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AFGHANISTAN: Missing: The £5bn aid needed to rebuild lives
by JEROME STARKEY AND ROSS LYDALL The Scotsman
March 25th, 2008
Vast sums of aid are lost in corporate profits of contractors and sub-contractors, which can be as high as 50 per cent on a single contract. A vast amount of aid is absorbed by high salaries, with generous allowances, and other costs of expatriates working for consulting firms and contractors.

US: Study says diesel emissions raise cancer risk
by Elizabeth Fernandez, Chronicle Staff WriterThe San Francisco Chronicle
March 20th, 2008
The analysis by the California Air Resources Board, released Wednesday night, shows that the greatest health dangers related to toxic air emissions stems from diesel trucks traversing the freeways and other roadways around West Oakland and the Port of Oakland.

US: Eli Lilly E-Mail Discussed Unapproved Use of Drug
by ALEX BERENSONThe New York Times
March 17th, 2008
John C. Lechleiter, an Eli Lilly official who is about to become the company's top executive, wrote an e-mail message in 2003 that appears to have encouraged Lilly to promote its schizophrenia medicine Zyprexa for a use not approved by federal drug regulators.

IRAQ: KBR Faulted on Water Provided to Soldiers
by Dana HedgpethThe Washington Post
March 11th, 2008
U.S. soldiers at a military base in Iraq were provided with treated but untested wastewater for nearly two years by KBR, the giant government contractor, and may have suffered health problems as a result, according to a report released yesterday by the Pentagon's inspector general.

US: Pollution Is Called a Byproduct of a 'Clean' Fuel
by BRENDA GOODMANThe New York Times
March 11th, 2008
The spills, at the Alabama Biodiesel Corporation plant outside this city about 17 miles from Tuscaloosa, are similar to others that have come from biofuel plants in the Midwest. The discharges, which can be hazardous to birds and fish, have many people scratching their heads over the seeming incongruity of pollution from an industry that sells products with the promise of blue skies and clear streams.

US: Fighting on a Battlefield the Size of a Milk Label
by ANDREW MARTINThe New York Times
March 9th, 2008
A new advocacy group closely tied to Monsanto has started a counteroffensive to stop the proliferation of milk that comes from cows that aren’t treated with synthetic bovine growth hormone.

CHINA: Solar Energy Firms Leave Waste Behind in China
by Ariana Eunjung ChaWashington Post
March 9th, 2008
The Luoyang Zhonggui High-Technology Co. of Henan, China, is a green energy company, producing polysilicon for solar energy panels. But the byproduct -- silicon tetrachloride -- is a highly toxic substance that poses environmental hazards.

US: In Shift, Ashcroft to Testify on Oversight Deal
by  Carrie JohnsonThe Washington Post
February 26th, 2008
Former Attorney General John D. Ashcroft agreed last night to appear at a House hearing to discuss his lucrative arrangement overseeing a medical equipment company, averting a showdown with committee members who had planned to meet today to authorize a subpoena.

US: Court Considers Protecting Drug Makers From Lawsuits
by GARDINER HARRISThe New York Times
February 26th, 2008
Less than a week after issuing a sweeping ruling that bars most lawsuits against medical device makers, the Supreme Court heard arguments Monday in the first of two cases that could determine whether drug makers receive similar protection.

US: Pfizer to End Lipitor Ads by Jarvik
by STEPHANIE SAULThe New York Times
February 26th, 2008
Under criticism that its ads are misleading, Pfizer said Monday that it would cancel a long-running advertising campaign using the artificial heart pioneer Robert Jarvik as a spokesman for its cholesterol drug Lipitor.

US: Inside the world of war profiteers
by David Jackson and Jason Grotto|Tribune reportersChicago Tribune
February 21st, 2008
Hundreds of pages of recently unsealed court records detail how kickbacks shaped the war's largest troop support contract months before the first wave of U.S. soldiers plunged their boots into Iraqi sand.

GLOBAL: 2 Reports At Odds On Biotech Crops
by Rick WeissThe Washington Post
February 14th, 2008
Dueling reports released yesterday -- one by a consortium largely funded by the biotech industry and the other by a pair of environmental and consumer groups -- came to those diametrically different conclusions.

CHINA: China Plant Played Role In Drug Tied to 4 Deaths
by ANNA WILDE MATHEWS and THOMAS M. BURTONThe Wall Street Journal
February 14th, 2008
A Chinese facility that hasn't been inspected by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration made the active ingredient in much of the widely used Baxter International Inc. blood-thinner that is under investigation after reports of hundreds of allergic reactions and four deaths among the drug's users, the agency said yesterday.

US: UnitedHealth Faces Suit Over Payment System
by VANESSA FUHRMANS and THEO FRANCISThe Wall Street Journal
February 13th, 2008
The New York attorney general said his office plans to sue UnitedHealth Group Inc. as part of a broader investigation into the way the health insurance industry sets payment rates for hospitals and doctors outside of their networks.

US: Committee Investigates Ad Tactics for Lipitor
by Stephanie SaulNew York Times
February 8th, 2008
A Congressional investigation revealed that Pfizer agreed to pay Dr. Jarvik $1,350,000 as a celebrity pitchman for the heart drug Lipitor, and wants to know how much stunt doubles in the ads may have also been paid.

US: Drug Ads Raise Questions for Heart Pioneer
by STEPHANIE SAULThe New York Times
February 7th, 2008
Celebrity advertising endorsements are nothing new, of course. But the Lipitor campaign is a rare instance of a well-known doctor’s endorsing a drug in advertising — and it has helped rekindle a smoldering debate over whether it is appropriate to aim ads for prescription drugs directly at consumers.

US: Some Campuses Decide Tobacco Company Money Is ‘Tainted’
by ALAN FINDERThe New York Times
February 4th, 2008
Across academia, universities and graduate schools are wrestling with whether to accept financing from tobacco companies for research or student activities. In the past few years, 15 public health and medical schools have turned away donations from the industry; McCombs’ move was unusual because of its longstanding ties to an array of corporations.

EL SALVADOR: "Life Is Worth More than Gold" Say Anti-Mining Activists
by Raúl GutiérrezInter Press Service (IPS)
February 1st, 2008
Peasant farmers from the northern Salvadoran province of Cabañas fear that mining operations planned for the region will consume 30,000 litres of water a day, drawn from the same sources that currently provide local residents with water only once a week.

PERU: For Peru's Indians, Lawsuit Against Big Oil Reflects a New Era
by Kelly HearnThe Washington Post
January 31st, 2008
Oxy is Occidental Petroleum, the California-based company that pulled a fortune from this rain forest from 1972 to 2000. It is also the company that Maynas and other Achuar leaders now blame for wreaking environmental havoc -- and leaving many of the people here ill.

CHINA: Tainted Drugs Tied to Maker of Abortion Pill
by JAKE HOOKER and WALT BOGDANICHThe New York Times
January 31st, 2008
A huge state-owned Chinese pharmaceutical company that exports to dozens of countries, including the United States, is at the center of a nationwide drug scandal after nearly 200 Chinese cancer patients were paralyzed or otherwise harmed last summer by contaminated leukemia drugs.

US: Altria to spin off foreign cigarette unit March 28
by Vinnee TongAssociated Press
January 31st, 2008
Altria Group Inc. said Wednesday it would spin off its international tobacco business on March 28, freeing it to pursue cigarette sales more aggressively without ties to its U.S. counterpart - and U.S. regulatory oversight.

US: McDonald’s Ending Promotion on Jackets of Children’s Report Cards
by STUART ELLIOTTNew York Times
January 18th, 2008
McDonald’s has decided to stop sponsoring Happy Meals as rewards for children with good grades and attendance records in elementary schools in Seminole County, Fla.

US: Antidepressants Under Scrutiny Over Efficacy
by DAVID ARMSTRONG and KEITH J. WINSTEINWall Street Journal
January 17th, 2008
The effectiveness of a dozen popular antidepressants has been exaggerated by selective publication of favorable results, according to a review of unpublished data submitted to the Food and Drug Administration.

EU: European Antitrust Regulators Raid Large Drug Makers
by STEPHEN CASTLE and JAMES KANTERNew York Times
January 17th, 2008
Antitrust regulators on Wednesday raided big European drug makers as part of an investigation into whether patents and lawsuit settlements are being manipulated to keep generic products off the market.

US: Protests Greet Nuclear Power Resurgence in US South
by Matthew CardinaleIPS
January 14th, 2008
Residents and environmental activists are in a bitter dispute with large U.S. energy corporations and the federal government over the safety of nuclear power, as more than a dozen corporations plan to, or have filed, paperwork to open new nuclear power plants, primarily in the U.S. South.

NIGERIA: Nigeria delays $44bn smoking case
by BBC NewsBBC
January 14th, 2008
A court in Nigeria has adjourned a multi-billion dollar lawsuit brought by the government against three major tobacco firms until March.

NIGERIA: Inefficient Gas Flaring Remains Unchecked
by Sam OlukoyaIPS
January 10th, 2008
Some of the largest multinational oil companies in the world -- including the U.K. and Dutch owned Shell, the French company Total, and the American companies Mobil and Chevron -- are responsible for the bulk of the scores of gas flares burning in Nigeria.

US: Cloned Livestock Poised
by Jane Zhang, John W. Miller and Lauren EtterWall Street Journal
January 4th, 2008
After more than six years of wrestling with the question of whether meat and milk from cloned animals and their offspring are safe to eat, the Food and Drug Administration is expected to declare as early as next week that they are. The food industry appears to be divided over the issue.

US: Suit says IBM dumped chemicals in New York state
by Dan Wilchins and Philipp GollnerReuters
January 3rd, 2008
Neighbors of a former IBM plant in New York state sued the company on Thursday, saying it released chemicals into the air, ground and water for nearly 80 years that caused birth defects and cancer.

US: Former miners oppose bond release
by Nathan BlackfordWarrick Publishing Online
January 2nd, 2008
Former miners do not want the Indiana Department of Natural Resources to release the final portion of a $4 million bond on a large section of the North Field at the Squaw Creek Mine.

EUROPE: Both Sides Cite Science to Address Altered Corn
by Elisabeth RosenthalNew York Times
December 26th, 2007
A proposal made by Europe’s top environment official, to ban the planting of a genetically modified corn strain produced by companies like Syngenta and Monsanto, sets up a bitter war within the European Union.

INDIA: Many rescued child laborers in India soon back at another dismal job
by Heidi J. ShragerChronicle Foreign Service
December 23rd, 2007
A 2006 report by the Child Welfare Committee found that 12 of 22 children from a village in the impoverished eastern state of Bihar were re-trafficked, mostly to different states, within a year after being rescued from a Delhi hand-embroidery sweatshop.

CHINA/US: The Recalls’ Aftershocks
by Louise Story and David BarbozaNew York Times
December 22nd, 2007
Toy makers are investigating whether they need to treat their tainted products with stabilization chemicals or if they must seal the toys in giant polyethylene bags.

CHINA: China Grabs West’s Smoke-Spewing Factories
by Joseph Kahn and Mark LandlerNew York Times
December 21st, 2007
In its rush to re-create the industrial revolution that made the West rich, China has absorbed most of the major industries that once made the West dirty.

GLOBAL: Mining Firms Bulk Up, Echoing Big Oil Mergers
by Patrick Barta and Robert Guy MatthewsWall Street Journal
December 18th, 2007
Mining are embarking on another round of deals that promises industry juggernauts with great influence over the cost of raw materials -- and, by extension, the price of consumer electronics, cars and new apartment blocks.

