Contact l Sitemap

home industries issues reasearch weblog press

Home  » Issues » Human Rights

News Articles

INDIA: Camera Obscura and the manufacture of happiness
by Aman Sethi & Priscilla JebarajThe Hindu
March 6th, 2012
An advertisement flooding airwaves across India would have you believe that a company called Vedanta is a creating a product called happiness. But London-based Vedanta Resources has attracted the ire of environmental activists and human rights groups like Amnesty International who have accused the company of exploiting indigenous communities — such as the Dongria Kondhs of Niyamgiri in Odisha — without due process.

SYRIA: US technology used to censor the Internet in Syria
by Pratap ChatterjeeThe Bureau of Investigative Journalism
October 23rd, 2011
Technology from a major Silicon Valley company, Blue Coat, is being used by the Syrian government to censor the Internet and monitor dissidents, according to activists. The equipment can be used to monitor users and block access to certain websites, such as social networking applications like Facebook and internet phone sites like Skype, which were key to the Arab Spring uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia

CHINA: Group Says It Has New Evidence of Cisco’s Misdeeds in China
by Somini SenguptaNew York Times
September 2nd, 2011
Human Rights Law Foundation, accuses Cisco Systems of tailoring technology for the Chinese government to monitor and apprehend members of the banned Falun Gong organization.

U.K.: Bell Pottinger acted for controversial Yemen organization
by Melanie NewmanThe Bureau of Investigative Journalism
September 1st, 2011
Bell Pottinger, the London-based public relations firm, has been working for Yemen’s National Awareness Authority, which is run by the nephew of Yemen’s president, Ali Abdullah Saleh. The organization has been accused of spreading propaganda on behalf of the government.

LIBYA: Censorship Inc.
by Paul Sonne and Margaret CokerThe Wall Street Journal
August 30th, 2011
Amesys of France, VASTech of South Africa and ZTE Corp. of China provided technology to Libya that was allegedly used for the repression of Libyan citizens during the four decade rule of Colonel Gadhafi.

LIBERIA: Hunting for Liberia’s Missing Millions
by Doreen CarvjalNew York Times
May 30th, 2010
How much money did Charles G. Taylor, the deposed president of Liberia, siphon out of his war-shattered country, and where is it? Investigators are developing a new strategy involving filing civil damage claims against companies, governments and international banks that they contend aided Mr. Taylor in illegal transactions.

NIGERIA: Nigeria's agony dwarfs the Gulf oil spill. The US and Europe ignore it
by John VidalThe Guardian (UK)
May 30th, 2010
With 606 oilfields, the Niger delta supplies 40% of all the crude the United States imports and is the world capital of oil pollution. More oil is spilled from the delta's network of terminals, pipes, pumping stations and oil platforms every year than has been lost in the current BP/Transocean oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

US: FBI Probes Explosion in West Virginia Mine
by Kris Maher and Siobhan HughesWall Street Journal
April 30th, 2010
The Federal Bureau of Investigation is conducting a criminal probe of the deadly explosion at a Massey Energy Co. mine in West Virginia in early April that killed 29 miners, according to people familiar with the matter. In a statement on Friday Massey Energy said, "Massey has no knowledge of criminal wrongdoing."

BURMA: Pressure Mounts on Energy Giant Chevron to Disclose Revenue
by Marwaan Macan-Markar Inter Press Service (IPS)
April 29th, 2010
When shareholders of the multinational company Chevron gather for their annual meeting in the U.S. city of Houston in late May, they will come face to face with Naing Htoo, whose community has suffered due to the exploits of the energy giant in military-ruled Burma.

CANADA: Munk takes on mine protesters, defends capitalism
by John SpearsThe Star
April 28th, 2010
Mark Ekepa journeyed from Papua New Guinea to tell the shareholders of Barrick Gold Corp. how police had burned down his house near the Barrick’s Porgera mine. Idolia Bornones travelled from Chile to say that Barrick operations are damaging local glaciers and rivers. But Barrick chairman Peter Munk was unrepentant as he faced the company’s annual meeting.

