

INDONESIA: Blood boils as mud volcano swallows homes
Sydney Morning Herald
May 26th, 2007
One year ago this Tuesday, a gas-exploration well part-owned by the Australian mining giant Santos blew, sending a geyser of mud and toxic gas into the air. Nearby villages and factories were flooded, then a big highway and railway were covered, and later East Java's main gas pipeline ruptured.

US: Governor vetoes liquefied gas proposal
by Marc LifsherLos Angeles Times
May 19th, 2007
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Friday vetoed a proposal to build a terminal for importing liquefied natural gas 20 miles off the coast of Malibu, but he kept the door open for future LNG projects if they are environmentally sensitive.

SUDAN: China accused of supporting Sudan rights abuse
Agence France Presse
May 18th, 2007
A leading opponent of a Chinese-financed dam in Sudan accused Beijing on Friday of fueling widespread human rights abuses, as Khartoum moved to relocate 70,000 villagers to make way for the project.

US: Murdoch: I'm proud to be green
by Geoffrey LeanThe Independent (U.K.)
May 13th, 2007
News Corp boss orders his entire empire to convert and become a worldwide enthusiast for the environment

CYPRUS: US company’s toxic waste under scrutiny in Cyprus
Today's Zaman
May 10th, 2007
US mining company Cyprus Mines Corporation dumped 10 million tons of toxic waste on the island during its 60-year-long operations on Cyprus.

CANADA: Barrick Boss Gets Served
by Amy ChungNow (Toronto)
May 10th, 2007
Protest Barrick, a network of aboriginal communities from Australia, the U.S., Latin America and Asia, converged on Barrick Gold Corporation's shareholder meeting at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre May 2 to serve the company an eviction notice from First Nation land.

INDONESIA: Jakarta launches appeal in case against Newmont Mining Corp
Reuters
May 8th, 2007
Indonesian prosecutors have launched the first stage of an appeal after Newmont Mining Corp’s Indonesian unit was cleared in a high-profile pollution case two weeks ago, a court official said yesterday.

PHILIPPINES: Island residents face lost livelihoods, damaged environment
by GLENIS BALANGUEABS-CBN News (IBON features)
April 22nd, 2007
For the nearly 50,000 residents of Rapu-Rapu, Albay and the adjoining municipality of Prieto Diaz, Sorsogon, fishing has been the primary livelihood for generations.

DRC: Vast forests with trees each worth £4,000 sold for a few bags of sugar
by John VidalGuardian Unlimited
April 11th, 2007
· Congo village chiefs not told value of concessions · World Bank blamed over deals causing 'catastrophe'

CANADA: UN Body Holds Canada Responsible for Corporations’ Actions Abroad
by Mark CherringtonCultural Survival
April 10th, 2007
In a groundbreaking decision, the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD) has told Canada that it must rein in Canadian corporations operating on Indian land in the United States.

AUSTRALIA: Arrests made after Barrick mine protest turns ugly
by Jano GibsonSydney Morning Herald
April 9th, 2007
Eighteen anti-gold mine activists have been charged following a protest in central NSW, which concluded with a man allegedly ransacking the protesters' campsite while armed with a knife.

RUSSIA: Toxic truth of secretive Siberian city
BBC News
April 5th, 2007
A BBC team has entered a remote region of Russia normally closed to foreigners that produces almost half the world's supply of palladium - a precious metal vital for making catalytic converters. But, as the BBC's Richard Galpin reports, it is accused of being the world's largest producer of acid rain.

US: Gore needs a greener Apple
by Marc Gunther CNN Money
April 3rd, 2007
Environmental groups tell Al Gore to push the computer maker to improve its practices and limit its impact on the environment.

CHILE: Water clash at Chile copper mine
by Jane ChambersBBC News
March 26th, 2007
A dispute over water rights has hit one of Chile's largest copper mines, Los Pelambres.

US: World Bank raps Exxon over Chad
by Lesley WroughtonReuters
March 22nd, 2007
The World Bank has told an Exxon Mobil-led consortium to take corrective action to fully compensate farmers in southern Chad who lost land and their livelihoods as the U.S. company expands its search for oil in the Doba basin.

GUATEMALA: Mining misery
by Maria AmuchasteguiThis Magazine
March 21st, 2007
Guatemala is one of many countries that has attracted the investment of Canadian mining companies—but at what cost to its people?