US: Producer of Poisonous Toy Beads Issues Apology
by Keith BradsherNew York Times
November 29th, 2007
The Hong Kong company that manufactured millions of poisonous toy beads in mainland China issued a public apology on Thursday, with the chairman saying that it had not occurred to anyone to check whether an inexpensive glue ingredient in the beads would be dangerous for children to eat.

DRC: Six arrested in Congo radioactive dumping scandal
by Joe BavierReuters
November 10th, 2007
Congolese authorities arrested six people in connection with the dumping of tonnes of highly radioactive minerals into a river near the southeastern town of Likasi. A report said some 17 tons of the minerals confiscated were destined for Chinese firm Magma.

US: Merck Agrees to Settle Vioxx Suits for $4.85 Billion
by Alex BarensonNew York Times
November 9th, 2007
Three years after withdrawing its pain medication Vioxx from the market, Merck has agreed to pay $4.85 billion to settle 27,000 lawsuits by people who claim they or their family members suffered injury or died after taking the drug.

US: Mom: Chemical-Laced Toy Made Son 'Drunk'
by Dikky SinnWashington Post
November 7th, 2007
Chemical on toy beads makes children sick.

US: Hearing on Beef Packaging Fails Activists' Smell Test
by Rick WeissWashington Post
October 30th, 2007
A congressional hearing on the use of carbon monoxide to keep meat looking fresh promises to be an odious affair.

US: Lessons Even Thomas Could Learn
by David LeonhardtNY Times
October 24th, 2007
Toy manufacturer RC2 recalls toys due to lead content, replacing them with new lead-contaminated toys.

US: F.D.A. Panel Urges Ban on Medicine for Child Colds
by Gardiner HarrisNY Times
October 20th, 2007
A Food and Drug Administration advisory panel voted Friday to ban popular over-the-counter cold products intended for children under the age of 6.

US: V.A. Is Limiting Use of Diabetes Drug
by Stephanie SaulNY Times
October 18th, 2007
The Department of Veterans Affairs has decided to severely limit the use of Avandia, the once-popular drug for Type 2 diabetes, delivering another blow to the product’s maker, GlaxoSmithKline.

SOUTH AFRICA: Old perils resurface as trapped S African miners emerge alive
by Alec Russell in CarletonvilleFinancial Times
October 5th, 2007
Old perils resurface as trapped S African miners emerge alive.

US: 77 multi-million dollar suits filed against Monsanto
by Chris DickersonWV Record
October 5th, 2007
A Charleston attorney has filed more than 70 cancer lawsuits against Monsanto and related companies over its old plant in Nitro.

US: Cribs Recalled After Deaths of 2 Children
by Michael M. Grynbaumnytimes
September 24th, 2007
One million cribs designed by Simplicity for Children, a manufacturer based in Pennsylvania, have been recalled after the suffocation deaths of at least two children, the government said yesterday. It was the company’s fourth recall in a little more than two years.

INDONESIA: Mr. Clean: Accused of Poisoning Indonesian Villagers, Rick Ness Tries to Prove His Innocence
by David CaseMother Jones magazine
September 10th, 2007
Ever since Rick Ness was accused of contaminating pristine Indonesian water, he's been spending a million a month to convince the world that he's innocent. And once you meet him, you'll want to believe him.

US: FTC: Milk Ads Not Misleading
by Sam HananelGuardian (UK)
August 28th, 2007
Federal regulators have turned down a request from Monsanto Co. to take action against dairy companies that advertise milk as free of synthetic hormones.

US: Lead found in more baby bibs? Bibs sold in Toys R Us, Babies R Us questioned
by Anna Marie KukecDaily Herald
August 16th, 2007
A California consumer group said Wednesday it has filed a legal action against Toys R Us and Babies R Us for selling vinyl baby bibs said to contain high levels of lead.

INDIA: Novartis Patents Case Far From Dead
by Praful BidwaiInter Press Service News Agency
August 9th, 2007
Cancer patients in India have reason to be relieved at a high court ruling this week which dismissed a petition by Swiss pharmaceuticals multinational corporation (MNC) Novartis challenging an Indian law which denies patents for minor or trivial improvements to known drugs.

INDIA: Setback for Novartis in India Over Drug Patent
by Amelia GentlemanThe New York Times
August 7th, 2007
Indian companies will be free to continue making less expensive generic drugs, much of which flow to the developing world, after a court rejected a challenge to the patent law on Monday.

US: Lawmaker Calls for Registry of Drug Firms Paying Doctors
by Gardiner HarrisNew York Times
August 4th, 2007
An influential Republican senator says he will propose legislation requiring drug makers to disclose the payments they make to doctors for services like consulting, lectures and attendance at seminars.

WORLD: We must count the true cost of cheap China
by Richard McGregorFinancial Times
August 2nd, 2007
In the wake of the multiple scandals over tainted Chinese food and drug exports in recent months, Chinese goods now have an indelible image of being not just cheap, but life-threatening as well. But the fact that wrongly labelled foods, liquor and pharmaceuticals have routinely sickened and even killed people en masse in China has been largely overlooked.

US: Mattel Recalls One Million Toys
by Louise Story New York Times
August 2nd, 2007
Mattel, the maker of Barbie dolls and Hot Wheels cars, is recalling nearly one million toys in the United States today because the products’ surfaces are covered in lead paint. According to Mattel, all the toys were made by a contract manufacturer in China.

CHINA: Thomas & Friends Toy Maker Discusses Lead Paint Problem
by Louise Story New York Times
July 26th, 2007
Since the toy manufacturer RC2, discovered lead paint on a Thomas train in April, it has tried to strengthen its safety safeguards in China.

US: FDA Panel to Review Avandia
by Jennifer Corbett DoorenThe Wall Street Journal
July 26th, 2007
The Food and Drug Administration will ask a panel of outside medical experts Monday whether it thinks GlaxoSmithKline PLC's diabetes drug Avandia should remain on the U.S. market.

US: Drug Safety Critic Hurls Darts From the Inside
by Stephanie SaulNew York Times
July 23rd, 2007
An activist doctor emerges as the nation's unoffical ariter of drug safety by digging deep into companies' clinical data. At the same time, he presides over industry-financeed research worth millions of dollars.

US: 3 Executives Spared Prison in OxyContin Case
by Barry MeierThe New York Times
July 20th, 2007
After hearing testimony from parents of young adults who died from overdoses involving the painkiller OxyContin, a federal judge Friday sentenced three top executives of the company that makes the narcotic to three years' probation and 400 hours each of community service in drug treatment programs.

NIGERIA: Pfizer wins early Nigeria battle
BBC News
June 26th, 2007
A Nigerian court has refused to allow more cases to be added to a lawsuit against a pharmaceutical giant accused of improper drugs trials on children.

INDONESIA: Mud Volcano Sullies Top Investment Firms
by Emad MekayInter Press News Service (IPS)
June 21st, 2007
Environmental campaigners are urging several heavyweight investment firms, including Credit Suisse, Barclays, Fortis Group and Merrill Lynch, to shoulder some responsibility for a catastrophic mud volcano on the Indonesian island of Java that resulted from a gas project the firms helped fund.

MALAYSIA: Death of a Migrant Worker
by Anil NettoInter Press Service News Agency
June 19th, 2007
False promises of good pay and healthy working conditions fed to Indian migrant workers in Malaysia have led to destitution, physical abuse, and now, it seems, death.

COLUMBIA: Studies Find DNA Damage from Anti-Coca Herbicide
by Stephen LeahyInter Press Service News Agency
June 16th, 2007
U.S.-funded aerial spraying of coca plantations in Colombia near the Ecuador border has severely damaged the DNA of local residents, a new study has found.

WORLD: Food Firms Accused of Pushing Toddler Milk
by Bellinda KontominasSydney Morning Herald
June 9th, 2007
Food and drug companies are using aggressive marketing tactics similar to those used in the tobacco industry to circumvent advertising bans on infant formulas and sell milk drinks to parents.

CHILE: Chile Must Pay US$5.4 Million to Aricans Living Amid Toxic Waste
by Mike HagerThe Santiago Times
June 1st, 2007
In a landmark case, Chile’s Supreme Court ruled this week that the state must compensate 356 residents of two slums in the northern mining city of Arica for health problems brought on by years of exposure to open deposits of toxic waste. Promel, the Swedish company responsible for the importation of the toxic materials, cannot compensate the plaintiffs because the company no longer exists.

US: Bristol-Myers to Pay Fine
Agence France Presse
May 31st, 2007
Bristol-Myers Squibb has agreed to plead guilty and pay a $1 million criminal fine for lying to the government about a patent deal on its blood-thinning drug Plavix, officials said Wednesday. The Justice Department said in a statement that the company’s actions had threatened to reduce competition for the drug, one of the best-selling prescription medications worldwide.

NIGERIA: Pfizer Faces Criminal Charges in Nigeria
by Joe StephensWashington Post
May 30th, 2007
Officials in Nigeria have brought criminal charges against pharmaceutical giant Pfizer for the company's alleged role in the deaths of children who received an unapproved drug during a meningitis epidemic.

THAILAND: Holding Big Pharma's feet to the fire
by Marwaan Macan-MarkarInter Press Service
May 17th, 2007
For nearly a week, the advertising pages of Thai- and English-language dailies have been the stage for debates on Thailand's decision to break patents on anti-AIDS drugs in the interest of public health. A lobby championing the cause of the powerful pharmaceutical companies ran full-page spreads in the morning newspapers with an eye-catching warning in large, bold text, which said: "The Wrong Prescription for Thailand".

US: Another Chemical Emerges in Pet Food Case
by 
DAVID BARBOZA
The New York Times
May 9th, 2007
A second industrial chemical that regulators have found in contaminated pet food in the United States may have also been intentionally added to animal feed by producers seeking larger profits, according to interviews with chemical industry officials here.

INDONESIA: Jakarta launches appeal in case against Newmont Mining Corp
Reuters
May 8th, 2007
Indonesian prosecutors have launched the first stage of an appeal after Newmont Mining Corp’s Indonesian unit was cleared in a high-profile pollution case two weeks ago, a court official said yesterday.

BRAZIL: Brazil to break Aids drug patent
BBC
May 4th, 2007
Brazil's president has authorised the country to bypass the patent on an Aids drug manufactured by Merck, a US pharmaceutical giant.

US: KFC to tell customers of chemical in potatoes
by Tim ReitermanThe Los Angeles Times
April 25th, 2007
To resolve a suit by the state attorney general, the maker of Kentucky Fried Chicken agreed Tuesday to tell its California customers that its fried or baked potatoes contain a suspected carcinogen.

CANADA: UN Body Holds Canada Responsible for Corporations’ Actions Abroad
by Mark CherringtonCultural Survival
April 10th, 2007
In a groundbreaking decision, the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD) has told Canada that it must rein in Canadian corporations operating on Indian land in the United States.

US: Gore needs a greener Apple
by Marc Gunther CNN Money
April 3rd, 2007
Environmental groups tell Al Gore to push the computer maker to improve its practices and limit its impact on the environment.

CHILE: Water clash at Chile copper mine
by Jane ChambersBBC News
March 26th, 2007
A dispute over water rights has hit one of Chile's largest copper mines, Los Pelambres.

