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US/CHINA: U.S. Holds Fire in Google-China Feud
by JAY SOLOMON, IAN JOHNSONAnd JASON DEANWall Street Journal
January 12th, 2010
U.S. government officials and business leaders were supportive but wary of taking sides in Google Inc.'s battle with China, a sign of the delicate tensions between the growing superpower and the West. Google has threatened to bolt from China over censorship and alleged cyber spying.

IRELAND: U2 rattled by claims of tax dodging
by Michael SeaverChristian Science Monitor
March 3rd, 2009
The band that loves to rail against global corporate malfeasance is being criticized at home over allegations of tax dodging. The controversy stems from 2006, when the band moved its publishing company to the Netherlands to avoid a potential multi-million-euro tax bill after the Irish government capped artists' tax-free earnings at €250,000 ($315,000).

US: Radio Host Has Drug Company Ties
by GARDINER HARRISThe New York Times
November 21st, 2008
An influential psychiatrist who was the host of the popular NPR program “The Infinite Mind” earned at least $1.3 million from 2000 to 2007 giving marketing lectures for drugmakers, income not mentioned on the program.

IRAQ: U.S. to Fund Pro-American Publicity in Iraqi Media
by Karen DeYoung and Walter PincusWashingtom Post
October 3rd, 2008
The Defense Department will pay private U.S. contractors in Iraq up to $300 million over the next three years to produce news stories, entertainment programs and public service advertisements for the Iraqi media in an effort to "engage and inspire" the local population to support U.S. objectives and the Iraqi government.

US: When a Corporate Donation Raises Protests
by STUART ELLIOTTThe New York Times
March 12th, 2008
But a coalition of children’s advocates contends that the hospital went too far by agreeing to name a new emergency department and trauma center after another locally based retailer, Abercrombie & Fitch, in exchange for a $10 million donation.

US: Comcast Defends Role As Internet Traffic Cop
by Cecilia KangThe Washington Post
February 13th, 2008
Comcast said yesterday that it purposely slows down some traffic on its network, including some music and movie downloads, an admission that sparked more controversy in the debate over how much control network operators should have over the Internet.

US: Drug Ads Raise Questions for Heart Pioneer
by STEPHANIE SAULThe New York Times
February 7th, 2008
Celebrity advertising endorsements are nothing new, of course. But the Lipitor campaign is a rare instance of a well-known doctor’s endorsing a drug in advertising — and it has helped rekindle a smoldering debate over whether it is appropriate to aim ads for prescription drugs directly at consumers.

US: Black Given Prison Term Over Fraud
by Tim ArangoNew York Times
December 11th, 2007
Conrad M. Black is handed down a 6 1/2 year prison sentence for removing 13 boxes of documents from the office of his media company, Hollinter International.

US: Video Puts Canadian Part of Falls in US
by Matthew LeeThe Guardian
October 30th, 2007
The Bush administration appears to have annexed a major Canadian landmark as part of a slick new campaign to promote U.S. tourism and welcome foreign visitors to America.

US: Conrad Black Found Guilty in Fraud Trial
by Richard SilkosThe New York Times
July 13th, 2007
Conrad M. Black, the gregarious press tycoon also known as Lord Black of Crossharbour, was found guilty today by a Chicago jury of three counts of mail fraud and one count of obstruction of justice. He could face up to 35 years in prison.

THAILAND: Holding Big Pharma's feet to the fire
by Marwaan Macan-MarkarInter Press Service
May 17th, 2007
For nearly a week, the advertising pages of Thai- and English-language dailies have been the stage for debates on Thailand's decision to break patents on anti-AIDS drugs in the interest of public health. A lobby championing the cause of the powerful pharmaceutical companies ran full-page spreads in the morning newspapers with an eye-catching warning in large, bold text, which said: "The Wrong Prescription for Thailand".

US: Murdoch: I'm proud to be green
by Geoffrey LeanThe Independent (U.K.)
May 13th, 2007
News Corp boss orders his entire empire to convert and become a worldwide enthusiast for the environment

IRAQ: 'Pentagon Moved to Fix Iraqi Media Before Invasion'
by Jim LobeInter Press Service
May 9th, 2007
In the run-up to the March 2003 invasion of Iraq, the Pentagon planned to create a 'Rapid Reaction Media Team' (RRMT) designed to ensure control over major Iraqi media while providing an Iraqi 'face' for its efforts, according to a ‘White Paper' obtained by the independent National Security Archive (NSA) which released it Tuesday.