PERU: Human Rights Commission May Examine Violations at La Oroya, Peru
Earthjustice Legal Fund and CIEL
March 21st, 2007
Public health and environmental organizations from throughout the Western Hemisphere today announced the filing of a petition with the human rights division of the Organization of American States in Washington, D.C. The petition accuses the Peruvian government of doing little to halt contamination from a metallurgical complex that is impacting the lives and health of the citizens of La Oroya, Peru.

ARGENTINA: Famatina Says NO to Barrick Gold
by David ModersbachMines and Communities
March 20th, 2007
In the Argentine province of La Rioja, an astonishing series of events have lead to the ouster of a corrupt pro-mining provincial governor and the apparent withdrawal of gold mining giant Barrick Gold from operations on the Famatina range. Who was responsible for these events? A small group of dedicated neighbors who are fighting tooth and nail to save their mountain range from open-pit mining exploitation.

US: Global-warming deniers feeling the heat
by Diane CarmanDenver Post
March 20th, 2007
The drumbeat of skepticism over global warming has been oddly muted in the weeks since the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released its summary report in February.

US: Coeur d'Alene Mines Loses Clean Water Act Court Case
Environment News Service
March 16th, 2007
The federal Clean Water Act cannot be used to destroy an Alaskan lake, a federal appeals court ruled today, in a decision that may set precedent about how the act is interpreted nationwide.

US: Chevron Faces More Scrutiny in Ecuador over Pollution
by Emad Mekay IPS News
March 15th, 2007
Leaders of indigenous communities in Ecuador are pressing their government to investigate senior executives from U.S. oil giant Chevron for an alleged environmental fraud scheme in the mid-1990s related to a long-running six-billion dollar class action suit in the South American nation.

INDIA: Amnesty International Public Statement: Deaths in West Bengal due to police firing during protests against new industrial project
Amnesty International
March 15th, 2007
Amnesty International is deeply concerned at reports of the use of excessive and unnecessary force by police in West Bengal (Eastern India) against farmers protesting proposed displacement by the state government for a new industrial project, which has resulted in deaths of at least 14 persons and injuries.

US: Exxon unveils 20 projects for next three years
by Sheila McNultyFinancial Times
March 7th, 2007
ExxonMobil, the world's biggest listed oil company, said on Wednesday the company will start more than 20 new global projects in the next three years that should add 1m oil equivalent barrels per day to Exxon's base volumes.

US: INTERVIEW-BP faulty in Alaska's biggest oil spill -gov't
by Robert CampbellReuters
March 6th, 2007
Oil major BP's failure to maintain pipelines properly at its giant Prudhoe Bay field was a major factor behind Alaska's worst-ever onshore crude spill last year, a senior federal official said.

US: BP/UC Deal Raises Concerns
by Richard BrennemanBerkeley Daily Planet
March 2nd, 2007
The proposed agreement between one of the world’s largest oil companies, BP (formerly British Petroleum) and UC Berkeley, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of Illinois has ignited a firestorm that promises to burn long and hot.

US: Lockheed: Health care data off-limits
by Donna WrightBradenton Herald
March 1st, 2007
Spokeswoman says she misunderstood company's policy on free medical plan

US: Earthjustice, Alaska Natives protest drilling plans in Beaufort Sea
by Terry WincklerEarthjustice Legal Fund and CIEL
March 1st, 2007
Federal agency allowed drilling without adequate assessment of impacts on marine mammals

HONDURAS: Protests Mount Against Mining Giant
by Stephen LeahyMines & Communities
February 24th, 2007
Dangerous levels of lead and arsenic have been found in the blood of Honduran villagers living downstream from a controversial gold and silver mine owned by Canada's Goldcorp Inc., the world's third largest gold mining firm.

BELGIUM: Climate change scepticism still exists in Brussels
by Andrew RettmanEU Observer
February 20th, 2007
The human cause of climate change is an established fact in the scientific community. But some giant corporations such as Exxon Mobil continue to fund NGOs that sow doubt on the subject, with some MEPs tempted by the sceptical line.

US: TXU, Exxon Mobil Among 10 'Climate Watch' Companies Targeted by Investors
Ceres
February 13th, 2007
US Companies Face Record Number of Global Warming Resolutions

CONGO: All that glitters...
by Jean-Roger KasekiGuardian (UK)
February 13th, 2007
Decades of gold mining should have given Congo a ticket to prosperity. Instead, it is trapped in a cycle of violence and poverty.