CANADA/CHINA: Canada looks to China to exploit oil sands rejected by US
by Suzanne GoldenbergThe Guardian (UK)
February 14th, 2010
Canada, faced with growing political pressure over the extraction of oil from its highly polluting tar sands, has begun courting China and other Asian countries to exploit the resource. The move comes as US firms are turning away from tar sands because of its heavy carbon footprint and damage to the landscape.

NIGERIA: Ex-militant leader heads SPDC’s patrol team
by Chris EjimNigerian Compass
January 8th, 2010
Authorities of Shell Petroleum Development Company (SPDC) have unveiled a new security strategy for securing oil pipelines and platforms within the Niger Delta region. Shell has appointed former MEND militant commander, Eris Paul, and his company, Eristex Pipeline Patrol, to secure oil facilities in the Southern Ijaw area of the Delta.

GHANA: Corruption probe into sale of Ghana oil block
by William Wallis, Martin Arnold and Brooke MastersFinancial Times
January 7th, 2010
US and Ghanaian authorities are investigating corruption allegations involving a Texas oil company and the local partner that helped it secure control of the Ghanaian oil block that yielded one of Africa’s biggest recent discoveries. The case risks complicating efforts by Texas company Kosmos to sell its stake in the Jubilee oil field to ExxonMobil in a deal valued at $4bn.

US: Judge dismisses all charges in Blackwater shooting
by Associated PressLos Angeles Times
December 31st, 2009
A federal judge has dismissed all charges against five Blackwater Worldwide security guards charged in a deadly Baghdad shooting.

CHINA: Earth-Friendly Elements, Mined Destructively
by Keith BradsherNew York Times
December 26th, 2009
Some of the greenest technologies of the age, from electric cars to efficient light bulbs to very large wind turbines, are made possible by an unusual group of elements called rare earths. Most of these come from China. “In many places, the mining is abused,” said Wang Caifeng, the top rare-earths industry regulator at the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology in China.

AFGHANISTAN: Lost in Limbo: Injured Afghan Translators Struggle to Survive
by Pratap ChatterjeeProPublica
December 17th, 2009
Local translators are hidden casualties of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. The U.S. military uses defense contractors to hire local residents to serve as translators for the troops. These local translators often live, sleep and eat with soldiers. And yet when they are wounded, they are often ignored by the U.S. system designed to provide them medical care and disability benefits, according to an investigation by the Los Angeles Times and ProPublica.

AFGHANISTAN: Paying Off the Warlords, Anatomy of an Afghan Culture of Corruption
by Pratap ChatterjeeTomDispatch.com
November 17th, 2009
Among the dozens of businesses with lucrative Afghan and U.S. taxpayer-financed reconstruction deals are two extremely well connected companies -- Ghazanfar and Zahid Walid -- that helped to swell the election coffers of President Hamid Karzai as well as the family business of his running mate, the country's new vice president, warlord Mohammed Qasim Fahim.

US/ECUADOR: New nonprofit uses Web to pressure Chevron
by David A. BakerSan Francisco Chronicle
November 16th, 2009
Retired retail executive Richard Goldman was astonished when he heard about the $27 billion pollution lawsuit against Chevron Corp. in Ecuador. SO he has created a nonprofit group, Ethos Alliance, that will use social-networking tools to spread word of the case and put pressure on Chevron.

FRANCE: France jails 'Angolagate' power players
by Pascale JuilliardThe Times Online (South Africa)
October 27th, 2009
A French court slapped jail terms Tuesday on the main players in a network that smuggled arms to war-torn Angola and included an ex-minister and the son of the late president Francois Mitterrand.

BRAZIL: Giants in Cattle Industry Agree to Help Fight Deforestation
by Alexei BarrionuevoNew York Times
October 7th, 2009
Environmental groups hailed a decision this week by four of the world’s largest meat producers to ban the purchase of cattle from newly deforested areas of Brazil’s Amazon rain forest. Brazil has the world’s largest cattle herd and is the world’s largest beef exporter. It is also the fourth largest producer of greenhouse gas emissions.