US: Hurdles Loom in Deal for Reuters
by AARON O. PATRICKWall Street Journal
May 9th, 2007
Thomson Corp. and Reuters Group PLC's ambitious plan to create the world's largest supplier of financial data and news could face regulatory hurdles as it would narrow the market to two main competitors from three.

US: Broadcasters Agree to Fine Over Payoffs
by Jeff LeedsThe New York Times
March 6th, 2007
Radio broadcasters have long been accused of corrupting the public airwaves by accepting bribes from corporate music giants. But in a pair of agreements disclosed yesterday, the broadcasters moved to resolve accusations that they had auctioned off the airwaves by agreeing to pay a landmark penalty and pledging to play more music from independent recording artists.

NETHERLANDS: Gimme Tax Shelter
by Lynnley BrowningNew York Times
February 4th, 2007
When it comes to attracting celebrity wealth seeking shelter from taxes, the Cayman Islands and other classic Caribbean tax havens are receding in favor, according to tax experts here and overseas. But for earnings derived from intellectual property such as royalties, the Netherlands has become a tax shelter of choice.

US: ExxonMobil Accused of Disinformation on Warming
by Jim LobeInter Press Service
January 3rd, 2007
Like the tobacco industry that for decades denied a link between smoking and lung cancer, ExxonMobil has waged a "sophisticated and successful disinformation campaign" to mislead the public about global warming, according to a major new report by the U.S.-based Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS).

EU: Exxon spends millions to cast doubt on warming
by Andrew Buncombe and Stephen CastleThe Independent (UK)
December 7th, 2006
The world's largest energy company is still spending hundreds of thousands of dollars to fund European organisations that seek to cast doubt on the scientific consensus on global warming and undermine support for legislation to curb emission of greenhouse gases.

US: Ponzi Scheme or Variety Show? Scams Use Leased Radio Time To Target Immigrant Listeners
by Jennifer LevitzWall Street Journal
October 31st, 2006
Rick Santos, manager of WLQY-AM in Miami, says he thought the popular Creole program that aired six days a week on his radio station was a "musical variety show." It was actually part of a fraud, according to the Securities and Exchange Commission. Scam artists used the radio for two years to promote an investment scheme that ensnared 631 Haitian immigrants and cost them nearly $6 million, a federal court ruled after an SEC complaint.

US: Air America on Ad Blacklist?
Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting
October 31st, 2006
An internal memo from ABC Radio Networks to its affiliates reveals scores of powerful sponsors have a standing order that their commercials never be placed on syndicated Air America programming that airs on ABC affiliates.

US: Ads Test Payola Case Settlement
by Jeff LeedsThe New York Times
October 25th, 2006
Hardly more than a year has passed since the nation’s biggest record labels started agreeing to a series of measures that were intended to end the industry’s long history of employing bribes and other shady practices to influence which songs are heard on the radio.

US: Bias written in black and white: study
by Nicholas HirshonNew York Daily News
October 24th, 2006
A lack of racially diverse newsrooms often leads to biased media coverage of major events such as Hurricane Katrina, according to a St. John's University School of Law study.

IRAQ: Pentagon Audit Clears Propaganda Effort
by Mark MazzettiNew York Times
October 20th, 2006
An American military propaganda campaign that planted favorable news articles in the Iraqi news media did not violate laws or Pentagon regulations, but it was not properly supervised by military officials in Baghdad, an audit by the Pentagon Inspector General has concluded.

IRAQ: Firm That Paid Iraq Papers Gets New Deal
by Rebecca SantanaAssociated Press
September 27th, 2006
A public relations company that participated in a controversial U.S. military program that paid Iraqi newspapers for stories favorable to coalition forces has been awarded another multimillion-dollar media contract with American forces in Iraq.

US: PR joins fight for hearts and minds
by David RobertsonThe Times (London)
September 18th, 2006
A NEW business in military public relations that is worth millions of dollars is emerging as consultants are being drafted into the battle for the world's 'hearts and minds'.

US: 10 Miami Journalists Take U.S. Pay
by Oscar CorralMiami Herald
September 8th, 2006
At least 10 South Florida journalists, including three from El Nuevo Herald, received regular payments from the U.S. government for programs on Radio Martí and TV Martí, two broadcasters aimed at undermining the communist government of Fidel Castro. The payments totaled thousands of dollars over several years.