BURMA: Natural Gas Project Threatens Human Rights
Human Rights Watch
March 24th, 2007
South Korean, Indian Investments May Lead to Complicity in Abuses

US: World Bank raps Exxon over Chad
by Lesley WroughtonReuters
March 22nd, 2007
The World Bank has told an Exxon Mobil-led consortium to take corrective action to fully compensate farmers in southern Chad who lost land and their livelihoods as the U.S. company expands its search for oil in the Doba basin.

US: Doctors’ Ties to Drug Makers Are Put on Close View
by Gardiner HarrisThe New York Times
March 21st, 2007
Dr. Allan Collins may be the most influential kidney specialist in the country. He is president of the National Kidney Foundation and director of a government-financed research center on kidney disease.

PERU: Human Rights Commission May Examine Violations at La Oroya, Peru
Earthjustice Legal Fund and CIEL
March 21st, 2007
Public health and environmental organizations from throughout the Western Hemisphere today announced the filing of a petition with the human rights division of the Organization of American States in Washington, D.C. The petition accuses the Peruvian government of doing little to halt contamination from a metallurgical complex that is impacting the lives and health of the citizens of La Oroya, Peru.

US: Lockheed: Health care data off-limits
by Donna WrightBradenton Herald
March 1st, 2007
Spokeswoman says she misunderstood company's policy on free medical plan

HONDURAS: Protests Mount Against Mining Giant
by Stephen LeahyMines & Communities
February 24th, 2007
Dangerous levels of lead and arsenic have been found in the blood of Honduran villagers living downstream from a controversial gold and silver mine owned by Canada's Goldcorp Inc., the world's third largest gold mining firm.

CHINA: China's besieged factories: Activists aim to expose unscrupulous labor practices to shame companies
by Craig SimonsAtlanta Journal-Constitution
February 14th, 2007
Lei Huang could be a poster child for China's laboring classes. For each 60-hour week he works on an assembly line for Foxconn, a manufacturer of electronics and computer parts in this south China manufacturing hub, he earns $32 and a bunk in a dormitory room with 19 other laborers.

NIGERIA: Oil Spill Displaces 10 Ijaw Communities
by Emma ArubiVanguard (Lagos)
February 13th, 2007
CHEVRON'S Abiteye flow station oil spill of over 1,500 barrels of crude has rendered over 10 Ijaw communities and 500 hundred persons homeless in Gbaramatu kingdom in Warri South West local government area of Delta State.

JAMAICA: Dust, stench and claim of impotence: Pollution killing us, say communities near bauxite plants - Firms insist waste not toxic
by Karyl WalkerJamaica Observer
February 11th, 2007
The approximately US$400 million earned by the bauxite sector last year means nothing to Sandra McLean and other residents of districts surrounding the Alumina Partners of Jamaica (Alpart) refinery in Nain, St Elizabeth.

NIGERIA: Corruption and Misuse Robs Nigerians of Rights
Human Rights Watch
January 31st, 2007
Human Rights Watch Report: Rivers State, Nigeria Local Governments Squander Oil Revenues Instead of Funding Health, Education

UK: Campaigners urge Shell to put profits into clean-up
by Terry MacalisterGuardian (UK)
January 31st, 2007
Record annual profits to be announced by Shell tomorrow should be used towards paying off a bill estimated at more than $20bn (£10bn) for the damage caused by its oil activities to local communities and the wider environment, according to an alliance of human rights and green groups including Friends of the Earth (FoE).

INDIA: Novartis challenges India's patent law
by Matthew AllenSwiss Info
January 29th, 2007
A court case brought by Swiss drugs giant Novartis in India could define how the industry distributes discount medicine to the developing world while maintaining profits.

BRAZIL: Enslaved workers make charcoal used to make basic steel ingredient
by Michael Smith and David VoreacosSeattle Times
January 21st, 2007
Enslaved workers make charcoal used to make basic steel ingredient

US: US farming watchdog accuses Wal-Mart of mis-selling
by Stephen Foley in New YorkIndependent (UK)
January 21st, 2007
Wal-Mart, the controversial retailing giant, is under investigation in the US over allegations it is trying to pass off non-organic foods as organic.

US: Nicotine boost was deliberate, study says
by Stephen SmithBoston Globe
January 18th, 2007
Data supplied by tobacco companies strongly suggest that in recent years manufacturers deliberately boosted nicotine levels in cigarettes to more effectively hook smokers, Harvard researchers conclude in a study being released today.

UK: Chief's Departure Ignites Criticism of BP's Structure and Environmental Policies
by Heather TimmonsNew York Times
January 16th, 2007
Poor management and cost-cutting created a dangerous work environment at oil giant BP, according to a report released today based on hundreds of interviews with employees.

UK: UK class action starts over toxic waste dumped in Africa
by John VidalGuardian (UK)
January 8th, 2007
Lawyers will today begin preparing the ground for one of the largest class actions heard in the UK over 400 tonnes of allegedly highly toxic waste dumped in the Ivory Coast from a cargo ship chartered by a London-based company.

UK: Probe after workers burned in toxic leak
The Northern Echo
January 5th, 2007
Dozens of workers at a Teesside chemical plant received hospital treatment after suffering burns and breathing difficulties following a leak of 4.5 tonnes of toxic chemicals.

US: Exxon Mobil's biggest oil spill is in Brooklyn, not Alaska
by Matthew LeisingBloomberg
January 4th, 2007
The biggest oil spill Exxon Mobil has to answer for is not the cargo that gushed from the Exxon Valdez tanker into Alaska's Prince William Sound. It is the fuel that soaked into the ground beneath a working class section of Brooklyn, New York.

US: Toxic Teflon: Compounds from Household Products Found in Human Blood
by Stan CoxAlternet
January 2nd, 2007
DuPont and other companies use those synthetic compounds to make an extraordinarily wide range of products, including nonstick cookware (e.g, Teflon), grease-resistant food packaging (e.g., microwave popcorn and pizza boxes), stain-resistant fabrics and carpets (e.g., Stainmaster), shampoos, conditioners, cleaning products, electronic components, paints, firefighting foams, and a host of other artifacts of modern life.

ASIA: Asian Govts Push Generic Drugs
by Marwaan Macan-MarkarInter Press Service
December 18th, 2006
In moves that are winning them praise, two South-east Asian governments -- in Thailand and the Philippines -- appear determined to push ahead with plans to provide cheaper generic drugs even if they incur the wrath of pharmaceutical giants.

UK: Renowned cancer scientist was paid by chemical firm for 20 years
by Sarah BoseleyThe Guardian (UK)
December 8th, 2006
A world-famous British scientist failed to disclose that he held a paid consultancy with a chemical company for more than 20 years while investigating cancer risks in the industry, the Guardian can reveal.

US: Apple gets low score in Greenpeace e-waste report
by Jim DalrympleMacworld
December 6th, 2006
Environmental group Greenpeace on Wednesday issued the first quarterly update on the technology industry’s performance on environmental issues. While the group recognized many companies are improving Apple does not appear to be among them — Apple remains in last place.

GHANA: Ghana's gold inflicts heavy price
by James HaselipPeople and the Planet
December 6th, 2006
Gold mining is Ghana�s most valuable export industry: in 2005, US$1.4 billion worth of gold was shipped from the country, dwarfing the value of its other major foreign currency earners - timber and cocoa. However, very little of the gold revenues stay in the country while damage to the physical environment by both large and small-scale mining is inflicting an incalculable cost to the economy with vast tracts of farming land permanently ruined, forests destroyed and water resources diverted and polluted.

PHILIPPINES: Banana firm bars DoH team from proving chemical poisoning
by  Jeffrey M. TupasInquirer (PHIL)
December 1st, 2006
Experts from the Department of Health (DoH) were denied entry Thursday by the management of the Tagum Agricultural Development Corporation, Inc. (Tadeco) to the company-owned hospital in Panabo City where victims of toxic chemical inhalation from the nearby town of Braulio Dujali in Davao del Norte were confined.

WORLD: Safety of Nanotechnology Needs More Attention
Environment News Service
November 28th, 2006
The number of consumer products made with nanotechnology is exploding, with a 70 percent increase in the past eight months. While recognizing the value of these molecular-level advances, critics say the Bush administration is doing too little to ensure the safety of nanotechnology for workers and the public.

US: BLIGHTED HOMELAND: Mining firms again eyeing Navajo land
by Judy PasternakThe Los Angeles Times
November 22nd, 2006
Decades after the Cold War uranium boom ended, leaving a trail of poisonous waste across the Navajo Nation, the mining industry is back, seeking to tap the region's vast uranium deposits once again.

US: Uranium mining could contaminate Goliad aquifer
by Joe CongerKENS 5 Eyewitness News
November 17th, 2006
Just a pound of uranium brings top dollar on the market and could help to wean the United States off its foreign oil dependence. However, opponents say it could threaten the environment around San Antonio.

US: The Package May Say Healthy, but This Grocer Begs to Differ
by Andrew MartinThe New York Times
November 6th, 2006
The chain, Hannaford Brothers, developed a system called Guiding Stars that rated the nutritional value of nearly all the food and drinks at its stores from zero to three stars. Of the 27,000 products that were plugged into Hannaford’s formula, 77 percent received no stars, including many, if not most, of the processed foods that advertise themselves as good for you.

US: Pfizer Drug Dealt Blow in Testing
by Alex BerensonThe New York Times
November 1st, 2006
Pfizer said yesterday that clinical trials of torcetrapib — a heart medication that is the most important drug in the company’s pipeline — confirmed that it raises blood pressure, a potentially serious side effect.

NIGERIA: Niger Delta bears brunt after 50 years of oil spills
by Jonathan BrownThe Independent (UK)
October 26th, 2006
Up to 1.5 million tons of oil, 50 times the pollution unleashed in the Exxon Valdez tanker disaster, has been spilt in the ecologically precious Niger Delta over the past 50 years, it was revealed yesterday.

IVORY COAST: Ivorians to sue 'toxic ship' firm
BBC News
October 24th, 2006
A Dutch lawyer representing some 1,000 victims of toxic waste dumped in Ivory Coast says he is suing the company that shipped the waste there.

US: Unwanted Imports: Goods deemed toxic elsewhere shipped to U.S.
Associated Press
October 15th, 2006
Destined for American kitchens, planks of birch and poplar plywood are stacked to the ceiling of a cavernous port warehouse. The wood, which arrived in California via a cargo ship, carries two labels: One proclaims "Made in China," while the other warns that it contains formaldehyde, a cancer-causing chemical.

US: Copper Plant Illegally Burned Hazardous Waste, E.P.A. Says
by Ralph BlumenthalThe New York Times
October 11th, 2006
A bankrupt copper giant facing billions of dollars in pollution claims across the nation pretended for years to recycle metals while illegally burning hazardous waste in a notorious El Paso smelter, according to a newly released Environmental Protection Agency document.

INDIA: 80,000 coal belt families face evacuation
Statesman News Service
October 10th, 2006
As many as 80,000 families living near the Jharia mine in Dhanbad coal belt face relocation. Officials say the coalfield area is, in effect, sitting on a “giant fireball deep inside the earth,” after they discovered at least six underground leaks of toxic fumes. Experts fear massive underground explosions followed by subsidence occuring at any moment.

US: Harvard Researcher Forced Bayer to Disclose Drug Toxicity Study
by Justin Blum and Eva von SchaperBloomberg
October 6th, 2006
Bayer AG's disclosure last week of a study showing that a promising medicine has deadly side effects came only after a Harvard drug safety expert told U.S. regulators that the research existed.