ECUADOR: Chevron Offers Evidence in Ecuador Bribery Case
by ReutersNew York Times
September 7th, 2009
On Monday Chevron said it gave Ecuadorean authorities evidence of a bribery scheme linked to a $27 billion environmental damages lawsuit against the oil company. Last week, the judge hearing the case, Juan Núñez, recused himself. The Amazon Defense Coalition said the recusal did not “change the overwhelming evidence against Chevron.”

US: Despite Slump, U.S. Role as Top Arms Supplier Grows
by Thom ShankerNew York Times
September 6th, 2009
Despite a recession that knocked down global arms sales last year, the United States expanded its role as the world’s leading weapons supplier, increasing its share to more than two-thirds of all foreign armaments deals, according to a new Congressional study.

FIJI: Fiji Water: Spin the Bottle
by Anna LenzerMother Jones
August 17th, 2009
Obama sips it. Paris Hilton loves it. Mary J. Blige won't sing without it. How did a plastic water bottle, imported from a military dictatorship thousands of miles away, become the epitome of cool?

SOUTH AMERICA: Plundering the Amazon
by Michael Smith and Adriana BrasileiroBloomberg.com
August 16th, 2009
Alcoa and Cargill have bypassed laws designed to prevent destruction of the world’s largest rain forest, Brazilian prosecutors say. The damage wrought by scores of companies is robbing the earth of its best shield against global warming.

UK: Two men and a website mount vendetta against an oil giant
by  Danny FortsonSunday Times (UK)
July 19th, 2009
In Colchester, Essex, John and Alfred Donovan are compiling perhaps the world's largest dossier on Royal Dutch Shell, at royaldutchshellplc.com. It's an awkward position for Shell, this month crowned by Fortune magazine as the world’s largest company, as trying to shut the website down would draw even more attention to it.

UK: Two men and a website mount vendetta against an oil giant
by Danny FortsonThe Sunday Times (UK)
July 19th, 2009
In Colchester, Essex, John and Alfred Donovan are compiling perhaps the world's largest dossier on Royal Dutch Shell, at royaldutchshellplc.com. It's an awkward position for Shell, this month crowned by Fortune magazine as the world’s largest company, as trying to shut the website down would draw even more attention to it.

TANZANIA: The human cost of gold: And a deadly price to pay
This Day Tanzania
June 30th, 2009
Villagers living near a gold mine owned and run by Canada’s Barrick Gold Corp. in Tarime District, Mara Region are demanding the immediate closure of the project, saying they are paying a deadly price for the mining activities in the area.

ECUADOR: Chevron's Amazon 'fake cleanup' trial
United Press International
June 25th, 2009
A report submitted this week to a court in Ecuador finding dangerous levels of contamination at oil wells Chevron says it cleaned up in the 1990s is expected to reinforce a fraud indictment against two Chevron lawyers in a $27.3 billion environmental lawsuit against the oil company.

AFRICA: Blood diamond scheme 'is failing'
BBC News
June 24th, 2009
Officials are meeting to review the Kimberley Process, amid criticism that the scheme, set up to certify the origin of diamonds to assure consumers that by purchasing diamonds they are not financing war and human rights abuses, is failing. The Kimberley Process emerged from global outrage over conflicts in countries like Liberia and Sierra Leone, largely funded by the plundering of diamond resources.

IRAN: Iran's Web Spying Aided By Western Technology
by Christopher Rhoads and Loretta ChaoWall Street Journal
June 22nd, 2009
The Iranian regime has developed one of the world's most sophisticated mechanisms for controlling and censoring the Internet. The Iranian government appears to be engaging in a practice often called deep packet inspection. The monitoring capability was provided, at least in part, by a joint venture of Siemens AG, the German conglomerate, and Nokia Corp., the Finnish cellphone company.

CHINA: China Disables Some Google Functions
by Edward WongNew York Times
June 19th, 2009
After meeting with managers of the Chinese operations of Google on Thursday to warn them, the Chinese government disabled some search functions on the Chinese-language Web site of Google on Friday. Officials alleged the site was linking too often to pornographic and vulgar content.