FRANCE: Oil giant 'knew tanker was a risk before disaster'
by John LichfieldThe Independent
February 13th, 2007
The French oil company Total and 14 other defendants were accused yesterday of criminal responsibility for one of Europe's most calamitous oil spills, the wreck of the Erika.

NIGERIA: Oil Spill Displaces 10 Ijaw Communities
by Emma ArubiVanguard (Lagos)
February 13th, 2007
CHEVRON'S Abiteye flow station oil spill of over 1,500 barrels of crude has rendered over 10 Ijaw communities and 500 hundred persons homeless in Gbaramatu kingdom in Warri South West local government area of Delta State.

UK: BP's BTC pipeline needs extra monitoring-US agency
February 12th, 2007
Extra monitoring is needed on BP PLC's (BP) Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan pipeline, particularly on cracks and leakages in its coating, the U.S. Overseas Private Investment Corporation, or OPIC, said in a report.

UK: Monsanto helped to create one of the most contaminated sites in Britain
by John VidalThe Guardian (UK)
February 12th, 2007
Previously unseen Environment Agency documents from 2005 show that almost 30 years after being filled, Brofiscin is one of the most contaminated places in Britain. According to engineering company WS Atkins, in a report prepared for the agency and the local authority in 2005 but never made public, the site contains at least 67 toxic chemicals. Seven PCBs have been identified, along with vinyl chlorides and naphthalene.

FRANCE: Total on trial over 1999 French oil disaster
by James MackenzieReuters
February 12th, 2007
A trial into one of France's worst environmental disasters opens on Monday with oil giant Total facing charges over toxic fuel spills that washed ashore following the sinking of the tanker Erika in 1999.

PHILIPPINES: Protesters regroup as mine due to reopen
Manila Times
February 11th, 2007
Environmentalists and church leaders in Bicol will launch yet another protest—this time for three days—against the government for allowing Lafayette Philippines Inc. to resume its operation.

JAMAICA: Dust, stench and claim of impotence: Pollution killing us, say communities near bauxite plants - Firms insist waste not toxic
by Karyl WalkerJamaica Observer
February 11th, 2007
The approximately US$400 million earned by the bauxite sector last year means nothing to Sandra McLean and other residents of districts surrounding the Alumina Partners of Jamaica (Alpart) refinery in Nain, St Elizabeth.

US: New York Moves Toward Suit Over a 50-Year-Old Oil Spill
by Nicholas ConfessoreThe New York Times
February 8th, 2007
New York State moved to sue Exxon Mobil and four other companies on Thursday to force them to clean up a half-century-old spill of millions of gallons of oil lying under the Greenpoint neighborhood in Brooklyn and to repair environmental damage inflicted on nearby Newtown Creek.

PERU: UN Mission Probes Private Security Groups
by Ángel PáezInter Press News Service (IPS)
February 7th, 2007
A priest who provides support for Peruvian farmers in their conflict with a transnational gold mining corporation complained to a United Nations mission that he was under surveillance by a private security company.

ICELAND: Smokestacks in a White Wilderness Divide Iceland in a Development Debate
by Sarah LyallNew York Times
February 4th, 2007
The $3 billion Karahnjukar Hydropower Project in Iceland, a sprawling enterprise to harness the rivers for electricity that will be used for a single purpose: to fuel a new aluminum smelter owned by Alcoa, the world's largest aluminum company, has been the focus of the angriest and most divisive battle in recent Icelandic history.

US: Device Breaks Up in Pipeline, and Search Is On for Lost Piece
by Felicity BarringerThe New York Times
February 3rd, 2007
A device designed to clean waxy buildup from the walls of the 800-mile Alaska pipeline broke apart inside the pipeline in December, raising the possibility that any remaining shards of machinery might damage sensitive valves, an executive of Alyeska, the company that runs the pipeline, confirmed Thursday.

UK: Campaigners urge Shell to put profits into clean-up
by Terry MacalisterGuardian (UK)
January 31st, 2007
Record annual profits to be announced by Shell tomorrow should be used towards paying off a bill estimated at more than $20bn (£10bn) for the damage caused by its oil activities to local communities and the wider environment, according to an alliance of human rights and green groups including Friends of the Earth (FoE).