US: Oil Companies Settle Fuel Violations for $1.5 Million
Environment News Service
October 6th, 2006
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has reached a $1.5 million settlement with BP and Shell for alleged violations of the motor vehicle fuels provisions of the federal Clean Air Act.

US: Doe Run ordered to clean up tailings site
by Cheryl WittenauerAssociated Press
October 2nd, 2006
The Environmental Protection Agency has ordered Doe Run Co. to clean up a mine tailings site in Leadwood, saying negotiations failed to produce a settlement.

US: Dump site back on Superfund list
by Laura IncalcaterraThe Journal News
September 27th, 2006
Pollutants dumped by Ford Motor Co. and others have led the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to restore the Ringwood mines and landfill to the Superfund National Priorities List of the country's most-contaminated sites.

US: Tobacco firms to face US class action over 'light' cigarettes
by Simon BowersThe Guardian (UK)
September 26th, 2006
Leading tobacco firms in the US, including British American Tobacco, are to face a class action lawsuit seeking punitive damages of up to $200bn (£105bn) relating to the alleged fraudulent promotions suggesting "light" branded cigarettes are safer, or less addictive, than regular ones.

US: Tobacco Makers Lose Key Ruling on Latest Suits
by David Cay Johnston and Melanie Warner The New York Times
September 26th, 2006
In a legal blow to the tobacco industry, a federal judge in Brooklyn ruled yesterday that people who smoked light cigarettes that were often promoted as a safer alternative to regular cigarettes can press their fraud claim as a class-action suit.

IVORY COAST: Toxic dumpers face jail term
Reuters
September 24th, 2006
SUSPECTS charged in connection with the dumping of toxic waste in Ivory Coast, which killed seven people and made thousands ill, could face up to 20 years in jail if convicted, a Justice Ministry official said.

IVORY COAST: Waste Headed for a Third World Bin
by Julio GodoyInter Press Service
September 21st, 2006
The Panamanian flagged ship Probo Koala unloaded more than 550 tonnes of toxic waste at Abidjan port in C- te d'Ivoire a month back. Emissions from that toxic waste have killed seven people and poisoned thousands.

PERU: Leaching Out the Water with the Gold
by Milagros SalazarInter Press Service (IPS)
September 20th, 2006
The conflict that brought operations at Yanacocha, Latin America's largest gold mine, to a halt just a month after President Alan García took office in Peru was merely the latest illustration of the tensions between mining companies and local communities in the northern province of Cajamarca.

IVORY COAST: Ivory Coast Nabs 2 Execs in Dump Scandal
Associated Press
September 18th, 2006
Authorities arrested and charged two executives of a Dutch commodities company whose dumped toxic waste has caused seven deaths and widespread sickness in the Ivory Coast's largest city, a government official said Monday.

COLOMBIA: 'No' to Storm Sewer Runoff, Says Fishing Village
by Constanza VieiraInter Press News Service
September 14th, 2006
The residents of a picturesque fishing village in northern Colombia are up in arms against a storm drain system being built by a majority Spanish-owned water and sewage company that will serve shantytowns in the nearby port city of Santa Marta, discharging the runoff into the cove where their village is nestled.

Ivory Coast: More die from Ivory Coast waste
BBC News
September 12th, 2006
Six people have now died from the toxic waste dumped in the biggest Ivory Coast city, Abidjan, while 9,000 have sought treatment, the government says.

AFRICA: Toll jumps to 5,000 poisoned in Ivory Coast toxic waste scandal
Agence France Presse
September 10th, 2006
The human toll in Ivory Coast's toxic waste scandal rose sharply from 1,500 to more than 5,000 people contaminated by open-air dumping sites in Abidjan, the health ministry said.

US: Walking with purpose
by Edward MarshallThe Journal
September 5th, 2006
After 32 days and 380 miles of walking, Ed Wiley, a concerned grandfather of a Marsh Fork Elementary School student and grass roots activist, stopped in Shepherdstown Monday to speak with residents on his way to Washington where he hopes to meet with federal lawmakers. Wiley is on a mission to ensure the safety of the children in Sundial, W.Va., where their elementary school sits next to a coal preparation plant and just 400 yards downstream from a dam holding back over two billion gallons of toxic sludge.

WORLD: Private Sector 'Not the Answer to Poverty'
by Philip ThorntonIndependent (UK)
September 1st, 2006
Rich countries must deliver more money directly to poor nations to avert a growing health and sanitation crisis spreading across the southern hemisphere, Oxfam will say today.

INDIA: Union Carbide Must Clean Bhopal Mess - Residents
by Nityanand JayaramanInter Press Service (IPS)
September 1st, 2006
After an appellate court in the United States rejected claims by Bhopal city residents, seeking compensation from Union Carbide for environmental contamination around the site of the world's worst industrial disaster, plans are afoot to have the case transferred to India.

US: Schering-Plough Agrees To Plead Guilty, Pay Fine
by Denise LavoieAssociated Press
August 30th, 2006
Schering-Plough Corp. on Tuesday agreed to pay $435 million and plead guilty to conspiracy to settle a federal investigation into marketing of its drugs for unapproved uses and overcharging Medicaid for certain drugs.

US: It's Not Easy Being Green: Are weed-killers turning frogs into hermaphrodites?
by William SouderHarpers
August 25th, 2006
In the summer of 1997, Tyrone Hayes, a biologist at the University of California, Berkeley, accepted what seemed a harmless offer to join a panel of eight other scientists investigating the safety of the common weed-killer atrazine. The panel had been commissioned by atrazine's inventor and primary manufacturer, the Swiss-based chemical giant then called Novartis and since renamed Syngenta. The company wanted to know if its product threatened “non-target” organisms, including fish, reptiles, and amphibians—creatures whose fate had remained largely unexplored through the half century in which atrazine had become the most heavily used herbicide in the United States as well as one of its most widespread environmental contaminants.

INDONESIA: Newmont Exec to Defend Himself in Court
by Robin McDowellAssociated Press
August 25th, 2006
An American gold-mining executive was preparing Friday to defend himself in court for the first time against charges his company dumped millions of tons of mercury and arsenic-laced waste into an Indonesian bay, sickening villagers.

PHILIPPINES: Lafayette test run cause of water contamination
by Mark Ivan RoblasThe Manilla Times
August 25th, 2006
GOVERNMENT officials and Greenpeace activists have discovered contamination of the waters on Rapu-Rapu Island as the test run for the resumption of the operations of Lafayette Philippines Inc. continues.

US: Alaska's Air Sullied by Oil Production
by David R. BakerSan Francisco Chronicle
August 24th, 2006
North Slope operations -- like oil production facilities everywhere -- release into the air a steady stream of pollutants and greenhouse gases, spewed by vehicles, power generators and the drilling process itself. Estimates vary, but the North Slope oil fields probably produce more smog-forming nitrogen oxides than Washington, D.C., and more carbon dioxide than San Francisco.

THAILAND: Patent or patient? How Washington uses trade deals to protect drugs
by Alan Beattie, Andrew Jack and Amy KazminThe Financial Times
August 22nd, 2006
As the World Health Organisation's top man in Thailand, William Aldis knew Thai officials were hosting their US counterparts in the northern city of Chiang Mai to negotiate what to many outsiders might seem an entirely worthy objective: a bi­lateral free-trade deal. But he saw dangers - and decided to make his views public.

INDIA: Pesticide Charge in India Hurts Pepsi and Coke
by Amelia GentlemanInternational Herald Tribune
August 22nd, 2006
When claims were first published on the front pages of Indian newspapers this month that Coca-Cola and PepsiCo beverages were contaminated with pesticides, executives at the two companies were breezily confident that they could handle the issue. Three weeks later, though, they are still struggling to win back Indian consumers. One-quarter of India’s component states have imposed partial bans on their products, and a complex legal battle to overturn those bans is only just beginning.

US: Unapproved Transgenic Rice Found in U.S. Rice Supply
Environment News Service
August 21st, 2006
U.S. supplies of long grain rice have been contaminated with a genetically modified variety not approved for human consumption, Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns said late Friday. The secretary said he learned about the contamination from the company that engineered the rice, Bayer CropScience, and could say nothing about how the contamination arose.

US: Mother's Milk Saves Lives
by Alberto CremonesiInter Press News Service
August 21st, 2006
Although experts say that breastfeeding gives children the best start in life, protecting them from life-threatening diseases and providing essential nutrients, barely a third of all infants in developing countries are exclusively breastfed for the first six months.

WORLD: Has Coke become the new McDonald's?
by David TeatherThe Guardian (UK)
August 18th, 2006
Welcome to the Coke side of life. Africa's planned legal action is just the latest in a litany of alleged human rights and environmental abuses in developing markets that has made Coca-Cola a cause celebre.

US: Company testing mine to determine extent of uranium contamination
by Jim TiffinThe Gallup Independent
August 18th, 2006
A state geologist said Thursday afternoon Rio Cinto Mining Co., also known as Sohio Western Mining, is planning to drill two water wells and sample 11 vent shafts at a former uranium mining site north of the Pueblo of Laguna.

PERU: Indigenous Community to Take Oil Company to Court
by Milagros SalazarInter Press Service
August 17th, 2006
Arankartuktaram! This Achuar cry sums up what indigenous communities in the heart of Peru's Amazon jungle region are demanding from the State and multinational oil companies -- a little respect.

INDONESIA: Java sinks deeper into toxic crisis
by Mark ForbesThe Age (AUS)
August 12th, 2006
TOXIC mud still spurting from a gas drilling well part-owned by Australian mining giant Santos is threatening to mire East Java in a full-scale disaster.

US: Approval of Antibiotic Worried Safety Officials
by Gardiner HarrisThe New York Times
July 19th, 2006
In an internal review, a federal drug safety official concluded that a controversial antibiotic made by a French drug company should be withdrawn, according to e-mail messages exchanged among top agency officials.

VIETNAM: Tons of Expired Coca Cola Materials Destroyed in Vietnam
Thanhnien News
July 18th, 2006
Days before, municipal inspectors discovered almost 7.5 tons of aromatic spice material with 2003 expiry dates in the company’s warehouse.

NEW ZEALAND: Tobacco company's claims disputed
One News
July 14th, 2006
On it's website, British and American Tobacco says many claims against environmental or second hand smoking have been overstated.

US: Once an Enemy, Health Industry Warms to Clinton
by Raymond Hernandez and Robert PearThe New York Times
July 12th, 2006
Some of the same interests that tried to derail Mrs. Clinton’s health care overhaul are providing support for her Senate re-election bid. The Health Insurance Association of America ran the famous “Harry and Louise” commercials mocking the Clinton health care plan as impenetrably complex. Some companies that were members of that group are now donating to Mrs. Clinton.

WORLD: Prices Soar for Cancer Drugs
by Liz SzaboUSA Today
July 10th, 2006
Spiraling prices for new cancer therapies — up to $10,000 a month for a single drug — are causing alarm among patients and insurance companies.

INDIA: Petri Dish for Pharmaceutical MNCs
by Ann De RonInter Press News Service
July 10th, 2006
Pharmaceutical multinationals, seeking to ramp up profits through cheap drug trials, are increasingly turning to India with its combination of a vast pool of poor, ignorant patients on the one hand and skilled medical personnel and fine research infrastructure on the other.