Companies lobby (quietly) on Armenia genocide bill
by Stephen SingerAssociated Press
June 13th, 2009
In an effort to keep business ties with Turkey, five military contractors and one energy company (Chevron) lobby against a U.S. bill that would label Turkey's slaugther of a million Aremnians during WWI genocide.

NIGERIA: Shell to Pay $15.5 Million to Settle Nigerian Case
by Jad MouawadNew York Times
June 8th, 2009
Royal Dutch Shell agreed to pay $15.5 million to settle a case accusing it of taking part in human rights abuses in the Niger Delta, a striking sum given it has denied any wrongdoing. Ken Saro-Wiwa, Shell’s most prominent critic at the time in Nigeria, was hanged in 1995 by that country’s military regime after protesting Shell's environmental practices in the oil-rich delta, especially in his native Ogoni region.

GHANA: Energy groups lured by Ghana’s Kosmos
by Carola HoyosFinancial Times
June 4th, 2009
Big international energy groups and state-owned oil companies from China and India are circling Kosmos Energy for its Ghanaian oilfield assets, which have been valued at $3bn-$6bn by analysts. The sale could open an oil corridor off the west African coast, stretching as far north-west as Sierra Leone.

'We need a World Court of Human Rights' – UN expert tells Commonwealth
The Commonwealth
June 3rd, 2009
Multinational corporations suspected of abusing human rights should face the full force of international law through trial by a new global court, according to the United Nations’ authority on human rights and counter-terrorism.

US: Chevron annual meeting heats up over Ecuador suit
by Jordan RobertsonWashington Post
May 27th, 2009
In a combative and sometimes colorful annual meeting, Chevron's CEO and chairman exchanged barbs with activists over pollution in the Amazon rain forest and the company's human rights record. The nation's second-largest oil company is awaiting a verdict from a judge in Ecuador that could come with a $27 billion price tag.

EUROPE: Greenpeace warns on Shell oil sands projects
by Carola HoyosFinancial Times
May 18th, 2009
A study by Greenpeace and several other environmental groups has concluded that Royal Dutch Shell's carbon intensity will rise 85 per cent as it develops its oil and gas fields in the coming years. Campaigners warn Shell’s investors that this disadvantages the company vis a vis its peers as US and European policymakers move towards a broad cap-and-trade system to limit carbon emissions. Shell’s growing carbon intensity stems from its resource base, which is heavily made up of Canadian oil and Nigerian gas.

UK: Shell faces investor fury over pay, pollution and human rights
by Terry MacalisterThe Guardian
May 17th, 2009

WORLD: When Chevron Hires Ex-Reporter to Investigate Pollution, Chevron Looks Good
by Brian StelterNew York Times
May 10th, 2009
When Chevron learned that “60 Minutes” was preparing a potentially damaging report about oil company contamination of the Amazon rain forest in Ecuador, it hired a former journalist to produce a mirror image of the report, from the corporation’s point of view. An Ecuadorean judge is expected to rule soon on whether Chevron owes up to $27 billion in damages.

NIGERIA: A Writer’s Violent End, and His Activist Legacy
by Patricia CohenNew York Times
May 4th, 2009
A new novel, "Eclipse," by Richard North Patterson, is based on the case of the Nigerian writer and activist Ken Saro-Wiwa, executed in November 1995 by the government of General Sani Abacha. The circumstances, along with related incidents of brutal attacks, are getting another hearing. This month the Wiwa family’s lawsuit against Royal Dutch Shell over its role in those events goes to trial in federal court in Manhattan.

IRAN/CHINA: Iranians and Others Outwit Net Censors
by John MarkoffNew York Times
April 30th, 2009
The Internet is no longer just an essential channel for commerce, entertainment and information. It has also become a stage for state control — and rebellion against it. Computers are becoming more crucial in global conflicts, not only in spying and military action, but also in determining what information reaches people around the globe.

UK: Use of Web Tracking Tool Raises Privacy Issue in Britain
by Kevin J. O'BrienNew York Times
April 14th, 2009
The European Commission threatened Britain with sanctions on Tuesday for allowing use of a new advertising technology, created by Phorm, to track the Web movements of customers. The country’s largest service provider, BT, acknowledged last April that it used the tool without customers’ consent in 2006 and 2007.