MEXICO: TV spots throw Mexican business into election fray
by Chris AspinReuters
June 28th, 2006
Mexico's most powerful business group is putting its money where its mouth is only days before Sunday's presidential vote, with thinly-veiled TV ads critical of the leftist front runner.

US: PUSH Seeks Boycott of Oil Giant BP
by Liam FordChicago Tribune
June 13th, 2006
Leaders attending the annual Rainbow PUSH Coalition conference on Monday called for a boycott of oil giant BP PLC, a conference sponsor, and for a renewed focus on increasing minority representation on national television news channels, including CNN.

US: The Next Niche: School Bus Ads
by Caroline E. MayerThe Washington Post
June 4th, 2006
BusRadio, a start-up company in Massachusetts, wants to pipe into school buses around the country a private radio network that plays music, public-service announcements, contests and, of course, ads, aimed at kids as they travel to and from school.

RUSSIA: Russian Download Site Is Popular and Possibly Illegal
by Thomas CramptonInternational Herald Tribune
June 1st, 2006
So great is the official level of concern about AllofMP3 that American trade negotiators darkly warned that the Web site could jeopardize Russia's long-sought entry into the World Trade Organization.

US: Big Bonuses Still Flow, Even if Bosses Miss Goals
by Gretchen MorgensonThe New York Times
May 31st, 2006
As executive pay packages have rocketed in recent years, their defenders have contended that because most are tied to company performance, they are both earned and deserved. But as the Las Vegas Sands example shows, investors who plow through company filings often find that executive compensation exceeds the amounts allowed under the performance targets set by the directors.

IRAQ: U.S. Urged to Stop Paying Iraqi Reporters
by David S. CloudThe New York Times
May 24th, 2006

US: Disney Loses Its Appetite for Happy Meal Tie-Ins
by Rachel AbramowitzLos Angeles Times
May 8th, 2006
Disney is not renewing its cross-promotional pact with the fast-food giant, ending the arrangement with this summer's release of "Cars" and "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest." One reason, say multiple high-ranking sources within Disney, is that the company — which prides itself on being family friendly — wants to distance itself from fast food and its links to the epidemic of childhood obesity.

US: America's Fake News Pandemic
by Timothy KarrMedia Citizen
April 7th, 2006
A report released yesterday by the Center for Media and Democracy (CMD) and Free Press exposes corporate propaganda’s infiltration of local television news across the country.

US: Spitzer Criticizes Talks Between FCC, Stations
by Charles DuhiggThe Los Angeles Times
April 4th, 2006
New York Atty. Gen. Eliot Spitzer said Monday that federal regulators were negotiating behind his back with radio station groups to settle allegations of illegal payments for airplay, potentially helping the companies avoid serious punishment.

US: Smithsonian Agreement Angers Filmmakers
by Edward WyattThe New York Times
April 1st, 2006
Some of the biggest names in documentary filmmaking have denounced a recent agreement between the Smithsonian Institution and Showtime Networks Inc. that they say restricts makers of films and television shows using Smithsonian materials from offering their work to public television or other non-Showtime broadcast outlets.

US: The Conservative Hand of Hollywood
by Justin ClarkNerve.com
March 29th, 2006
The Christian leader of megaplex Regal Cinemas is trying to shape what audiences see -- and don't see -- at the movies.

US: Players Big and Small Are Sifting Through Pieces of Knight Ridder
by Katharine Q. SeelyeThe New York Times
March 27th, 2006
With the McClatchy Company set to accept bids, starting as early as tomorrow, for the 12 Knight Ridder papers it is selling, some of the potential buyers are looking at the country as if it were a giant chessboard. The goal is not to topple a king but to become one — a king of each regional market where potential buyers already own newspapers and can achieve economies of scale by buying pieces of Knight Ridder.

US: 'Washington Post' To Cut 80 Newsroom Jobs, Sources Say
by Joe StruppEditor & Publisher
March 10th, 2006
The Washington Post plans to cut at least 80 newsroom jobs through attrition and buyouts, according to sources at the paper who said editors began giving staffers the bad news on Thursday in meetings and continued today.

US: Spitzer sues major radio chain in 'payola' suit
Associated Press
March 8th, 2006
Gifts, trips and cash were used to pave the way for air time for certain songs and artists at radio stations owned by one of the nation's largest chains, according to lawsuit filed by state Attorney General Eliot Spitzer.