US: Green like money: Activists counter PG&E's greenwashing
by Amanda WitherellSF Bay Guardian
January 31st, 2007
During a so-called green fair at the LGBT center in San Francisco, Pacific Gas and Electric (PG & E) unveiled a $170,000 gift of solar panels for the roof of the building. But activists complain that this recent move is a greenwashing tactic, to make this corporation, which owns a mere 0 percent solar and 2 percent wind, appear green when it is in fact not.

CAMEROON: Oil leak shows weaknesses in World Bank pipeline, NGOs warn
IRIN News
January 26th, 2007
Fishermen in the southern coastal town of Kribi are warily casting their nets after a leak in the massive Chad-Cameroon pipeline last week.

INDONESIA: Indonesia Newmont boss says no complaints on mining
Reuters
January 23rd, 2007
The head of the Indonesian unit of Newmont Mining Corp. told a court on Tuesday that authorities had never told the firm its mining activities might be breaking environmental or mining laws.

BRAZIL: Tailings dam failure in Brazil
Water Power Magazine
January 22nd, 2007
Brazil's state government of Minas Gerais has shut down the Mineracao Rio Pomba bauxite mine after the failure of a tailings dam.

PAPUA NEW GUINEA: Ok Tedi villagers sue for $5bn damages
The Australian
January 19th, 2007
MINING giant BHP Billiton and the operators of the Ok Tedi copper mine in Papua New Guinea are being sued for civil damages exceeding $US4 billion ($5.08 billion) by villagers on the Ok Tedi River.

US: ARCO Ordered to Investigate Radioactivity at Anaconda Mine
Environmental News Service
January 17th, 2007
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Friday ordered to the Atlantic Richfield Company, ARCO, to begin an investigation to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the Anaconda Copper Mine in Yerington, Nevada.

CANADA: Mine could impact everything from fish to grizzlies
by HEIDI DESCHHungry Horse News
January 17th, 2007
Environmental experts continue to warn against the creation of a huge coal mine just north of the border.

USA: Big Banks are finding it is not easy being green.
by Joseph A. Giannone and Lisa LeeReuters
January 11th, 2007
Financial giants such as Merrill Lynch and Citigroup among others are under fire from environmental groups and some investors who complain they still fund power plants and other polluting projects despite adopting the Earth-friendly Equator Principles with much fanfare in 2003.

WORLD: GM crops slow to win over the world
by Stephen LeahyMail & Guardian Online
January 10th, 2007
Widespread use of GM crops remains limited worldwide, even as growing weed and pest issues are forcing farmers to use ever greater amounts of pesticides.

UK: UK class action starts over toxic waste dumped in Africa
by John VidalGuardian (UK)
January 8th, 2007
Lawyers will today begin preparing the ground for one of the largest class actions heard in the UK over 400 tonnes of allegedly highly toxic waste dumped in the Ivory Coast from a cargo ship chartered by a London-based company.

EU: Ryanair hits back in 'green' row
BBC
January 5th, 2007
Ryanair boss Michael O'Leary has hit back at criticism from the climate change minister, saying his airline was "the greenest in Europe".

US: Exxon Mobil's biggest oil spill is in Brooklyn, not Alaska
by Matthew LeisingBloomberg
January 4th, 2007
The biggest oil spill Exxon Mobil has to answer for is not the cargo that gushed from the Exxon Valdez tanker into Alaska's Prince William Sound. It is the fuel that soaked into the ground beneath a working class section of Brooklyn, New York.

TRINIDAD: Trinidad's Smelter Switcheroo
by Peter RichardsInter Press Service
January 4th, 2007
After years of community protests, including a semi-permanent tent camp, the Trinidad and Tobago government abruptly announced that it was backing away from plans to construct aluminium smelter plants in the southwest peninsula villages of Cedros and Chatham.

US: ExxonMobil Accused of Disinformation on Warming
by Jim LobeInter Press Service
January 3rd, 2007
Like the tobacco industry that for decades denied a link between smoking and lung cancer, ExxonMobil has waged a "sophisticated and successful disinformation campaign" to mislead the public about global warming, according to a major new report by the U.S.-based Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS).

ROMANIA: Fighting Over Gold in the Land of Dracula
Wilmington Star
January 3rd, 2007
A small-time Romanian farmer counts powerful names among his backers in a land battle with a Canadian gold mining company.