US: Prison company to pay $42.5 million in beating death
by John MacCormackSan Antonio Express News
April 8th, 2009
In a searing opinion, the 13th Court of Appeals has upheld $42.5 million in punitive damages against private prison operator Wackenhut Corrections Corp., now the Geo Group,for the “horrific and gruesome death” of inmate Gregorio De La Rosa Jr. in 2001.

US/NIGERIA: Shell: corporate impunity goes on trial
by George MonbiotThe Guardian
April 7th, 2009
Multinationals accused of human rights abuses can no longer feel safe now that the oil giant is facing allegations of complicity in the execution of Nigerian activist Ken Saro-Wiwa.

US: Oil Giants Loath to Follow Obama’s Green Lead
by Jad MouawadNew York Times
April 7th, 2009
The Obama administration seeks the most ambitious transformation of energy policy in a generation. But Big Oil is not on board. Royal Dutch Shell said last month that it would freeze research and investments in wind, solar and hydrogen power, and focus its alternative energy efforts on biofuels. BP, a company that has spent nine years saying it was moving “beyond petroleum,” has been getting back to petroleum since 2007, paring back its renewable program. The list goes on.

US/NIGERIA: Shell in court over alleged role in Nigeria executions
by Nick MathiasonThe Guardian (UK)
April 5th, 2009
Family of environmental activist Ken Saro-Wiwa, hanged by his country's rulers in 1995, take oil giant to court in New York.

IRAQ: Ex-Blackwater Workers May Return to Iraq Jobs
by Rod NordlandNew York Times
April 3rd, 2009
Late last month Blackwater Worldwide lost its billion-dollar contract to protect American diplomats in Iraq, but by next month many of its private security guards will be back on the job here. The same individuals will just be wearing new uniforms, working for Triple Canopy, the firm that won the State Department’s new contract.

UK: Residents challenge Google camera
BBC News Online
April 3rd, 2009
Google's Street View mapping project ran into local opposition in England, with angry residents in the village of Milton Keynes blocking a Google driver when he started taking photographs of their homes. Villagers accused the company of going too far, violating their privacy and possibly facilitating crime.

US/CANADA: Alaskan lake’s fate could echo across continent
by Todd WilkinsonChristian Science Monitor
March 24th, 2009
A landmark legal case now before the US Supreme Court holds huge implications for lakes across the continent. Nearly four decades the Clean Water Act was passed to protect waterways from industrial pollution, a proposal by Coeur d’Alene Mines Corp. to dispose of tons of effluent in Alaska's Lower Slate Lake has sparked an international debate.

CHILE: Chilean Town Withers in Free Market for Water
by Alexei BarrionuevoNew York Times
March 15th, 2009
Nowhere is the system for buying and selling water more permissive than in Chile, where water rights are private property, not a public resource, and can be traded like commodities with little government oversight or safeguards for the environment. The small town of Quillaga is being swallowed up in the country’s intensifying water wars.

UGANDA/IRAQ: Why 10,000 Ugandans are eagerly serving in Iraq
by Max DelanyChristian Science Monitor
March 6th, 2009
Hired out to multibillion-dollar companies for hundreds of dollars a month, 10,000 Ugandans risk their lives seeking fortunes protecting US Army bases, airports, and oil firms in Iraq for as little as $600 per month. Many are looking to go to Afghanistan as the Obama administration increases contracts there.

ECUADOR/CANADA: Canadian Mining Firm Financed Violence in Ecuador: Lawsuit
by Jennifer MooreTyee Online
March 3rd, 2009
Three villagers from the valley of Intag in northwestern Ecuador are suing Copper Mesa Mining Corporation and the Toronto Stock Exchange. They allege not enough has been done to reduce the risk of harm being faced by farmers and community leaders who have faced violent threats and attacks for opposition to a large open-pit copper mine in their pristine cloud forests.