US: Diverse Coalition Battles AOL’s Email Tax
by Antone GonsalvesTechWeb
March 1st, 2006
A diverse coalition of groups, many of them not-for-profits, has launched a campaign to pressure America Online (AOL) into halting plans for a pay-to-send email system.

US: EFF Challenges Clear Channel Recording Patent
ag-IP-news
February 15th, 2006
The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) announced it has filed a challenge on Tuesday to an illegitimate patent from Clear Channel Communications. The patent - for a system and method of creating digital recordings of live performances - locks musical acts into using Clear Channel technology and blocks innovations by others.

US: Sales Brisk for "Wal-Mart" Docu As Accusations Fly
Reuters
February 15th, 2006
Berlin's European Film Market became the backdrop for yet another verbal battle between Wal-Mart and its filmmaker nemesis Robert Greenwald on Tuesday. The Greenwald-directed film "Wal-Mart: The High Cost of Low Price" made for hot sales but heated words at the market.

US: The Net Effect of Neutrality
by Eric HellwegTechnology Review
February 10th, 2006
In Congress this week, two sides presented their cases in front of a Senate committee that’s considering revising a 10-year-old telecommunications bill. The topic was Internet neutrality: the idea that all bits coursing along the Web should be treated equally.

US: Seated at Both Sides of the Table
by Scott WoolleyForbes
February 7th, 2006
To settle a $400 million debt he owes to himself, Carl Icahn wants to sell some prized possessions--to himself. Confused yet?

US: The End of the Internet
by Jeffrey ChesterThe Nation
February 6th, 2006
The nation's largest telephone and cable companies are crafting an alarming set of strategies that would transform the free, open and nondiscriminatory Internet of today to a privately run and branded service that would charge a fee for virtually everything we do online.

THAILAND: Thai PM shrugs off shares sale protests
by Amy KazminFinancial Times
February 6th, 2006
Thaksin Shinawatra, Thai prime minister, this weekend declared he would not bow to pressure and step down from office, even as tens of thousands of protesters gathered in Bangkok to demand his resignation.

MIDDLE EAST: Firms feel pain of people power
by Robert PlummerBBC News
February 3rd, 2006
The backlash throughout the Muslim world against a series of Danish cartoons caricaturing the Prophet Muhammad is having a severe impact on at least one prominent business in Denmark.

IRAQ: Planted Articles May Be Violation
by Mark MazzettiLos Angeles Times
January 27th, 2006

US: Wal-Mart's Musical Moves
by Abigail Goldman and Charles DuhiggLos Angeles Times
January 26th, 2006
This latest example of Wal-Mart's "direct procurement" approach continues the company's practice of upending the traditional relationship between the makers of goods and those who sell them. The deal has some in the recording industry alarmed at the thought of Wal-Mart's establishing direct partnerships with musicians and cutting out the labels. And it may just be the start.

US: How Dr. Weil, Dr. Phil, and Larry King Turn Your Trust into Cash
Center for Science in the Public Interest
January 25th, 2006
These three men use their fame to hawk vitamins, herbs, and other dietary supplements that often rely on inflated claims and dubious (or nonexistent) science. Consumers who buy these products may be overpaying or wasting their money entirely, according to CSPI.

US: Writer Says Ex-Chief of HealthSouth Paid for Positive Coverage
Associated Press
January 19th, 2006

US: Disney Paid Eisner $10.1 Million in '05
Associated Press
January 12th, 2006
Michael D. Eisner, former chief executive of the Walt Disney Company, received $10.1 million in compensation last year, including a $9.1 million cash bonus, according to the company's annual proxy statement filed Wednesday.

US: Lobbyist's Work for Publishers of Magazines Under Scrutiny
by By Katherine Q. Seelye KATHARINE Q. SEELYEThe New York Times
January 9th, 2006

CHINA: Microsoft Shuts Down Blog Potentially Offensive to China
by Kathy Chen and Geoffrey FowlerWall Street Journal
January 5th, 2006
Microsoft Corp. has shut down a popular Chinese-language blog that has run edgy content potentially offensive to Chinese authorities, amid China's continuing efforts to control information on the Internet.

IRAQ: Pentagon Paid Sunni Clerics To Aid Propaganda Effort
by David S. Cloud and Jeff GerthThe New York Times
January 2nd, 2006
A Pentagon contractor that paid Iraqi newspapers to print positive articles written by American soldiers has also been compensating Sunni religious scholars in Iraq in return for assistance with its propaganda work, according to current and former employees.