CHILE: Chile's divisive mountain of gold
by Luisa BaldiniBBC News
January 2nd, 2007
Tons of gold-bearing ore need to be excavated to produce a single ounce of bullion. Once the rock has been pulverised, cyanide is used in a leaching process to extract gold and silver.

INDIA: Oil Industry Blamed for Polluting India's Assam
Reuters
December 29th, 2006
Oil companies in India's northeastern state of Assam are responsible for polluting rivers and destroying rainforests and have been told to clean up their act or face closure, authorities said on Thursday.

US: Court halves Exxon spill damages
BBC News Online
December 22nd, 2006
A US court has almost halved the damages oil giant Exxon Mobil must pay for a 1989 oil spill off Alaska.

PERU: Company Offers Bandaid Solutions to a Polluted Town
by Milagros SalazarInter Press News Service (IPS)
December 14th, 2006
In this mining town in Peru's Andean highlands, there is a shelter, but not for the victims of a war. The only bombardment escaped by the young children taken there every day comes from toxic emissions that have already done plenty of damage.

US: Shareholders to Dow: Deal with Mass Poisoning Fallout
by Aaron GlantzOne World US
December 9th, 2006
Owners of more than $278 million in shares of Dow Chemical field a shareholder resolution this week demanding the company address outstanding issues from a 1984 explosion at a pesticide plant in India.

US: Md. coal mining's toxic legacy
by Tom PeltonBaltimore Sun
December 8th, 2006
In the woods at the fringe of this Western Maryland town, a mountain of waste 50 feet high is slouching into a creek that's tinted an eerie orange. The "gob pile" is refuse from a long-abandoned coal mine. And the stream into which it's eroding, Winebrenner Run, is devoid of life - one of the state's worst cases of sulfuric acid pollution from mines.

EU: Exxon spends millions to cast doubt on warming
by Andrew Buncombe and Stephen CastleThe Independent (UK)
December 7th, 2006
The world's largest energy company is still spending hundreds of thousands of dollars to fund European organisations that seek to cast doubt on the scientific consensus on global warming and undermine support for legislation to curb emission of greenhouse gases.

US: Corporation wants to drill on Mt. Taylor
by Zsombor PeterThe Gallup Independent
December 7th, 2006
After drilling six exploratory holes by Mt. Taylor earlier this year in search of uranium, the Western Energy Development Corporation is asking for state and federal permission to drill 47 more.

CHILE: Stepped-Up Battle Against Andean Gold Mine
by Daniela EstradaInter Press Service (IPS)
December 6th, 2006
Canadian mining giant Barrick Gold Corp. is facing a stepped-up international campaign against its Pascua Lama gold mine project on the border between Chile and Argentina, high up in the Andes Mountains.

US: Apple gets low score in Greenpeace e-waste report
by Jim DalrympleMacworld
December 6th, 2006
Environmental group Greenpeace on Wednesday issued the first quarterly update on the technology industry’s performance on environmental issues. While the group recognized many companies are improving Apple does not appear to be among them — Apple remains in last place.

GHANA: Ghana's gold inflicts heavy price
by James HaselipPeople and the Planet
December 6th, 2006
Gold mining is Ghana�s most valuable export industry: in 2005, US$1.4 billion worth of gold was shipped from the country, dwarfing the value of its other major foreign currency earners - timber and cocoa. However, very little of the gold revenues stay in the country while damage to the physical environment by both large and small-scale mining is inflicting an incalculable cost to the economy with vast tracts of farming land permanently ruined, forests destroyed and water resources diverted and polluted.

US: Polluting Ohio HazWaste Incinerator Fined $750,000
Environment News Service
December 5th, 2006
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Department of Justice have reached an agreement with Von Roll America Inc. on alleged clean air and hazardous waste violations at the company's commercial hazardous waste incinerator in East Liverpool, Ohio.

INDONESIA: UPDATE 1-NYC comptroller wants review of miner Freeport
Reuters
December 5th, 2006
New York City Comptroller William Thompson, who oversees the city's pension funds, on Tuesday called for a review of Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold Inc.'s environmental policies and practices in Indonesia.

PERU: Half the Peruvian Amazon Leased for Petroleum Development
Envinroment News Service
December 4th, 2006
Conservation groups based in Washington warned today that the Peruvian government is signing so many contracts with multinational oil companies that half the rainforest of the Peruvian Amazon is now covered with oil leases.

