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Brazil: Amazon Contractor Raytheon has CIA Ties
by Pratap ChatterjeeInter Press Service
December 3rd, 1995
A contract to monitor the Amazon rainforest in Brazil will include a shadowy company once described as ''virtually indistinguishable'' from the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). The 1.4-billion-dollar contract for satellite monitoring of drug trafficking and deforestation in the 3.2-million-square-kilometre forests in the Brazilian Amazon was awarded last summer to Raytheon, a 12-billion-dollar, Massachusetts-based company, Raytheon, that makes Patriot and Sidewinder missiles.

Brazil: Police Wiretap Jeopardizes Raytheon Radar Project
by Katherine Ellison The Miami Herald
November 25th, 1995
It was meant to be a shining model of the new era of inter-American trade: a $1.4 billion U.S. contract -- the largest ever awarded in Brazil -- in which the Massachusetts- based Raytheon Corp. would build a vast radar project in the Amazon jungle.

South Korea: General Dynamics Denies Bribery Allegations
by John MintzWashington Post
October 26th, 1995
A South Korean legislator alleged yesterday that General Dynamics Corp. paid former president Roh Tae Woo at least $100 million in 1991 in a successful effort to persuade the South Korean military to buy the company's F-16 fighters. The Falls Church-based company strenuously denied the allegation.

World: Bribe Probe For US Arms Firms
by Mark TranGuardian (London)
September 2nd, 1995
The US government is investigating two of America's biggest defence contractors, Lockheed Martin and General Dynamics, for possible bribery in foreign sales - with the world's most widely used fighter, the F-16, the apparent focus of interest.

US: Missile-Blower
by Daniel GoldenBoston Globe
July 19th, 1992
When MIT professor Theodore Postol punctured the Patriot missile's invincible reputation, he made some powerful enemies: Raytheon, the Army, and MIT administrators who valued corporate contributions over academic freedom

US: General Electric Expose Garners an Oscar
by Megan RosenfeldWashington Post
April 23rd, 1992
Chasnoff's film indicts the multi-billion-dollar corporation on two counts: failing to clean up the site of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in Washington state, and knowingly poisoning workers with asbestos and radiation at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory in Schenectady, N.Y. Scenes of Hanford area residents who have had or know of birth defects and cancer are juxtaposed with the familiar jingle: "GE: We bring good things to life."

Turkey: U.S. Businessman Slain; Terror Group Claims Responsibility
by Ahmet BalanNew York Times
March 22nd, 1991
Gunmen today killed a former U.S. Air Force officer working for an American company in Turkey, police said. A Marxist terrorist group claimed responsibility. It was the third time in two months the group - Dev Sol, or Revolutionary Left - said it was behind armed attacks on Americans.

US: The "Patriots" at Raytheon
by Jim DonahueMultinational Monitor
March 1st, 1991
Raytheon Corporation has recently become known throughout the United States as an outstanding defender of democracy thanks to its Patriot missile, which has attracted so much media attention for its role in the Persian Gulf War.

US: Secret Task Led to Web Of Firms; Virginian Ran Covert Missions
Washington Post
March 22nd, 1987
The mission that apparently launched the network of private companies now embroiled in the Iran-contra affair took place in October 1983, when an obscure U.S. Army unit asked a retired lieutenant colonel to undertake a secret job in the Caribbean, according to informed sources.

US: Oman Hold Delicate Negotiations Over Bases; Sultanate Pushing for Greater Control Over Access to Persian Gulf Facilities
by David B. OttawayWashington Post
July 19th, 1985
The United States has been involved for two months in delicate negotiations with the Persian Gulf sultanate of Oman, which is seeking more control over U.S. access to, and use of, its strategically located airfields and other military facilities.

Saudi Arabia: How U.S. Is Helping in Huge Arms Buildup by Saudi Arabia
by Smith HempstoneU.S. News & World Report
April 17th, 1978
An impressive combination of U.S. weapons and American know-how is helping turn this thinly populated kingdom into one of the leading military powers in the entire Middle East.

Saudi Arabia: This Gun For Hire
by Kim Willenson with Nicholas C. Profitt in Beirut and Lloyd Norman in WashingtonNewsweek
February 24th, 1975
In the aptly named Los Angeles suburb of Alhambra last week, a private contractor was recruiting a ragtag army of Vietnam veterans for a paradoxical mission: to train Saudi Arabian troops to defend the very oil fields that Henry Kissinger recently warned the U.S. might one day have to invade.

Saudi Arabia: Vinnell Adds Saudis To Its Trainee Roster
Business Week
February 24th, 1975
Vinnell Corp., has a $77-million contract to train Saudi Arabian forces to defend Saudi oil fields, but the Pentagon sidesteppped any probing questions about the contract, shunting them to the State Dept., which had approved it.



LIBERIA: Liberia recruits a new army
by Elizabeth BluntBBC News
The new Armed forces of Liberia are being trained by Dyncorp.

IRAQ: Indian Youths Coerced Into Iraq
by Ajay BharadwajDaily News & Analysis India
Human trafficking is not a new phenomenon in Punjab. However, it is the landing of young aspirants in Iraq that has started raising hackles.

US: Pentagon Stalls on Bannning Contractors that Use Forced Labor
by Cam SimpsonThe Chicago Tribune
A proposal prohibiting defense contractor involvement in human trafficking for forced prostitution and labor was drafted by the Pentagon last summer, but five defense lobbying groups oppose key provisions and a final policy still appears to be months away.

IRAQ: KBR Workers in Iraq Paid 50 cents an Hour
by Pamela HessUnited Press International
KBR hires out subcontractors whose job is to recruit, transport, house, feed and pay "third-country" nationals to stock, prepare, serve and clean up at the dining facilities at 43 bases across Iraq. As pressure to keep contract costs down, subcontractors have moved from country to country in search of cheaper labor markets.



US: CACI Plans to Drop Interrogation Work
by Ellen McCarthyThe Washington Post
CACI International Inc., the Arlington-based defense contractor that attracted controversy when an employee was accused of participating in the Abu Ghraib prison abuses, is getting out of the interrogation business.

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