US: Ex-Qwest Executive Pleads Guilty to Wire Fraud
Reuters
December 28th, 2005
A former top executive of Qwest Communications International Inc on Wednesday pleaded guilty to wire fraud, avoiding a five-week trial that had been set to start on Tuesday.

US: Timeline of Qwest Woes
The Associated Press
December 28th, 2005

US: On Opinion Page, a Lobby's Hand Is Often Unseen
by Philip ShenonThe New York Times
December 23rd, 2005

US: Trial Against News Corp. Is Allowed to Go Forward
by Rita K. FarrellThe New York Times
December 21st, 2005

US: SEC charges 2 with trading on Stern deal
Reuters
December 19th, 2005
U.S. regulators said on Monday they charged two individuals with insider trading ahead of news in 2004 that radio shock jock Howard Stern was moving to Sirius Satellite Radio Inc.

US: Phone Company Bars Reporter From Its Shareholder Meeting
by Richard SiklosThe New York Times
December 16th, 2005
The IDT Corporation, a telecommunications and entertainment company that is under pressure for its languishing share price, barred a New York Times reporter from its shareholder meeting yesterday.

US: Conrad Black Indicted on Additional Charges
Associated Press
December 15th, 2005
Former newspaper mogul Conrad Black, already accused of fraud, was indicted by federal prosecutors Thursday on additional charges including racketeering and obstruction of justice. He now faces a maximum prison sentence of 95 years if convicted.

US: Ford, Reversing Decision, Will Run Ads in Gay Press
by Jeremy W. PetersThe New York Times
December 15th, 2005
Less than two weeks after the Ford Motor Company said it would all but eliminate its advertising in publications that cater to gays, the company reversed itself Wednesday.

US: DirecTV, Marketers Settle Charges Do-Not-Call Rules Violated, FTC Says
by Jonathan KrimWashington Post
December 14th, 2005
Satellite television operator DirecTV Group Inc. agreed to pay $5.3 million to settle charges it repeatedly violated rules against telemarketing to consumers whose names were on a national do-not-call registry, the Federal Trade Commission announced yesterday.

US: News Tycoon Stole Millions, US Charges
by Geraldine FabrikantThe New York Times
November 18th, 2005
Conrad M. Black, once a major force in business, political and social circles in Manhattan and London, was indicted in Chicago yesterday on charges that he and three former colleagues stole $51.8 million from Hollinger International, the giant international newspaper publisher he helped create.

CANADA: Ex-Chairman of Hollinger Black Indicted on Fraud Charges
Associated Press
November 17th, 2005
Press lord Conrad Black and three other executives were charged in a federal fraud indictment Thursday involving the $2.1 billion sale of several hundred Canadian newspapers and the abuse of corporate perquisites at newspaper publishing company Hollinger International Inc.

US:Texas Town Adopts Corporate Name
by Matt SlagleAssociated Press
November 17th, 2005
Texas Town Renamed 'DISH' As Part of Corporate Marketing Deal With Satellite TV Company

US: Bad Reception
by Art LevineAmerican Prospect
November 9th, 2005
Did cronies of Mouafac Harb, the executive who runs America's Arabic-language networks, get sweetheart contracts?

U.S.: A New Weapon for Wal-Mart: A War Room
by Michael BarbaroThe New York Times
November 1st, 2005
Wal-Mart is taking a page from the modern political playbook. Under fire from well-organized opponents who have hammered the retailer with criticisms of its wages, health insurance and treatment of workers, Wal-Mart has quietly recruited former presidential advisers, including Michael K. Deaver, who was Ronald Reagan's image-meister, and Leslie Dach, one of Bill Clinton's media consultants, to set up a rapid-response public relations team in Arkansas.

US: On Television, Brands Go From Props to Stars
by Lorne ManlyThe New York Times
October 2nd, 2005
Network, advertising and production executives say that this season, more and more brands will venture outside the confines of 30-second ads. They may have no choice: As technology and clutter blunt the effectiveness and reach of the commercial spots that have underpinned the television business for nearly 50 years, the various players are scrambling to adapt.

US: Magazine ad "unleashes hell" for Boeing and Bell
by Hal BerntonThe Seattle Times
October 1st, 2005
Boeing and its joint-venture partner Bell Helicopter apologized yesterday for a magazine ad published a month ago - and again this week by mistake - depicting U.S. Special Forces troops rappelling from an Osprey aircraft onto the roof of a mosque.