US: Anti-, pro-Pebble forces square off
by ELIZABETH BLUEMINKAnchorage Daily News
December 3rd, 2006
The state Board of Fisheries now is squarely in the middle of the noisy battle being waged over Southwest Alaska's large and controversial Pebble copper and gold prospect.

PHILIPPINES: Lafayette's Rapu Rapu project damaged
The Age (AUST)
December 1st, 2006
Lafayette Mining Ltd's troubled Rapu Rapu polymetallic project in the Philippines has suffered a further setback with a second typhoon causing damage to the operation.

US: BLIGHTED HOMELAND: Mining firms again eyeing Navajo land
by Judy PasternakThe Los Angeles Times
November 22nd, 2006
Decades after the Cold War uranium boom ended, leaving a trail of poisonous waste across the Navajo Nation, the mining industry is back, seeking to tap the region's vast uranium deposits once again.

MALAWI: Bingu misled on uranium mining—civil society
by Juliet ChimwagaThe Nation (Malawi)
November 21st, 2006
Civil society organisations accused government Monday of misleading President Bingu wa Mutharika and the nation in its dealings with Paladin Africa Limited, saying the latter are not coming out clearly on the negative impact the multi-billion kwacha uranium mining project at Kayelekera in Karonga will have on people’s lives.

US: Uranium mining could contaminate Goliad aquifer
by Joe CongerKENS 5 Eyewitness News
November 17th, 2006
Just a pound of uranium brings top dollar on the market and could help to wean the United States off its foreign oil dependence. However, opponents say it could threaten the environment around San Antonio.

US: Dueling polls oppose, support Pebble Mine project
by Hal SpenceMorris News Service
November 15th, 2006
Two public opinion polls commissioned by an environmental group opposed to the Pebble Mine project are being touted as proof that Bristol Bay Region residents and voters statewide believe, by and large, that open-pit mining is not worth the risk.

PERU: Achuar win oil victory in Peru
by Lisa Garrigues Indian Country Today
November 6th, 2006
On Oct. 24, after a 14-day occupation, representatives of the Federation of Native Communities of the Corrientes Rio (FECONACO), which includes the Quichua and Urarinas people, reached an agreement with PlusPetrol and the Peruvian government. The agreement gave them 98 percent of their demands.

NIGERIA: Niger Delta bears brunt after 50 years of oil spills
by Jonathan BrownThe Independent (UK)
October 26th, 2006
Up to 1.5 million tons of oil, 50 times the pollution unleashed in the Exxon Valdez tanker disaster, has been spilt in the ecologically precious Niger Delta over the past 50 years, it was revealed yesterday.

NIGERIA: Attack on Nigeria oil facilities
BBC News
October 25th, 2006
A group of protesters have invaded three Shell oil stations in the Niger Delta, forcing the facilities to be shut down, the company said.

JAMAICA: Bauxite Mine Fight Looms in Jamaica's Cockpit Country
Environment News Service
October 24th, 2006
Drilling for bauxite samples in Jamaica's Cockpit Country is threatening the plants and animals that live in the region's moist tropical limestone forest, said conservationists today. Bauxite is the raw material for aluminum.

PHILIPPINES: Once-idyllic island center of debate on mining
by Cyrain CabuenasInquirer (PHIL)
October 19th, 2006
For many years, Manicani has served as a haven for people who wanted to commune with nature or check out World War II artifacts. These days, Siman has no glowing account of Manicani. "The island's balding mountains and depleted marine resources no longer hold any promise," he said.

GHANA: Dispute Over Newmont's Proposed Gold Mine At Akyem
by Mike AnanePublic Agenda (Accra)
October 16th, 2006
Plans by Denver-based multinational, Newmont mining Corporation to construct an open pit gold mine in the Ajenjua Bepo Forest Reserve located at New Abirem in the Birim North District of Ghana's Eastern Region are mired in controversy.

US: Unwanted Imports: Goods deemed toxic elsewhere shipped to U.S.
Associated Press
October 15th, 2006
Destined for American kitchens, planks of birch and poplar plywood are stacked to the ceiling of a cavernous port warehouse. The wood, which arrived in California via a cargo ship, carries two labels: One proclaims "Made in China," while the other warns that it contains formaldehyde, a cancer-causing chemical.

US: U.S. coal plant boom poses big environmental, economic questions
Associated Press
October 15th, 2006
A building boom that would add scores of new coal-fired power plants to the nation's power grid is creating a new dilemma for politicians, environmentalists and utility companies across the United States.

