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US: Lockheed Martin's Promotional Film
by Jacques PerettiGuardian (London)
August 3rd, 2000
The slick, multimillion dollar productions of Lockheed and Boeing are in a different class. After watching hours of these corporate arms videos, one is struck not by the weaponry or the technology but the absence of human beings. The few faces that do appear, fleetingly, are partially hidden behind visors and clad in fireproof space suits, pressing buttons. The complete invisibility of the victims of war that first became apparent to the world during the Gulf war has reached its logical conclusion in the arms video. The average 15-year-old boy would see more bloodshed playing Doom in his bedroom.

World: General Electric's Global Assault
by Russell Mokhiber and Robert WeissmanMother Jones
May 26th, 2000
While the 20-reign of General Electric's CEO has been a golden era for shareholders - the company's stock value has risen three time more than the Dow Jones average, leading Forbes magazine to name Welch the "Most Admired CEO of the Century" - it has been a disaster for employees.

US: A Blank Check from Washington for Colombia's Dirty War
by Mark WeisbrotAlterNet
April 1st, 2000
One of the problems with deleting our government's worst crimes from America's historical hard drive is that they tend to recur. How many people even know the hideous story of how we supported and financed the slaughter of tens of thousands innocent civilians, teachers, health care and church workers in Central America in the 1980s?

US: Slashing Safety?
by Nina ShapiroSeattle Weekly
April 1st, 2000
Is Boeing compromising on safety in order to cut costs? Some workers believe so, pointing to changes in the way the company carries out inspections. A former head of the National Transportation Safety Board, among others, seems to agree.

US: Raytheon Wants IDs of Net Chatters
by Leslie MillerAssociated Press
March 5th, 1999
Raytheon Corp. has sued 21 people for allegedly disclosing company secrets via the Internet in a case that raises questions about the wisdom of chatting about your employer online.

US: No Remorse from Raytheon Protesters
by Sarah GodcherEagle-Tribune
April 23rd, 1998
Seven anti-war protesters arrested at Raytheon last month held a vigil outside the Lawrence courthouse before a pre-trial hearing yesterday. Shown here are (from left) former North Andover resident Sean Donahue of Durham, N.H., and Marcia Gagliardi and Harriet Nestel, both of Athol, talking to Shannon O'Connor of Maine. But all seven self-described "Raytheon Peacemakers" rejected the offer in favor of a jury trial - all the while admitting they did cross a boundary line established by police.

China: Reviewing Ban of the Arms sales on China
by Steven Lee Myers New York Times
January 18th, 1998
On the eve of his trip to Asia this week, Secretary of Defense William S. Cohen pressed the Clinton Administration to let an American arms maker sell spare parts to China, despite a ban on sales of military equipment imposed after the Tiananmen Square massacre in 1989, Administration officials say.

US: The Northrop Grumman B-2 Boondoggle
by Ken SilversteinMultinational Monitor
September 1st, 1997
As the monitor goes to press, the U.S. Congress appears headed for a showdown vote on the fate of Northrop-Grumman's B-2 bomber, the single most expensive piece of military equipment ever designed, with a per unit price of about $2 billion. Congress has already allocated $44 billion for the project, a figure that exceeds the annual defense budget for all but four nations in the world (England, France, Japan and Germany). Now, hawks in the House led by Representative Norm Dicks of Washington state -- a major recipient of campaign cash from Boeing, a B-2 subcontractor -- are trying to win another $9 billion for the bomber. The Senate has voted to cap production at the current level of 20. A conference committee will soon resolve the issue.

Saudi Arabia: Royal Family Gets Quiet Help From U.S. Firm With Connections
by Charles J HanleyAssociated Press
March 22nd, 1997
Vinnell first came to Saudi Arabia 22 years ago on a "one-time" training mission. Today, under a Pentagon-supervised contract, its military specialists are permanent on-scene consultants throughout the National Guard. Three hundred Vinnell experts, almost all U.S. military veterans, many recently discharged, instruct Saudi guardsmen in the latest weaponry, supervise supply operations, teach brigade-level tactics, help operate a hospital and are updating the Guard's data processing, among other functions.

US: Old hands hold hands with Beijing on trade policy
by George ArchibaldThe Washington Times
March 3rd, 1997
Big bucks and big names are proving to be corporate America's weapons of choice in a heightened lobbying push to head off any U.S. retaliation for China's reported involvement in the unfolding political fund-raising scandal.