US: Johnson & Johnson Told to Pay Damages in Pain-Patch Death
Bloomberg News
July 8th, 2006
Jurors in a state court in Houston decided yesterday that Johnson & Johnson, the consumer health care company, must pay $772,500 to the family of a Texas woman who died after a patch intended to release pain-killing drugs leaked.

US: Court Voids $145 Billion Judgment in Tobacco Case
by Jeremy W. PetersThe New York Times
July 6th, 2006
The Florida Supreme Court upheld today a decision that threw out a $145 billion judgment against the nation's largest tobacco companies.

US: Vioxx 'a Hazard,' Doctor Testifies
The Associated Press
July 6th, 2006
Patients who took the painkiller Vioxx were at risk of heart attacks and strokes — something shown by studies conducted years before the product went on the market, a doctor testified Wednesday.

US: Another Merck Drug Is Under Legal Attack
by Molly SelvinThe Los Angeles Times
July 5th, 2006
As Merck & Co. defends itself against a deluge of litigation involving its pain reliever Vioxx, the pharmaceutical giant also is fielding the first of what could be another wave of lawsuits involving Fosamax, its second-biggest seller.

US: Charities Tied to Doctors Get Drug Industry Gifts
by Reed AbelsonThe New York Times
June 28th, 2006
Around the country, doctors in private practice have set up tax-exempt charities into which drug companies and medical device makers are, with little fanfare, pouring donations — money that adds up to millions of dollars a year. And some medical experts see that as a big problem.

EUROPE: Drug Firms Attacked on Marketing
BBC News
June 27th, 2006
The Consumers International lobby group accused drugmakers of using the methods to get doctors to prescribe products and persuade consumers they need them.

US: Correction to Study Shows Vioxx Risks Appeared Early on
The Associated Press
June 26th, 2006
A correction published Monday to a key study on withdrawn painkiller Vioxx reveals the risk of heart problems was elevated throughout the time people were on the drug and did not develop only after 18 months of use as the drug's maker, Merck & Co., has contended.

US: Drug Firms a Danger to Health – Report
by Sarah BoseleyThe Guardian (UK)
June 26th, 2006
Drug companies are accused today of endangering public health through widescale marketing malpractices, ranging from covertly attempting to persuade consumers that they are ill to bribing doctors and misrepresenting the results of safety and efficacy tests on their products.

AUSTRALIA: Mt Isa Lead Risk For Children
by Michelle Wiese BockmannThe Australian
June 21st, 2006
Children in the Queensland mining capital of Mount Isa have been put at risk by fallout from the city's copper and lead smelters because the state Government has failed to routinely test for lead poisoning.

US: Drugs firm blocks cheap blindness cure
by Sarah BoseleyThe Guardian
June 17th, 2006
A major drug company is blocking access to a medicine that is cheaply and effectively saving thousands of people from going blind because it wants to launch a more expensive product on the market.

UK: Drugs Firm Blocks Cheap Blindness Cure
by Sarah BoseleyThe Guardian (UK)
June 17th, 2006
A major drug company is blocking access to a medicine that is cheaply and effectively saving thousands of people from going blind because it wants to launch a more expensive product on the market.

US: Lawyer: Merck Scrapped Study on Vioxx
by Linda A. JohnsonThe Associated Press
June 16th, 2006
Merck & Co. scrapped a planned study of the cardiac safety of Vioxx once it knew U.S. regulators were going to tone down their warning about heart risks for patients taking the painkiller, a plaintiff's lawyer argued Friday in a product liability trial.

US: KFC Gets Burned for Using Unhealthy Fat
Reuters
June 13th, 2006
A consumer group is suing the operator of the KFC to try to stop it from frying foods in an artery-clogging trans fat.

US: Ag-Mart influence alleged
by Kristin CollinsThe News and Observer
June 11th, 2006
A state report on pesticides and birth defects might have been influenced by the company that was its focus, some researchers who worked on the report say.

CANADA: Abnormal Birth Rates in Canadian Native Reserve
by Cindy Drukier and Rory XuThe Epoch Times
June 9th, 2006
There's something is in the air at the Aamjiwnaang First Nations reserve near Sarnia, Ontario. But it's not just in the air. It's also in the water, the soil, and in the residents themselves: alarming levels of toxic chemicals, believed to be behind the area's skewed birth ratios. In Aamjiwnaang, two girls are born for every boy.

US: Questions Raised on Another Chief's Stock Options
by Barnaby J. FederThe New York Times
June 9th, 2006
Accusations of corporate stock option abuse were leveled against Cyberonics, a medical device maker that is no stranger to controversy.

US: Grandmother Takes on Merck in Vioxx Trial
by LINDA A. JOHNSONAssociated Press
June 5th, 2006
Drug maker Merck & Co. repeatedly tried to downplay the cardiac risks of its painkiller Vioxx, so user Elaine Doherty didn't know about them and couldn't control them before she suffered a heart attack after taking the drug, her lawyer told jurors as a product liability trial began Monday.

CANADA: Air Pollution Goes Global
by Stephen Leahy Inter Press News Service (IPS)
June 2nd, 2006
Last month, the province of Ontario joined the states of New York, New Jersey and Connecticut, along with two environmental groups, in a legal action against seven coal-fired electricity plants run by Duke Energy Corp.

US: Needy Texans' Application Faxed into a "Black Hole"
by Polly Ross HughesHouston Chronicle
June 2nd, 2006
The snafu is just the latest example of confusion during the state's transition this year from public to private screening of health and welfare applicants under an $899 million contract with outsourcing giant Accenture LLP.

WORLD: WHO charges major tobacco firms for misleading public
Vietnam News Service
June 1st, 2006
The World Health Organisation (WHO) on Tuesday accused the tobacco industry of continuing to use misleading labeling such as light, clean, fresh, cool or mild in order to lure millions of people, many of them children, to take up the deadly habit of smoking.

AUSTRALIA: Judge Reopens Investigation of BAT
by Elizabeth SextonThe Age
May 31st, 2006
A Sydney judge has reopened the legal assault on the tobacco industry with a preliminary finding that British American Tobacco's controversial document retention policy was intended to conceal the destruction of legally potent records.

US: Merck Admits a Data Error on Vioxx
by Alex BerensonNew York Times
May 31st, 2006
In an admission that could undermine one of its core defenses in Vioxx-related lawsuits, Merck said yesterday that it had erred when it reported in early 2005 that a crucial statistical test showed that Vioxx caused heart problems only after 18 months of continuous use.

US: FDA Warns Wyeth on Quality at Puerto Rico Plant
RUETERS
May 30th, 2006
Possible contaminants in headache remedies, hormone replacement therapy and other pills made at Wyeth's (WYE.N: Quote, Profile, Research) plant in Puerto Rico have not been adequately checked out or corrected, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said on Tuesday.

WORLD: Drug Companies 'Failing to Meet Health Needs of World's Poorest'
by Jeremy LauranceIndependent (UK)
May 23rd, 2006
The existing system of drug patenting and pricing is fundamentally flawed and does not meet health needs, according to report released to health experts last month.

WORLD: From Asia to America, How Bausch's Crisis Grew
by Barnaby J. FederThe New York Times
May 18th, 2006
Early in March, Bausch & Lomb received a troubling phone call from a New Jersey eye doctor. Dr. David S. Chu, a specialist in cornea diseases, alerted the company that three of his recent patients had been afflicted with a microbe that caused a potentially blinding eye infection.

COSTA RICA: Farmers Win Suit vs. DuPont
by Randall ChaseAssociated Press
May 17th, 2006
A group of Costa Rican fern growers received a multimillion-dollar award against DuPont Co. on Wednesday for damages to their crops caused by the fungicide Benlate.

US: Disney Loses Its Appetite for Happy Meal Tie-Ins
by Rachel AbramowitzLos Angeles Times
May 8th, 2006
Disney is not renewing its cross-promotional pact with the fast-food giant, ending the arrangement with this summer's release of "Cars" and "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest." One reason, say multiple high-ranking sources within Disney, is that the company — which prides itself on being family friendly — wants to distance itself from fast food and its links to the epidemic of childhood obesity.

WORLD: Study Faults US health effort in Iraq, Afghanistan
by Will DunhamReuters
April 20th, 2006
The United States has botched efforts to improve public health in Iraq and Afghanistan, missing a chance to gain support in those countries, an independent report released on Wednesday said.

US: Experts Defining Mental Disorders Are Linked to Drug Firms
by Shankar VedantamThe Washington Post
April 20th, 2006
Every psychiatric expert involved in writing the standard diagnostic criteria for disorders such as depression and schizophrenia has had financial ties to drug companies that sell medications for those illnesses, a new analysis has found.

HONG KONG: Hong Kong Stores Accused in Pesticide Scare
Agence France Presse
April 18th, 2006
Hong Kong supermarkets have halted some vegetable sales amid a new food scare after pressure group Greenpeace accused grocery chains of selling produce tainted with dangerous levels of pesticides.

US: Study: Health Insurers Are Near-Monopolies
Associated Press
April 18th, 2006
Consolidation among health insurers is creating near-monopolies in virtually all reaches of the United States, according to a study released Monday.

US: Private contractor dropping eligible Texas kids from health coverage
by Polly HughesThe Houston Chronicle
April 18th, 2006
As of last week, 30,000 children had been dropped from the Childrens Health Insurance Program since Accenture, LLP began running the call center in December.

US: The Case Against Coke
by Michaeil BlandingThe Nation
April 14th, 2006
The Coca-Cola Company will hold its stockholders' meeting, an annual exercise designed to boost the confidence of investors. If the meeting is anything like last year's, however, it may do the opposite.

UK: Body Shop's Popularity Plunges after L'Oreal Sale
by Cahal MilmoThe Independent (UK)
April 10th, 2006
The sale of the Body Shop to the French cosmetics giant L'Oréal last month has dented the reputation of the British high street retailer once vaunted as the champion of ethical beauty products.

US: Food Companies Criticized Over Health Commitments
by Kate HoltonReuters
April 4th, 2006
Many of the world's top food companies are not doing enough to help cut the salt, fat and sugar which are contributing to a global, diet-related health crisis, according to a report on Tuesday.

NIGERIA: Government Investigation Indicts Shell over Toxic Waste
by Yemie AdeoyeVanguard (Lagos)
April 4th, 2006
THE Ministerial investigation committee into alleged dumping of toxic waste by the Shell Petroleum Development Company (SPDC) at Igbeku and Ejekimoni communities of Sapele local government area of Delta State has come up with recommendations for the company to remove and treat in situ the "alleged buried waste" to acceptable statutory levels.

AFRICA: WHO advisers urge drugs firms cut prices for poor
Reuters
April 3rd, 2006
International drugs companies should seek to reduce prices for medicines sold to the poorest countries and avoid filing for patent protection there, a report prepared for the World Health Organisation (WHO) said on Monday.

US: Benzene Fears Prompt Call for Banning Some Soft Drinks at Schools
by David GoldsteinKnight Ridder
March 28th, 2006
Some leading public-health experts want education officials to ban certain soft drinks from public schools until they're proved safe and free of the cancer-causing chemical benzene.

VIETNAM: Agent Orange Victims Gather to Seek Justice
Reuters
March 28th, 2006
Vietnam War veterans from the United States, South Korea, Australia and Vietnam gathered on Tuesday to call for more help for the victims of the Agent Orange defoliant used by the U.S. military.