US: Watchdog Group Blasts Ford for Ethanol Loophole
Environment News Service
October 13th, 2006
The Ford Motor Company is misleading the public and the government about several of its vehicles that claim to operate on ethanol, according to letters sent to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) by the watchdog group Public Citizen.

US: New York Sues Coal-Fired Power Plant
Environment News Service
October 13th, 2006

US: Honeywell Agrees to $451 Million Lake Cleanup
Environment News Service
October 13th, 2006
Aerospace giant Honeywell Inc. has agreed to spend $451 million to clean up contaminated sediments in Onondaga Lake, one of the most polluted lakes in the United States. The lake, a sacred site to Native America tribes, is heavily contaminated with an array of toxic metals and chemicals and is one of only three lakes listed as a federal Superfund site.

US: Copper Plant Illegally Burned Hazardous Waste, E.P.A. Says
by Ralph BlumenthalThe New York Times
October 11th, 2006
A bankrupt copper giant facing billions of dollars in pollution claims across the nation pretended for years to recycle metals while illegally burning hazardous waste in a notorious El Paso smelter, according to a newly released Environmental Protection Agency document.

INDIA: 80,000 coal belt families face evacuation
Statesman News Service
October 10th, 2006
As many as 80,000 families living near the Jharia mine in Dhanbad coal belt face relocation. Officials say the coalfield area is, in effect, sitting on a “giant fireball deep inside the earth,” after they discovered at least six underground leaks of toxic fumes. Experts fear massive underground explosions followed by subsidence occuring at any moment.

US: Oil Companies Settle Fuel Violations for $1.5 Million
Environment News Service
October 6th, 2006
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has reached a $1.5 million settlement with BP and Shell for alleged violations of the motor vehicle fuels provisions of the federal Clean Air Act.

INDONESIA: New Indonesia Calamity, a Mud Bath, Is Man-Made
by Raymond Bonner and Muktita SuhartonoThe New York Times
October 6th, 2006
It started as a natural gas well. It has become geysers of mud and water, and in a country plagued by earthquakes, volcanoes and tsunamis another calamity in the making, though this one is largely man-made.

US: Doe Run ordered to clean up tailings site
by Cheryl WittenauerAssociated Press
October 2nd, 2006
The Environmental Protection Agency has ordered Doe Run Co. to clean up a mine tailings site in Leadwood, saying negotiations failed to produce a settlement.

LIBERIA: Mittal accused of creating a state within a state in Liberia
by David PallisterThe Guardian (UK)
October 2nd, 2006
A damning report on Mittal Steel's acquisition of an impoverished African country's iron ore reserves is published today, accusing the world's largest steelmaker of offering an inequitable "raw deal" that has created an unaccountable "state within a state".

CANADA: Mining Rights Trampling Human Rights, activists charge
by Stephen LeahyInter Press News Service (IPS)
September 29th, 2006
Activists want the Canadian government to impose mandatory human rights and environmental standards on Canadian mining and oil companies operating in Latin America and other developing regions.

CANADA: Activists Push for Sustainable Mining
by Stephen LeahyInter Press News Service (IPS)
September 29th, 2006
Civil society activists want the Canadian government to impose mandatory human rights and environmental standards on Canadian mining and oil companies operating in Latin America and other developing regions.

US: Dump site back on Superfund list
by Laura IncalcaterraThe Journal News
September 27th, 2006
Pollutants dumped by Ford Motor Co. and others have led the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to restore the Ringwood mines and landfill to the Superfund National Priorities List of the country's most-contaminated sites.

IVORY COAST: Ivory Coast waste 'was not toxic'
by Martin Plaut BBC News
September 26th, 2006
The company that discharged 500 tonnes of waste in Ivory Coast has denied that the product was toxic.

IVORY COAST: Toxic dumpers face jail term
Reuters
September 24th, 2006
SUSPECTS charged in connection with the dumping of toxic waste in Ivory Coast, which killed seven people and made thousands ill, could face up to 20 years in jail if convicted, a Justice Ministry official said.

IVORY COAST: Waste Headed for a Third World Bin
by Julio GodoyInter Press Service
September 21st, 2006
The Panamanian flagged ship Probo Koala unloaded more than 550 tonnes of toxic waste at Abidjan port in C- te d'Ivoire a month back. Emissions from that toxic waste have killed seven people and poisoned thousands.

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