US: Lockheed Talks, the Pentagon Listens
by William HartungWashington Post
June 26th, 1996
His name is not a household word, but Norman Augustine is one of those rare Washington power brokers for whom a Cabinet-level position would be a demotion. Augustine is the chief executive officer of Lockheed Martin Corp., the world's largest defense conglomerate, and a key player in the network of quasi-official military-industrial interest groups. He will probably have as much to say about how much money the United States spends on weapons through the end of this decade as any secretary of defense.

Saudi Arabia: Mercenaries, Inc.
by William D. HartungThe Progressive
April 1st, 1996
The sanitized version of American foreign policy asserts that the United States is hard at work promoting democratic values around the world in the face of attacks from totalitarian ideologies ranging from communism during the Cold War to Islamic fundamentalism today. Every once in a while an incident occurs that contradicts this reassuring rhetoric by revealing the secret underside of American policy, which is far more concerned with propping up pliable regimes that serve the interests of U.S. multinational corporations than it is with any meaningful notion of democracy. The November 13, 1995 bombing of the Saudi Arabian National Guard (SANG) headquarters and an adjacent building housing a U.S. military training mission is one such incident.

Brazil: Amazon Contractor Raytheon has CIA Ties
by Pratap ChatterjeeInter Press Service
December 3rd, 1995
A contract to monitor the Amazon rainforest in Brazil will include a shadowy company once described as ''virtually indistinguishable'' from the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). The 1.4-billion-dollar contract for satellite monitoring of drug trafficking and deforestation in the 3.2-million-square-kilometre forests in the Brazilian Amazon was awarded last summer to Raytheon, a 12-billion-dollar, Massachusetts-based company, Raytheon, that makes Patriot and Sidewinder missiles.

Brazil: Police Wiretap Jeopardizes Raytheon Radar Project
by Katherine Ellison The Miami Herald
November 25th, 1995
It was meant to be a shining model of the new era of inter-American trade: a $1.4 billion U.S. contract -- the largest ever awarded in Brazil -- in which the Massachusetts- based Raytheon Corp. would build a vast radar project in the Amazon jungle.

South Korea: General Dynamics Denies Bribery Allegations
by John MintzWashington Post
October 26th, 1995
A South Korean legislator alleged yesterday that General Dynamics Corp. paid former president Roh Tae Woo at least $100 million in 1991 in a successful effort to persuade the South Korean military to buy the company's F-16 fighters. The Falls Church-based company strenuously denied the allegation.

World: Bribe Probe For US Arms Firms
by Mark TranGuardian (London)
September 2nd, 1995
The US government is investigating two of America's biggest defence contractors, Lockheed Martin and General Dynamics, for possible bribery in foreign sales - with the world's most widely used fighter, the F-16, the apparent focus of interest.

US: Missile-Blower
by Daniel GoldenBoston Globe
July 19th, 1992
When MIT professor Theodore Postol punctured the Patriot missile's invincible reputation, he made some powerful enemies: Raytheon, the Army, and MIT administrators who valued corporate contributions over academic freedom

US: General Electric Expose Garners an Oscar
by Megan RosenfeldWashington Post
April 23rd, 1992
Chasnoff's film indicts the multi-billion-dollar corporation on two counts: failing to clean up the site of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in Washington state, and knowingly poisoning workers with asbestos and radiation at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory in Schenectady, N.Y. Scenes of Hanford area residents who have had or know of birth defects and cancer are juxtaposed with the familiar jingle: "GE: We bring good things to life."

Turkey: U.S. Businessman Slain; Terror Group Claims Responsibility
by Ahmet BalanNew York Times
March 22nd, 1991
Gunmen today killed a former U.S. Air Force officer working for an American company in Turkey, police said. A Marxist terrorist group claimed responsibility. It was the third time in two months the group - Dev Sol, or Revolutionary Left - said it was behind armed attacks on Americans.

US: The "Patriots" at Raytheon
by Jim DonahueMultinational Monitor
March 1st, 1991
Raytheon Corporation has recently become known throughout the United States as an outstanding defender of democracy thanks to its Patriot missile, which has attracted so much media attention for its role in the Persian Gulf War.

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