US: Survey Ranks 'Organic-ness' at Dairies
by Marian BurrosThe New York Times
March 22nd, 2006
THE CORNUCOPIA INSTITUTE, a nonprofit agricultural policy research group in Cornucopia, Wis., will release a report today that ranks organic milk and dairy products based on federal organic standards as well as environmental and humane concerns.

US: Dirtier Side Betrays Promise of ‘Clean Coal’
by 
Kari Lydersen
The New Standard
March 15th, 2006
Between the coal-rich Appalachian Mountains and coal-hungry energy consumers like the state of Ohio, critics say the concept of an eco-friendly use for the fossil fuel is far more misnomer than reality.

US: Mercury control program approved despite objections
by Jeff DeLongReno-Gazette-Journal
March 9th, 2006
A mandatory program to control mercury emissions from Nevada gold mines was approved by state officials Wednesday over the objections of environmentalists and residents from the neighboring states of Utah and Idaho.

MEXICO: Mexican strikes cripple mines, mills and refineries
by Frank Jack DanielReuters
March 2nd, 2006
Tens of thousands of Mexican miners and metal workers joined a nationwide strike on Wednesday in two separate disputes that crippled output at the country's biggest mines, metals refineries and steel mills.

PERU: Bank Rejects Rapid Review of Controversial Pipeline
by Emad MekayInter Press Service News Agency
March 1st, 2006
The main public investor in a controversial gas pipeline in Peru's Amazon rainforest that has ruptured four times already appears adamant not to bow to pressure from green groups demanding a full investigation after a study asserted that the pipeline is shoddily built and likely to break again.

UK: Bone researcher: Proctor & Gamble is hiding data
United Press Inernational
March 1st, 2006
A British-based researcher Wednesday accused Procter and Gamble of hiding data regarding its osteoporosis drug Actonel.

US: Wal-Mart critics put workers in spotlight over health care
by Marcus KabelAssociated Press
February 28th, 2006
One of Wal-Mart Stores Inc.'s most vociferous critics launched a campaign Tuesday with 17 current and former Wal-Mart workers speaking out against health insurance coverage they claim is too expensive, leaving them uninsured or on taxpayer funded programs.

INDIA: Battle over Indian steel mills
by Mark DummettBBC News
February 26th, 2006
A South Korean firm, Posco, last year promised to build a steel plant costing $12bn - the biggest ever single foreign investment in India. The only problem is that many of the people living in Kalinga Nagar, near the town of Jajpur, do not want to make way for the new factories.

US: Chromium Evidence Buried, Report Says
by Rick WeissThe Washington Post
February 24th, 2006
Scientists working for the chromium industry withheld data about the metal's health risks while the industry campaigned to block strict new limits on the cancer-causing chemical, according to a scientific journal report published yesterday.

US: Company Town Relies on G.M. Long After Plants Have Closed
by Jeremy W. Peters and Micheline MaynardThe New York Times
February 20th, 2006
General Motors once had so many plants here that it had to stagger their schedules so that the streets would not be clogged with traffic when the workday ended. At the city's peak, 35 years ago, one of every three people in Anderson worked for G.M.

US: EPA cites Northshore Mining for clean-air violations
by John MeyersDuluth News Tribune
February 16th, 2006
The EPA alleged Wednesday that Northshore, a subsidiary of Cleveland-Cliffs and its former owner, Cyprus Minerals, modified three taconite furnaces at its Silver Bay processing plant without installing the best available pollution control technology.

INDONESIA: U.S. mine to pay Jakarta $30 million to settle suit
by Jane PerlezThe New York Times
February 16th, 2006
Newmont Mining agreed Thursday to pay $30 million to Indonesia in a settlement of a civil lawsuit in which the government argued that the company had polluted a bay with arsenic and mercury.

US: Maryland Power Plants Linked to 700 Premature Deaths Per Year
Environmental News Service
February 15th, 2006
Nationwide, 700 premature deaths, 30,000 asthma attacks and 400 pediatric emergency room visits each year are linked to current pollution from six Maryland power plants, according to a new study released today by the Maryland Nurses Association (MNA).

US: Teflon Chemical a Likely Carcinogen
by Randall ChaseAssociated Press
February 15th, 2006
A group of scientific advisers to the Environmental Protection Agency voted unanimously Wednesday to approve a recommendation that a chemical used in the manufacture of Teflon and other nonstick and stain-resistant products should be considered a likely carcinogen.

EU: Europe Defends Stance on Genetically Altered Foods
by Paul MellerThe New York Times
February 8th, 2006
The European Commission defended its current practices on screening genetically altered foods in the wake of a report from the World Trade Organization that criticized its past action in restricting the entry of modified products into the European Union.

US: Exposed: the secret corporate funding behind health research
by George MonbiotThe Guardian
February 7th, 2006
Three weeks ago, while looking for something else, I came across one of the most extraordinary documents I have ever read. It relates to an organisation called Arise (Associates for Research into the Science of Enjoyment). Though largely forgotten today, in the 1990s it was one of the world's most influential public-health groups.

US: Record Sales of Sleeping Pills Are Causing Worries
by Stephanie SaulThe New York Times
February 7th, 2006
Americans are taking sleeping pills like never before, fueled by frenetic workdays that do not go gently into a great night's sleep, and lulled by a surge of consumer advertising that promises safe slumber with minimal side effects.

US: EPA probing why arsenic found at toxic cleanup site
by Jan BarryNorth Jersey Media Group
February 7th, 2006
The federal Environmental Protection Agency is investigating the source of arsenic found at a cleanup site in Upper Ringwood where a Ford Motor Co. contractor recently removed tons of paint sludge.

WORLD: WHO Shuts Life Sciences Industry Group Out of Setting Health Standards
Environment News Service
February 2nd, 2006
The World Health Organization (WHO) has barred a life sciences industry association from participating in setting global standards protecting food and water supplies because its members have a financial stake in the outcome.

US: EPA Calls for End to Releases of Chemical in Teflon Process
by Marla ConeLos Angeles Times
January 26th, 2006
In a rare move to phase out a widely used industrial compound, the Environmental Protection Agency announced Wednesday that it was asking all U.S. companies to virtually eliminate public exposure to a toxic chemical used to make Teflon cookware and thousands of other products.

US: Multiple Risks of Surgery Drug Seen
by Thomas H. Maugh IILos Angeles Times
January 26th, 2006

GERMANY: Tobacco giant sponsors work on DNA repair
Nature.com
January 25th, 2006

US: How Dr. Weil, Dr. Phil, and Larry King Turn Your Trust into Cash
Center for Science in the Public Interest
January 25th, 2006
These three men use their fame to hawk vitamins, herbs, and other dietary supplements that often rely on inflated claims and dubious (or nonexistent) science. Consumers who buy these products may be overpaying or wasting their money entirely, according to CSPI.

US: Writer Says Ex-Chief of HealthSouth Paid for Positive Coverage
Associated Press
January 19th, 2006

US: Maryland Sets a Health Cost for Wal-Mart
by Michael BarbaroThe New York Times
January 13th, 2006
The Maryland legislature passed a law Thursday that would require Wal-Mart Stores to increase spending on employee health insurance, a measure that is expected to be a model for other states.

LATIN AMERICA: Big Tobacco Fights Back
by Diego CevallosInter Press Service
January 12th, 2006
According to the non-governmental Corporate Accountability International, based in the northeastern U.S. city of Boston, the tobacco industry is interfering in public health policy in several Latin American countries, and is attempting to block the regulations implemented in compliance with the World Health Organisation's Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC).

US: For One Clerk, Fight for Wal-Mart Bill Is Personal
by Mary OttoWashington Post
January 12th, 2006
The debate over the Fair Share Health Care Fund Act, commonly known as the Wal-Mart bill, has dominated politics in the run-up to the General Assembly, with the retailer arguing that Democrats have unfairly singled out one company and union leaders arguing that workers deserve better treatment.

US: Former Biogen Executive Settles Insider-Trading Charges
by John HechingerWall Street Journal
January 12th, 2006
The former general counsel of Biogen Idec Inc. settled securities-fraud and insider-trading charges, agreeing to pay more than $3 million related to his sale of company shares on the day the biotech company learned that a patient taking its new multiple sclerosis drug was sick with a deadly infection.

US: Boeing Settles Cancer Suit
Associated Press
January 12th, 2006
Boeing Co. has agreed to pay $30 million to settle a lawsuit by residents who alleged that pollutants from a company lab caused them to get cancer.

US: Moving Mountains
by Erik ReeceOrion Magazine
January 9th, 2006
It is the people of Appalachia who pay the highest price for the rest of the country's cheap energy—through contaminated water, flooding, cracked foundations and wells, bronchial problems related to breathing coal dust, and roads that have been torn up and turned deadly by speeding coal trucks.

US: Wal-Mart in Their Sights, States Press for Health Benefits
by Michael BarbaroThe New York Times
January 5th, 2006

US: General Electric workers sue Monsanto over PCBs
by Carey GillamReuters
January 4th, 2006
More than 500 General Electric Co. employees have sued Monsanto Co. along with two related companies, claiming they were exposed to toxic chemicals manufactured for decades by Monsanto, the company said Wednesday.

US: Abbott Suit Granted Class-Action Status
Associated Press
January 4th, 2006
A federal judge has granted class-action status to a lawsuit accusing Abbott Laboratories Inc. of cheating older workers out of retirement benefits when it spun off its hospital equipment business in 2004.

US: Feds Not Told of 2 Deaths During Study of Heart Drug
by Stephanie SaulThe New York Times
January 4th, 2006
The Scios unit of Johnson & Johnson yesterday added to the questions already clouding its heart failure medication Natrecor, saying the company had failed to tell federal regulators about the deaths of two patients in a clinical trial of the drug.

US: Judge Orders Ex-HealthSouth Chief to Repay Nearly $48 Million
by Kyle WhitmireThe New York Times
January 4th, 2006
A judge in Alabama ruled Tuesday that the former chief executive of HealthSouth, Richard M. Scrushy, must repay his former company more than $47.8 million in bonuses.

US: Opposition to Drug Co. Liability Protection Grows
by  Brendan CoyneThe New Standard
January 2nd, 2006
With enactment of a $453 billion defense spending bill at hand, opposition is growing over a provision granting pharmaceutical companies wide protection from lawsuits.

WORLD: Tobacco Companies Keep Profiting Despite Regulation
by Thomas Mulier and Chris BurrittBloomberg News
January 2nd, 2006
Shares of the three biggest companies - Altria Group, British American Tobacco and Japan Tobacco - are surging to record levels.

US: F.D.A. Puts Restrictions on Guidant
by Vikas BajajThe New York Times
December 28th, 2005
The Food and Drug Administration yesterday released a warning letter it sent to the Guidant Corporation, restricting the ability of the company to win approval for some new medical products. In the letter, sent a week ago, the agency said Guidant, the heart device maker, had not fully responded to its concerns about manufacturing procedures at the company's biggest plant.

US: Study Tied Pollutant to Cancer; Then Consultants Got Hold of It
by Peter Waldman Wall Street Journal
December 23rd, 2005
Amid contemporary debates about safe levels of chromium-6, a PG & E funded PR scandal involving medical report is remembered.

US: HealthSouth Founder Is Arraigned
Associated Press
December 22nd, 2005
Former Alabama Gov. Don Siegelman and former HealthSouth Corp. Chairman Richard Scrushy both proclaimed their innocence Wednesday at an arraignment on government corruption charges.