US: FCC to review payola settlement
by Brooks BoliekThe Hollywood Reporter
August 9th, 2005
The FCC's chairman on Monday ordered the commission's enforcement bureau to review the settlement New York reached with Sony BMG to end the state's investigation into payola allegations.

US: Sony Agrees to Halt Gifts for Airtime
by Jennifer BayotThe New York Times
July 25th, 2005
Sony BMG Music Entertainment, one of the world's largest record companies, agreed today to stop providing lavish gifts, free trips and other giveaways in exchange for airtime for its artists on radio stations, under the terms of a settlement with the New York attorney general's office.

US: File-sharing Suffers Major Defeat
by BBCBBC News
June 27th, 2005
The US Supreme Court has ruled that file-sharing companies are to blame for what users do with their software.

US: Reality Show Writers Want to Unionize
by Richard VerrierOrlando Sentinel
June 22nd, 2005
The guild representing Hollywood writers has disclosed that more than 75 percent of the scribes on TV reality shows have signed cards asking to be represented by the union.

US: The New Blacklist
by Doug IrelandLA Weekly
June 13th, 2005
The Christian right has launched a series of boycotts and pressure campaigns aimed at corporate America -- and at its sponsorship of entertainment, programs and activities they don't like.

US: Congress to Force Agencies to Identify Fake News
Reuters
May 3rd, 2005

US: Students Do Not Share Gonzales' View on Piracy
by By Lorenza Muñoz and Jon HealeyLos Angeles Times
April 29th, 2005
Attorney general says downloading bootlegs is illegal, but many students are unfazed. "When I buy a CD I feel like I'm paying for corporate lawyers and corporate headquarters and, no offense, but I don't want to do that. And I don't have to," says one.

US: Enron Movie 'Ultimate Morality Tale'
by Mark LeibovichWashington Post
April 29th, 2005
Alex Gibney --the director of the new film, "Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room" -- makes the people the story.

US: When Media Dogs Don't Bark
by Norman SolomonAlterNet
April 18th, 2005
The recent decision by General Motors to pull its advertising from the Los Angeles Times has not gone over very well.

US: Small Cinemas Screened Out of Major Releases
by Seema MehtaL.A. Times
April 18th, 2005
As a common practice, the big studios give dibs on potential blockbusters to the giant chains. The state of California is investigating.

US: Video Games Add Advertisements
by Matt RichtelNew York Times
April 11th, 2005
Until now, ads have appeared occasionally and haphazardly in video games. But a new advertising agency hopes to bring a more aggressive marketing approach to interactive media. The aim is to put up billboards and make product placements for mainstream advertisers in the cyberworlds of sports, shooting and strategy games.

Book Review: Thrilling Chronicle of Cons, Fools and a Business World Gone Mad
by Larry WilliamsThe Baltimore Sun
March 20th, 2005
A half-dozen books have been published about Enron's collapse, but Conspiracy of Fools, Kurt Eichenwald's richly detailed narrative, is likely to be a landmark record - not just of what went wrong at Enron, but of how American business went crazy during the 1990s, when it seemed that everyone had a shot at becoming a billionaire in the New Economy.

US: Apple Makes Blogs Reveal Sources
BBC news
March 14th, 2005
Apple has won its legal fight to make three bloggers reveal who told them about unreleased products.

US: Pepsi Puts a Lid on Kids' Ads
by  Andrew Ward and Jeremy GrantThe Australian
March 1st, 2005
PepsiCo, one of the world's largest soft-drink makers, has introduced voluntary restrictions on its advertising to children, in response to rising levels of obesity in the US and western Europe.

US: Nation Accused of Plan to Muzzle Al-Jazeera Through Privatization
by Rupert Cornwell The Independent Online
February 13th, 2005
America and its key ally Saudi Arabia are being accused of quietly seeking to muzzle al-Jazeera, the Arab satellite news station that has often incurred Washington's ire for its coverage of Iraq and President George Bush's "war on terror".

US: Once-Conservative Cable Company Profits off Porn
by Sallie HofmeisterLos Angeles Times
February 2nd, 2005
Today, analysts say, adult programming gives cable and satellite distributors their highest profit margins.