US: 70 Youths Sue Former Judges in Detention Kickback Case
by Ian UrbinaNew York Times
February 26th, 2009
More than 70 juveniles and their families filed a class-action lawsuit Thursday against two former judges who pleaded guilty this month in a scheme that involved their taking kickbacks to put young offenders in privately run detention centers. The two privately operated centers are run by PA Child Care and Western PA Child Care.

MEXICO: U.S. Is Arms Bazaar for Mexican Cartels
by James C. McKinley, Jr.New York Times
February 25th, 2009
Phoenix-based gun dealer George Iknadosian of X-Calibur Guns will go on trial on charges he sold hundreds of weapons, mostly AK-47 rifles, to smugglers, knowing they would go to a drug cartel in the western state of Sinaloa. The guns helped fuel the gang warfare in which more than 6,000 Mexicans died last year.

TANZANIA: Intruders attempt to seize North Mara mine
Guardian (Tanzania)
December 13th, 2008
A person was shot dead when thousands of gold seekers invaded Barrick`s North Mara Gold Mine in Tarime District and destroyed equipment worth 15 million US dollars.

TANZANIA: Villagers storm Barrick gold mine: Inflict much damage, FFU police deployed to disperse them
This Day (Tanzania)
December 13th, 2008
Thousands of villagers raided the North Mara gold mine owned by Barrick Gold Corp on Thursday night and caused damage to various mining equipments worth more than $16 million (approx. 21bn/-).

US: Plea by Blackwater Guard Helps Indict Others
by GINGER THOMPSON and JAMES RISENNew York Times
December 9th, 2008
On Monday, the Justice Department unsealed its case against five Blackwater private security guards, built largely around testimony from a sixth guard about the 2007 shootings that left 17 unsuspecting Iraqi civilians dead at a busy Baghdad traffic circle.

US/IRAQ: Indiana guardsmen sue defense contractor KBR
by Farah StockmanBoston Globe
December 4th, 2008
Sixteen Indiana national guardsmen filed a lawsuit yesterday against military contractor KBR. The complaint alleges that several reservists contracted respiratory system tumors and skin rashes after guarding reconstruction work at the Qarmat Ali treatment plant, strewn with the toxin chromium dichromate.

WORLD: Workforce deaths at Shell higher than for other western oil groups
by Ed CrooksFinancial Times
December 1st, 2008
Royal Dutch Shell last year suffered more workforce deaths than any other large western oil company. Two employees and 28 contractors were killed working for Shell in 2007. Nine of last year's deaths were in Nigeria, with two people killed in attacks on Shell facilities, and 10 in Russia.

CHILE: Nearly 2,000 Carrying H.I.V. in Chile Were Not Notified
by PASCALE BONNEFOY and ALEXEI BARRIONUEVO The New York Times
November 13th, 2008
Chile’s health minister said Thursday that the country’s public health system had failed to notify at least 512 people that they were infected with H.I.V., and that private-sector services did not inform an additional 1,364 that they were carrying the virus, which causes AIDS.

CHILE: Native Community in Desert Oasis Threatened by Mines
by Daniela EstradaInter Press News Service (IPS)
October 9th, 2008
The Diaguita indigenous community in Huasco Alto, surrounded by rich gold, silver and copper deposits in the northern Chilean region of Atacama, are engaged in a struggle to prevent mining projects from infringing on their territory and destroying their way of life and ancestral identity.

ISRAEL: U.S.-Israel jet deal sought: Pentagon backs sale of next-generation F-35s fighters to ally
by Stephen ManningChicago Tribune
October 2nd, 2008
The Defense Department said this week that it wants to sell as many as 75 fighter jets to Israel in a $15.2 billion deal for the aircraft expected to be the mainstay of air power in the United States and several other nations for decades.

CANADA: High stakes in Canada’s vast oil-sands fields
by George TombsChristian Science Monitor
September 30th, 2008
Trillions of dollars’ worth of oil are present, but the environmental costs are high, too – and growing.

IVORY COAST: Pollution trial opens in Ivory Coast
Agence France Press (AFP)
September 29th, 2008
The trial opened in Ivory Coast on Monday of 12 people charged with involvement in a 2006 toxic waste scandal which killed 17 Ivorians and poisoned thousands.