US: California Supreme Court overturns $14.8 million tobacco fine
by David KravetsAssociated Press
December 22nd, 2005
The California Supreme Court on Thursday overturned a $14.8 million fine the state imposed on R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. for illegally doling out free cigarettes at a beerfest, a biker rally and other public events.

US: Another Former HealthSouth Exec Gets Jail Time
by Verna GatesReuters
December 21st, 2005
A former HealthSouth Corp. finance executive was sentenced to a year and a day in prison on Wednesday for his part in the multibillion-dollar accounting fraud that rocked the company.

US: Lilly Pleads Guilty to Misdemeanor Violation
Reuters
December 21st, 2005
Eli Lilly and Co. said on Wednesday it will plead guilty to a misdemeanor violation as part of a settlement with the government over its marketing and promotional practices for an osteoporosis drug.

AFRICA: Death By Dilution
by Robert CockburnAmerican Prospect
December 20th, 2005
When fakes of a GlaxoSmithKline anti-malarial drug turned up in Africa, authorities assumed the drug giant would want to know. Instead, they learned about a huge, evil trade in fake drugs -- and about an industry that doesn’t want the truth to get out.

CHINA: Brand-name fix looms for tobacco firms in SAR first
by Mimi LauThe Standard (Hong Kong)
December 20th, 2005
Hong Kong may become the first jurisdiction in the world to force tobacco manufacturers to change the names of their brands, a government official has told legislators.

UGANDA: Ban Tobacco Adverts, Says Health Ministry
by Carol NatukundaNew Vision
December 19th, 2005
The health ministry of Uganda is exploring a ban on adverts and sponsorship by the tobacco industry.

INDIA: Testing Drugs on India's Poor
by Scott CarneyWired
December 19th, 2005
Multinational corporations are riding high on the trend toward globalization by taking advantage of India's educated work force and deep poverty to turn South Asia into the world's largest clinical-testing petri dish.

UK: Tobacco giants face smuggling fines
by Tom McGhie and Dan AtkinsonFinancial Mail
December 18th, 2005
Giant tobacco firms face punishing fines of more than £350m a year if they fail to help squash a smuggling racket that costs the Treasury billions in lost revenue.

AUSTRALIA: Ban on fruity smokes aimed at young
by Laura AndersonAdelaide Advertiser
December 18th, 2005
Fruit-flavoured cigarettes will be banned in South Australia under a State Government plan to curb smoking rates by 2010.

US: Philip Morris sells cigarettes, but can it sell integrity, too?
by Bruce MohlBoston Globe
December 18th, 2005
Philip Morris says it is trying to be a "responsible" tobacco company, but is that an oxymoron?

US: Emdeon says 10 former employees indicted by US
Reuters
December 15th, 2005

US: Court reverses Philip Morris verdict
by Brad DorfmanReuters
December 15th, 2005
The Illinois Supreme Court on Thursday reversed a $10.1 billion verdict against Philip Morris USA, ordering a lower court to dismiss the case in which the company was accused of defrauding customers into thinking "light" cigarettes were safer than regular ones.

US: DuPont fined more than $10M over Teflon
by Randall ChaseAssociated Press
December 14th, 2005
DuPont Co. has agreed to pay $10.25 million in fines and $6.25 million for environmental projects to settle allegations by the Environmental Protection Agency that the company hid information about the dangers of a toxic chemical used to make the non-stick coating Teflon, officials said Wednesday.

US: Big Tobacco Outspends Stop-Smoking Programs 28 to 1
Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids
November 30th, 2005
There is a growing gap between the inadequate amounts states are spending on tobacco prevention programs and the record sums the tobacco companies are spending to market cigarettes and other tobacco products, putting at risk the nation's progress in reducing youth smoking, according to a report released today by a coalition of public health organizations.

US: EPA, DuPont in Settlement Over Chemical
The Associated Press
November 29th, 2005
Federal regulators have reached an agreement with DuPont to settle allegations the company hid information about the dangers of a toxic chemical known as C8 used in the manufacture of Teflon.

US: Some Tenet holders call for Katrina probe
Reuters
November 17th, 2005
A dissident shareholder group on Thursday called for a complete investigation into the deaths that occurred in Tenet Healthcare Corp.'s New Orleans hospitals after Hurricane Katrina.

US: Engineer: DuPont hid facts about paper coating
by Elizabeth WeiseUSA TODAY
November 16th, 2005
A former engineer for the DuPont company has accused his ex-employer of concealing test results almost two decades ago that showed toxic chemicals leaching out of a paper coating used to give grease resistance to microwave popcorn bags, fast food and candy wrappers, and pizza box liners.

NIGERIA: In key ruling, court deems gas-flaring illegal
Reuters
November 15th, 2005
Issuing a landmark ruling that opens the way for compensation claims against oil conglomerates, a court in Nigeria has declared the flaring of natural gas illegal.

US: Small-town doctor takes on corporate health-care giant
by Tony MessengerColumbia (MO) Daily Tribune
November 15th, 2005

US: Neighbors of toxic mine want ARCO to pay for fence; EPA agrees
by Scott SonnerAssociated Press
November 13th, 2005
Neighbors of a toxic mine site in Nevada want to know why an oil company responsible for its cleanup won't fence off nearly 6 square miles of mill tailings and ponds.

INDIA: Health Minister: 'Coke Plant Will Not Be Allowed to Function'
The Hindu
October 25th, 2005
Health Minister K.K. Ramachandran on Monday said the Government "would not allow the bottling plant of Hindustan Coca-Cola Beverages Pvt. Ltd. at Plachimada to reopen against the will of the people." (Mr. Ramachandran is the first Minister to have visited Plachimada where the local people have been waging an agitation for the last three years demanding the closure of the company for allegedly exploiting the groundwater, leading to shortage of water for drinking and irrigation purposes.)

ECUADOR: Amazon Indians say Texaco left damage
by Gonzalo SolanoAssociated Press
October 20th, 2005
About 50 Cofan Indians, some holding handkerchiefs over their faces to fend off an acrid chemical stench, gathered around two contaminated open pits they say were left behind and never adequately cleaned up by the former Texaco Corp.

US: Smoking the fast-food industry: Fight against warning labels reminiscent of tobacco fray
by Thomas KostigenMarketWatch
October 6th, 2005
The state of California is suing nine top food manufacturers, including Burger King, Heinz and McDonald's, over their reluctance to issue warnings that some of their snacks could contain the potentially cancer-causing chemical acrylamide. Acrylamide was found to be linked to cancer in 2002. Then, the Swedish Food Administration reported high levels of it in carbohydrate-rich foods, such as french fries and potato chips, cooked at high temperatures. Studies indicated the chemical caused cancer in rats.

US: F.D.A. Had Report of Short Circuit in Heart Devices
by Barry MeierThe New York Times
September 12th, 2005
Months before the Food and Drug Administration issued a safety alert in June about problems with Guidant Corporation heart devices, the agency received a report from the company showing that some of those units were short-circuiting, agency records obtained by The New York Times show.

US: Vioxx Verdict Raises Profile of Texas Lawyer
by Alex BerensonThe New York Times
August 22nd, 2005
Merck is found liable for the death of Robert C. Ernst, who died in 2001 after taking Merck's painkiller Vioxx for eight months. The jury awarded $253.5 million to Carol Ernst, Mr. Ernst's widow and Mr. Lanier's client, in one of the largest damage awards ever to a single plaintiff.

US: Drug Industry Creates Voluntary Ad Guidelines
by Jennifer Corbett DoorenDow Jones
August 3rd, 2005
Responding to increased criticism from Congress, the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, or PhRMA, announced a set of voluntary guidelines aimed at governing the way drugs are advertised to consumers.

US: Wal-Mart Is Focal Point Of Democrats' Health Bill
by By Amy JoyceWashington Post
June 23rd, 2005
Several congressional Democrats introduced a bill that would force states to report the names of companies that have 50 or more employees who receive government-funded health care, an effort to pressure Wal-Mart Stores Inc. in particular to improve employee health coverage.

US: Health Care for People Too Busy for Doctor Visits
by Barbara PintoABC News
June 22nd, 2005
Speed and convenience aren't the only reasons these clinics are popping up at Target stores, CVS pharmacies and supermarkets. It's also good for business.

US: Pharmaceutical Giant Will Curb Ads Aimed at Patients
Associated Press
June 15th, 2005
Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. won't push new drugs in that way for at least a year. The change comes amid criticism of the industrywide practice.

PERU: Mining Groups Struggle to Operate
by Hal WeitzmanFinancial Times
June 4th, 2005

US: Despite Vow, Drug Makers Still Withhold Data
by  Alex BerensonNew York Times
May 31st, 2005

Chemicals May Damage Male Babies
BBC
May 27th, 2005
Chemicals found in many everyday products can harm male reproductive development, research suggests.

NICARAGUA: Chiquita's Children
by By Nicolas Bérubé and Benoit AquinIn These Times
May 23rd, 2005
In the ’70s and ’80s, the banana companies Dole, Del Monte and Chiquita used a carcinogenic pesticide, Nemagon, to protect their crops in Nicaragua. Today, the men and women who worked on those plantations suffer from incurable illnesses. Their children are deformed. The companies feign innocence.

WORLD: The Truth about McDonald's and Children
by by Morgan SpurlockIndependent
May 22nd, 2005
Obesity rates in American children remained stable throughout the 1960s, but they began to climb in the 1970s. In the past 20 years, the rate of obesity has doubled in children and trebled in teenagers. Kids are starting to clock in as obese as early as the age of two. If we find that surprising, we shouldn't.

US: Is Fast Food Just What the Doctor Ordered?
by Melanie WarnerNew York Times
May 2nd, 2005
In the last two years, at least two dozen leading nutrition scientists and experts have started working for large food companies, either as consultants or as members of health advisory boards. Most do not directly promote products, though Dr. Arthur Agatston, a practicing cardiologist and author of "The South Beach Diet," has a licensing deal with Kraft Foods to sell a line of South Beach foods, which are appearing on supermarket shelves this month.

LATIN AMERICA: AIDS Patients See Life, Death Issues in Trade Pact
by Marla Dickerson and Evelyn IritaniLA Times
April 22nd, 2005
Under CAFTA American pharmaceutical giants would gain a five-year edge on the development of new drugs by low-cost competitors. Generic versions of name-brand drugs are the main weapon for battling the AIDS pandemic in the developing world.

US: Jury Rules for Philip Morris
by  Myron LevinLA Times
April 22nd, 2005
A Moreno Valley man didn't prove that smoking caused his lung cancer, the panel decides after less than three hours of deliberations.

LATIN AMERICA: New Gold Rush Runs into Opposition
by Mark StevensonAssociated Press
April 12th, 2005
A surge in world gold prices is attracting U.S. and Canadian companies eager for another crack at the Latin American lodes that once enriched the Old World. But their modern-day methods -- strip mines and cyanide-based refining -- are meeting fierce resistance.

US: Fumes Delay Blast Probe
by Dina Cappiello, Tom Fowler and Kevin MoranHouston Chronicle
March 30th, 2005
Benzene vapors concern officials a week after the Texas City disaster

US: Lawsuit Will Force McDonald's to Reduce Hazardous Transfats
Associated Press
February 12th, 2005
McDonald's Corp. will pay $8.5 million to settle a lawsuit accusing the fast-food giant of failing to inform consumers of delays in a plan to reduce fat in the cooking oil used for its popular french fries and other foods.