US: Marketing Under the Radar
by Deborah BranscumCMO
December 22nd, 2004
Stealth. Guerilla. Undercover. Whatever it’s called, covert marketing woos ad-weary consumers by pretending to be something it’s not. But is it the real deal for marketers?

UK: New Taskforce to Tackle 'Attacks' on Corporate Business
by Mark TranGuardian
July 6th, 2004
A leading business group today announced the creation of a taskforce designed to help companies respond to what it described as growing attacks on corporate behaviour.

US: Reuters Outsourcing Journalists
by Jacques SteinbergNew York Times
February 9th, 2004
Outsourcing has become all the rage in recent years, and India has become a favorite destination for Western companies that want to send jobs to cheaper markets. Companies as different as Delta Air Lines and Dell Computer have hired workers or subcontractors to perform customer service, data entry or other computer-related jobs once done in the United States. Now, Reuters is going a step further. It told its editorial employees in an electronic posting late last week that it planned to hire six journalists in Bangalore, India, to do basic financial reporting on 3,000 small to medium-size American companies.

MEXICO: Film Studio Sell-Off
by Jo TuckmanGuardian (London)
November 14th, 2003
Mexico's cultural elite is on the warpath, determined to stop a sell-off of state cultural institutions that will, they say, remove the last barriers to American cultural domination.

UK: Brussels Concerned by BSkyB Monopoly
by Daniel Dombey and Matthew GarrahanFinancial Times
October 1st, 2003
Mario Monti, Europe's competition Commissioner, on Wednesday turned his sights on British Sky Broadcasting, when he revealed plans to put forward a fresh set of objections to the satellite broadcaster's 1.02bn contract with English football's Premier League.

US: Recording Industry Targets 12 Year Old for File Sharing
by Frank AhrensWashington Post
September 10th, 2003
The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), the music industry's trade group, is targeting what it calls "major offenders" of peer-to-peer digital song sharing, which it considers to be a violation of copyright law. Federal law allows penalties of up to $150,000 per copyrighted work, or, in other words, per song.

US: NGOs in the US Firing Line
by Jim LobeInter Press Service
June 26th, 2003
Having led the charge to war in Iraq, an influential think-tank close to the administration of US President George W Bush has added a new target: international non-governmental organizations (NGOs). The American Enterprise Institute (AEI) is setting its sights on those groups with a "progressive" or "liberal" agenda that favors "global governance" and other notions that are also promoted by the United Nations and other multilateral agencies.

US: Nation's Ethnic Media Wary of FCC Changes
by Macrelo BallvePacific News Service
May 26th, 2003
In barrios, inner-city communities and immigrant enclaves nationwide, ethnic media reporters cover stories often ignored by mainstream newsrooms. Now, with a media deregulation plan being formulated by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), critics fear that ethnic media's civic role may be undermined.

US: FCC Chairman Refuses to Delay Vote
Associated Press
May 16th, 2003
Michael K. Powell, the Federal Communications Commission chairman, rejected today a request from two commissioners to delay a decision on overhauling rules governing ownership of newspapers and TV and radio stations.

US: FCC Close to Easing Media Caps
by Dan FostSan Francisco Chronicle
May 12th, 2003
The Federal Communications Commission is moving closer to easing its media ownership caps, including regulations that now limit how many television stations a network may own, or whether a company can own a newspaper and a television station in the same city.

US: Bush Top Gun vs. S.F. Activist
by Zachary CoileSan Francisco Chronicle
April 24th, 2003
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration's top Supreme Court lawyer urged the high court Wednesday to toss out a San Francisco consumer activist's suit against Nike Inc. because it could discourage corporations from defending themselves in public against their critics.

US: Mobilizing the Hip-Hop Generation
by Jesse Alejandro CottrellWireTap
April 23rd, 2003
To anyone who watches MTV all day -- where P. Diddy, Ja Rule and Nelly dominate the screen flashing fancy cars, gold chains and an entourage of scantily clad women -- political empowerment and hip-hop may seem like conflicting terms. But hip-hop has been political in nature since its birth in the youth subculture of the Bronx during the late 1970s. Unfortunately what started out as a gritty portrayal of what was really happening on the streets has been perverted in less than two decades into a seemingly endless supply of high-paid corporate clowns rapping about little more than the fact that theyre rich. Today, mainstream hip-hop is worse than apolitical -- it has become a tool to oppress and distract an entire generation of youth, especially youth of color

IRAQ: Amid Allied Jubilation, a Child Lies in Agony, Clothes Soaked in Blood
by Robert FiskThe Independent/UK
April 8th, 2003
They lay in lines, the car salesman who'd just lost his eye but whose feet were still dribbling blood, the motorcyclist who was shot by American troops near the Rashid Hotel, the 50-year-old female civil servant, her long dark hair spread over the towel she was lying on, her face, breasts, thighs, arms and feet pock-marked with shrapnel from an American cluster bomb. For the civilians of Baghdad, this is the real, immoral face of war, the direct result of America's clever little "probing missions" into Baghdad.

