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News Articles : Displaying 523-542 of 546

Germany: Farben to Create Slave Labor Fund
Associated Press
August 23rd, 2000
IG Farben, the German chemical company that made poison gas for Nazi death camps, will set up a compensation fund for Nazi-era slave laborers within weeks, an official in charge of liquidating the once-great firm said Wednesday.

TURKEY: Dam Will Destroy Kurdish Culture, Say Critics
August 16th, 2000
A Kurdish human rights lawyer is spearheading an international campaign to block the Turkish government's efforts to build a dam he says will dislodge thousands of Kurds and destroy archeological artifacts.

Burma: Cheney, Milosevic and Premier Oil Do Business with Junta
The Guardian (London)
July 28th, 2000
What do Dick Cheney, Slobodan Milosevic and the British company Premier Oil have in common? Answer: they all firmly believe in doing business with Burma, home to perhaps the world's most oppressive regime.

Nigeria: Court Fines Shell $40 Million for 1970 Spill
Environment News Service
June 26th, 2000
PORT HARCOURT, Nigeria -- A Rivers State High Court in Port Harcourt has ordered Royal Dutch/Shell to pay US$40 million in compensation for an oil spill which happened in 1970 in Ogoniland.

AFRICA: Illegal Diamond Trade Funds War in Sierra Leone
April 19th, 2000
Peace cannot be sustained in Sierra Leone until controls are imposed on the illegal selling of diamonds used to finance its civil war, according to a recent study.

USA: Oxy CEO Confronted by U'wa Leader in Congresswoman's Office
Environment News Service
March 30th, 2000
A surprise encounter in the Congressional office of Georgia Representative Cynthia McKinney today brought the vice president of Occidental Petroleum face to face with the president of the U'wa indigenous people who are fighting the company's oil drilling on their traditional land in Colombia.

Burma: US Oil Giant Pulls Out of Country
Agence France Presse
March 29th, 2000
Oil services provider Baker Hughes has become the latest United States firm to pull out of Burma, human rights campaigners and the firm's local partner said Wednesday.

US: High Court Considers Massachusetts Anti-Burma Law
by Steven MufsonWashington Post
March 23rd, 2000
Tearing a page from the anti-apartheid movement, the two drew up legislation that penalized companies with ties to Burma when those firms competed for Massachusetts state contracts. Using the draft of an anti-apartheid bill, they crossed out South Africa and inserted Burma. Two years later, the measure became law.

Mexico: First Census of Street Working Children
Child Labour News Service
March 15th, 2000
Alejandro and Adrian are two of 14,322 children who work illegally on the streets of this city of 20 million people, according to the first survey Mexico City has conducted on the trend. Mexican law prohibits children younger than 14 from working. According to Isabel Molina, director of the federal System for the Whole Development of the Family, officials completed the study, supported by UNICEF, in order to draft policies to resolve the problem.

USA: Union Carbide CEO Fugitive in Bhopal Suit
by Chris HedgesNew York Times
March 7th, 2000
Warren M. Anderson, chairman of the Union Carbide Corporation during the 1984 chemical disaster at Bhopal, India, has apparently gone into hiding to avoid a summons to appear in a Manhattan federal court as part of civil proceedings against him and the company, say lawyers who have hired a private investigator to locate Mr. Anderson.

USA: Clinton Backs Multinationals Against States in Challenge to Burma Sanctions
by Jim LobeInter Press Service
February 16th, 2000
In a major boost for the forces of economic globalisation, US President Bill Clinton has decided to back multinational corporations in a key court challenge to a Massachusetts law designed to promote democracy in Burma.

USA: People of Color Battle Toxics in Communities
by Cat LazaroffEnvironment News Service
February 11th, 2000
Ten African American children are visiting Washington, D.C. this week, but they did not come to see the usual tourist attractions. They are here to illustrate the dangerous legacy of hazardous wastes, contaminated manufacturing sites, and polluting industries, placed predominantly in poor, non-White communities.

Canada: Oil Company Targeted for Ties to Sudanese Military
by Mark BourrieInter Press Service
February 7th, 2000
An oil company headquartered in Alberta, Canada, is the target of a divestment campaign aimed at forcing the company to stop its partnership with the Sudanese government in the exploitation of oil fields in the war-torn southern region of Sudan.

Colombia: ILO to Investigate Alleged Rights Violations
by Yadira FerrerInter Press Service
February 4th, 2000
Colombia has come under the scrutiny of the International Labour Organisation (ILO), which begins Feb 7 to investigate alleged violations of the freedom to organise and of the human rights of workers.

India: Construction Industry Uses Toxic Waste
by Nidhi JamwalDown to Earth
January 31st, 2000
Ignorance is bliss. This seems to be the state of mind of the Indian government for several environment-related issues, including that of hazardous waste like phosphogypsum (PG). A byproduct of the fertiliser industry, PG is used liberally by the construction industry and its use is promoted by the government.

Peru: Isolated Amazon Tribes Threatened By Logging
by Danielle KnightInter Press Service
January 28th, 2000
The survival of four indigenous tribes of the Peruvian Amazon rainforest -- who have decided to live in voluntary isolation -- is being threatened by commercial logging, warned indigenous leaders who traveled here this week from the South American country.

USA: Prisoners Who Speak Out Receive Punishment, Suit Says
by Peter BlumbergSan Francisco Daily Journal
August 23rd, 1999
Two inmates allege in a lawsuit to be filed today that state corrections officials violated their civil rights by punishing them for helping the media expose a prison labor program as an illegal sweatshop, according to their lawyers.

MEXICO: Consumers Accuse Phone Company of Human Rights Violations
by Kent PatersonBorderlines
August 11th, 1999
For more than four years, Graciela Ramos and Women for Mexico have been a thorn in Telmex's side. The group has waged a campaign to force Mexico's privately-owned, local phone service giant to cancel measured service, provide devices that track the number of phone calls made from a home, and ensure that economically disadvantaged groups have access to both public and private telephones.

US: History of U.S. sanctions shows most haven't worked
by Michael PaulsonSeattle Post-Intelligencer
May 11th, 1999
The U.S. regularly imposes economic sanctions -- generally defined as restrictions on foreign commerce -- for purposes of foreign policy or national security. But numerous studies show that many of the targets of U.S. sanctions -- countries such as Iraq, Iran and Cuba -- do not change their behavior in the face of sanctions.

US: US banks named in Holocaust suit
BBC News
December 24th, 1998
Lawyers acting on behalf of victims of the Jewish holocaust and their families have accused two US banks of seizing their wealth during the Nazi occupation of France.

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