US: Firm Accused Of Asbestos Coverup Contamination Scars Montana Town
by Carrie Johnson and Dina ElBoghdadyWashington Post
February 8th, 2005
Federal prosecutors yesterday charged W.R. Grace & Co. with exposing mine workers and residents in a small mountain community in Montana to deadly asbestos and covering up the danger.

SOUTH AFRICA: Durban's Poor Fight For Clean Air
by Grant ClarkBBC News
December 14th, 2004
If a poor community believes it is being poisoned, how can it find out if its fears are justified? Grant Clark visits South Durban, where outdated government legislation has left locals fighting their own battle for the truth.

USA: Drug Companies Pushing ADHD Drugs for Children
by Kelly HearnAlternet
November 29th, 2004
As public scrutiny of drug companies grows, so do questions about what critics say is a vast over-prescribing of MPH, especially as more adults are taking other MPH-based medicines such as Concerta. Many in and outside the scientific community suspect the dubious marketing tactics of big drug money have fueled the spiraled use of MPH.

US: States Are Battling Against Wal-Mart Over Health Care
by Reed AbelsonNew York Times
November 1st, 2004
In the national debate over what to do about the growing number of working people with little or no health insurance, no other company may be taking more heat than the country's largest employer, Wal-Mart Stores.

JAMAICA: Dust-Up Swirls Around Key Jamaica Industry
by Carol J. WilliamsLos Angeles Times
October 25th, 2004
People living near an Alcoa bauxite refinery say emissions are damaging their health. The government and business reject the claim.

US: Questions on the $3.8 Billion Drug Ad Business
by Stuart Elliot and Nat IvesNew York Times
October 13th, 2004
Drug advertising can not only misleading, but harmful to your health.

INDONESIA: Spurred by Illness, Indonesians Lash Out at Newmont Mining
by Jane Perlez and Evelyn RusliNew York Times
September 8th, 2004

INDONESIA: Newmont closes controversial mine – stages “planned” pull-out in Sulawesi
by James RoseEthical Corporation
August 25th, 2004
The US gold mining giant has announced it will get out of its controversial Minahasa Raya mine in northern Sulawesi as part of its scheduled program.

US: Rewriting Coal Policy; Friends in the White House Come to Coal's Aid
by Christopher Drew and Richard A. Oppel Jr. and Claire HoffmanThe New York Times
August 9th, 2004
Bush administration policies have abandoned a series of Clinton-era safety proposals favored by coal miners while embracing others favored by mine owners.

US: How Schering Manipulated Drug Prices And Medicaid
New York Times
July 31st, 2004
$345.5 million settlement by Schering-Plough to resolve a government Medicaid investigation provides a detailed glimpse into how drug companies can manipulate prices to overcharge state and federal programs.

US: DuPont Failed To Report Teflon Health Risks, Says U.S. EPA
by Chris Baltimore and David BrinkerhoffReuters
July 9th, 2004

US: A Record Year for Shareholder Activism
by G. Jeffrey MacDonaldChristian Science Monitor
June 28th, 2004
Question: What single force can get Tyco International to strive for cleaner emissions, inspire PepsiCo to study the impact of AIDS in developing nations, and even get Merck & Co. to declare its intentions to not manufacture an abortion pill? Answer: shareholders.

US: As Doctors Write Prescriptions, Drug Companies Write Checks
by Gardiner Harris New York Times
June 27th, 2004
A broad government crackdown on the drug industry's marketing tactics.

US: Want Cancer With That?
by Starre VartanAlterNet
June 1st, 2004
Carbs have been taking a beating lately, and the news isn't getting any better. A pending lawsuit filed against fast food mega-corps McDonald's and Burger King may leave one of America's most beloved junk foods with a cigarette-like warning label: "May cause cancer."

US: Health Advocacy Group Warns of Conflicted Science
by J.R. PeggEnvironment News Service
July 14th, 2003
Powerful corporate interests continue to use science and scientists to manipulate public opinion and influence public policy on health and the environment, experts say. The public may be aware of several prominent examples such as lead, tobacco and asbestos, but the "publicized cases are the tip of the iceberg," said Drummond Rennie, the deputy editor of the "Journal of the American Medical Association."

INDIA: Holding Corporate Terrorists Accountable
by Indra SinhaAlterNet
May 6th, 2003
At noon on May 1, two Indian women, watched by a crowd of sympathizers, seated themselves on the sidewalk under the bull statue on Wall Street to begin "a fast unto death." Rasheeda Bee and Champa Devi Shukla are survivors of what the people of Bhopal still refer to as "that night."

WORLD: Factory Farms Growing in Developing Nations
Environmental News Service
April 22nd, 2003
Factory farms are expanding into developing countries, bringing these nations a wealth of environmental and public health concerns, finds a new paper by the Worldwatch Institute.

South Africa: Indigenous Group Wins Rights to its Healing Herbs
by Mercedes SayaguesInter Press Service
March 28th, 2003
ANDRIESVALE, South Africa, Mar. 28 (IPS) -- In a victory for indigenous groups, a landmark profit-sharing agreement has been signed providing credit and compensation to one of South Africa's oldest groups with extensive traditional knowledge of healing plants and herbs.

ARGENTINA: Leap in Unsafe Abortions
by Marcela ValenteInter Press Service
March 12th, 2003
Hospital admissions arising from unsafe abortions in Argentina rose 50 percent in five years, and multiplied by a factor of 2.5 in some provinces -- a lethal consequence of the economic crisis and soaring poverty.

USA: Bush Blocks Cheap Drugs for World's Poor
by Charlotte DennyGuardian/UK
February 19th, 2003
George Bush's close links with the drugs industry were last night blamed for the failure of talks in Geneva aimed at securing access to cheap medicines for developing countries.

Brazil: Hopes Lift at WTO Drugs Talks
by Bayan RahmanFinancial Times
February 17th, 2003
Brazilian proposal at the weekend has raised hopes of a breakthrough in the World Trade Organisation's deadlocked talks on poor ountries' access to essential medicines.

UN: Water Deemed As Public Good, Human Right
by Gustavo CapdevilaInterPress Service
November 27th, 2002
The United Nations Committee on Economic, Cultural and Social Rights issued a statement Wednesday declaring access to water a human right and stating that water is a social and cultural good, not merely an economic commodity.

US: Cosmetics Industry Approves Controversial Chemicals
by Cat LazaroffEnvironment News Service
November 20th, 2002
The U.S. Cosmetics Ingredients Review panel has approved the continued use of phthalates in cosmetics, concluding that the chemicals are "safe as currently used." Activist groups, noting that the European Union has just ordered the phase out of some phthalates in cosmetics, said the panel's decision leaves U.S. women at risk of exposure to chemicals that some tests suggest may be linked to birth defects.

Taiwan: Workers Link Cancer to RCA Plant
by Matthew YiSan Francisco Chronicle
May 24th, 2002
While many laud the globalization of technology as a positive force that spreads the wealth and helps industry grow, a group of Taiwanese workers came to Silicon Valley Thursday to tell a different story.

US: Against All Odds, Goldman Prize Winners Protect the Earth
Environment News Service
April 23rd, 2002
Three North American tribal leaders who have defended the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge from oil drilling, share the North American Goldman Environmental Prize this year.

ECUADOR: Amazon Indians Appeal Texaco Case Ruling
by Gail ApplesonReuters
March 11th, 2002
Rainforest Indians of Ecuador and Peru urged a U.S. appeals court on Monday to reinstate nine-year-old litigation against Texaco, alleging that toxic dumping devastated their environment and exposed residents to cancer-causing pollutants.

ECUADOR: Farmers Fight DynCorp's Chemwar on the Amazon
by Jeffrey St. Clair and Alexander CockburnCounterpunch
February 27th, 2002
The International Labor Rights Fund has filed suit in US federal court on behalf of 10,000 Ecuadorian peasant farmers and Amazonian Indians charging DynCorp with torture, infanticide and wrongful death for its role in the aerial spraying of highly toxic pesticides in the Amazonian jungle, along the border of Ecuador and Colombia.

Bayer Won't Pull Poultry Antibiotics
BayerWatch.com
November 1st, 2001
Recent threats of bioterrorism have highlighted how important it is to safeguard the effectiveness of America's antibiotics supply. But when the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently proposed a ban on the use of certain antibiotics to treat sick chickens and turkeys, Bayer Corporation refused to comply.

USA: Crumbling Public Sector Makes Country Vulnerable to Bio-Terrorism
by Naomi KleinToronto Globe & Mail
October 24th, 2001
Only hours after the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, Republican Representative Curt Weldon went on CNN and announced that he didn't want to hear anyone talking about funding for schools or hospitals. From here on, it was all about spies, bombs and other manly things.

TURKEY: Court Bans Cyanide Gold Process Near Ancient Town
by Jon GorvettEnvironment News Service
January 16th, 2001
Despite an order from the country's Supreme Court backing up environmentalists, the pressure is mounting this week for the reopening of a controversial mine in one of Turkey's most visited tourist areas.

JAPAN: Snow Brand Inc. Merges with Nestle After Food-Poisoning Outbreak
Agence France Presse
September 26th, 2000
The dairy company at the centre of Japan's biggest ever food-poisoning outbreak said Tuesday it was tying up with Swiss giant Nestle, as it unveiled big job cuts in a bid to repair the financial damage.

US: Vermiculite Products Could Expose Consumers to Asbestos
by Cat LazaroffEnvironment News Service
February 15th, 2000
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is investigating whether products made from vermiculite could expose consumers to asbestos. Preliminary test results on common household products indicate that a particularly lethal form of asbestos fibers contaminates some attic insulation, but researchers do not yet know whether normal use of these products could endanger consumers.

US: Asbestos Tainted Ore Affected Thousands, Suit Charges
by Cat LazaroffEnvironment News Service
February 1st, 2000
A class action lawsuit filed Monday seeks cleanup and medical monitoring funds to help more than 26,000 people exposed to asbestos from contaminated vermiculite ore. The suit alleges that decades of unsafe mining operations in Libby, Montana have led to illness and death for thousands of mineworkers, processing plant employees, and Libby residents.

Bordering Injustice
by Traci Griggs and Martha ValdsLa Jornada
December 9th, 1998
Non-profit environmental justice groups such as the San Diego-based Environmental Health Coalition (EHC), are trying to remove the rose colored glasses and expose the harsh reality of the U.S/Mexico border in an attempt to protect public and environmental health. EHC's battle against an abandoned maquiladora turned toxic dump, serves as a microcosm of what's wrong with border health and how NAFTA, for the most part, has exacerbated the problem.

A Movement Blossoms: Cross-Border Activism Picks Up Speed
by Kent PatersonBorderlines
October 20th, 1998
In October 1998, after years of protest by an unprecedented bi-national coalition, the proposed Sierra Blanca nuclear waste dump was defeated. The proposed site for the commercial nuclear waste dump was just 16 miles from the Texas-Mexico border.

Death, Neglect and the Bottom Line
by William Allen and Kim BellSt. Louis Post-Dispatch
September 27th, 1998
St. Louis-based Correctional Medical Services leads the expanding field of private companies providing medical care behind bars. The industry tries to keep a low profile, but a five-month investigation by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch found a disturbing pattern of deaths and untreated illnesses behind bars.

US: Disney Shows Two Worlds
by Mark FritzAssociated Press
September 30th, 1996
Because Disney World controls so much of its corporate and municipal universe, it can't help but act in a heavy-handed manner in order to ferociously protect its self-interest.

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