Socially Conscious Investors File Amicus Brief with Supreme Court in Nike v. Kasky
Domini Social Investments
April 7th, 2003
Domini Social Investments LLC today announced that it has filed an amicus brief with the U.S. Supreme Court that supports San Francisco activist Marc Kasky in his effort to hold Nike accountable for its statements concerning the company's use of sweatshop labor.

USA: INS Roundups Put Nation's Growing Ethnic Media in Bind
by Sandip RoyPacific News Service
December 30th, 2002
As editor of the San Jose-based Farsi monthly Pezhvak, Shahbaz Taheri says he strives to be a bridge between Iranian immigrants and American society. Now he fears he helped deliver some of his readers to jail.

AUSTRALIA: Libel Case Could Change Internet Future
by David Fickling and Stuart MillarThe Guardian
December 11th, 2002
Once it was heralded as the last bastion of freedom of speech, a realm which transcended national law and the whims of the courts. But last night the internet was facing up to a harsh new reality after Australia's supreme court ruled that a local businessman could sue a website for libel in Melbourne even though it was based in the United States.

US: Copyright Bill Gives Power to People
by Michael GrebbWired.com
October 4th, 2002
WASHINGTON -- With talk of preemptive war all the rage on Capitol Hill, it seems that such posturing has extended into the world of digital copyright law.

US: Recasting the Web, Info Commons to Cash Cow
by Karen CharmanExtra!
August 26th, 2002
If the Bush administration lets large media conglomerates and local telephone companies have their way, the Internet as we know it -- that free-flowing, democratic, uncensored information superhighway -- could soon be a thing of the past.

Mexico: Legislation Strikes Blow Against Privatization, Secrecy
by Dan JaffeeCommonDreams.org
April 28th, 2002
In less than 24 hours this past Wednesday, big advances for three major pieces of legislation indicated that Mexico -- for 20 years the ''model student'' of so-called free market policy reforms, and long noted for high levels of government secrecy and corruption -- may be charting a new, more independent course. At a moment when the Bush administration is chilling domestic dissent, restricting the free flow of information and promoting corporate deregulation, Mexico appears poised to do virtually the opposite.

US: Osama's Mama - Corporate Hip-Hop Promotes War
by Kevin WestonPacific News Service
November 5th, 2001
The night the United States began bombing Afghanistan, I was listening to a Bay Area hip-hop/R&B station, KMEL. KMEL is owned by Clear Channel, one of the largest radio conglomerates in the country.

US: Media Giants Lobbying to Privatize Airwaves
by Jeremy RifkinThe Guardian (London)
April 28th, 2001
Imagine a world in which a handful of global media conglomerates like Vivendi, Sony, BskyB, Disney, and News Corporation own literally all the airwaves all over the planet and trade them back and forth as 'private electronic real estate'. A strategy is beginning to unfold in Washington DC to make that happen.

US: 2001 Goldman Prize Winners Fight Greed
Environment News Service
April 23rd, 2001
The Goldman Environmental Prize for North America goes this year to Akre and Wilson. Winners in five other geographic areas are honored too with the world's largest prize for environmental activists.

USA: New Report Examines Commercialism in Schools
by Constance L. HaysNew York Times
September 14th, 2000
From exclusive soft-drink contracts to computers displaying continuous advertising, corporate marketing in public schools is rising sharply. But few states have laws in place to address the phenomenon, and most decisions on commercial arrangements in schools are made piecemeal by local officials, according to a report from the General Accounting Office scheduled to be released today.

Canada: Raffi Says No to Ads for Kids
by Raffi CavoukianToronto Globe & Mail
June 19th, 2000
Throughout my 20-plus years of making music for children, the core value at the heart of my work has been respect for the young child as a whole person. I have not accepted any offers to do commercial endorsements because I believe it's wrong to use one's popularity to sell products to a vulnerable audience.