SOUTH AFRICA: Apartheid lawsuit back in US court
SABC News
September 25th, 2008
After six years of battling, the plaintiffs must prove whether certain multinationals enabled the apartheid government to commit acts of gross human rights violations. Among the 21 defendants are oil, vehicle and financial companies which continue to operate in South Africa -- the likes of BP, Shell, Chevron Texaco, Barclays, Daimler Chrysler and Rio Tinto. They stand accused of supporting the former regime with arms and ammunition, financing, fuel, transportation and military technology.

CONGO: Candidates Silent On Resource War In Congo
by Georgianne NienaberHuffington Post
September 25th, 2008
All politics is local, to paraphrase the venerable Bostonian and Democratic, Tip O'Neill. To human rights workers, journalists, writers, and humanitarians who have intimate knowledge of the Great Lakes Region of Equatorial Africa, this short email conjures a place, people, and tragedy that has been met with a wall of silence on the campaign trail. Neither John McCain nor Barack Obama has addressed this great humanitarian breakdown, except in the context of political squabbling.

IVORY COAST: Ivory Coast workers can't sue firms in U.S.
by Bob EgelkoSan Francisco Chronicle
September 25th, 2008
Ivory Coast plantation workers who claim they were sterilized by a U.S.-made pesticide can't sue the manufacturers and distributors of the chemical in the United States because they can't show the companies intended to harm them, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday.

WORLD: Oil Companies' "Self-Policing" a Dismal Failure
by Alison RaphaelInter Press News Service (IPS)
September 24th, 2008
The intersection of human rights, the environment and corporate responsibility was highlighted today at a Capitol Hill hearing featuring activists from Burma and Nigeria who underlined the failure to date of "voluntary" controls over major oil companies operating in their countries.

COLOMBIA: To die for
by Mark ThomasGuardian (UK)
September 20th, 2008
Being a trade union organiser in bottling plants used by Coca-Cola in Colombia is a dangerous business - they are prime targets for death squads. Can Coke be held responsible? Mark Thomas follows the trail from Bogotá to New York

INDIA: India Grapples With How to Convert Its Farmland Into Factories
by Somini SenguptaNew York Times
September 17th, 2008
On the eve of opening a new auto factory in West Bengal, arranged via secret contract with the government, Indian industrial giant Tata is facing massive protests by local farmers determined not to be pushed off their land.

ECUADOR: Chevron lawyers indicted in pollution case
by David BakerSan Francisco Chronicle
September 13th, 2008
Two Chevron Corp. lawyers fighting a landmark pollution lawsuit in Ecuador have been indicted by that country's prosecutor general, a move the company says proves the government is trying to tamper with the suit.

GEORGIA: US military trained Georgian commandos
by Charles Clover in Moscow and Demetri Sevastopulo in WashingtonFinancial Times
September 5th, 2008
The US military provided combat training to 80 Georgian special forces commandos only months prior to Georgia’s army assault in South Ossetia in August.

US: Files Show Governor Intervened With Court
by Ian UrbinaNew York Times
August 13th, 2008
West Virginia Governor Joe Manchin III filed a friend-of-the-court brief in June, arguing the State Supreme Court should review a $382 million judgment against DuPont. The case involves thousands of residents in the area of a DuPont-operated zinc-smelting plant, and the largest civil penalty ever levied against the company, for the dumping of toxic arsenic, cadmium and lead at the plant.

INDIA: Decades Later, Toxic Sludge Torments Bhopal
by Somini SenguptaNew York Times
July 7th, 2008
Residents of Bhopal, India continue to suffer from Union Carbide's toxic legacy, this time in the form of toxic waste that still languishes inside a shoddy warehouse on the old factory grounds. Ailments such as cleft palates and mental retardation are appearing in numbers of Bhopali children, raising questions about contaminated soil and groundwater, clean-up, and liability.

US: Put oil firm chiefs on trial, says leading climate change scientist
by Ed PilkingtonGuardian (UK)
June 23rd, 2008
On June 23, James Hansen, a leading world climate scientist, called for the executives of major fossil fuel companies, including ExxonMobil and Peabody Energy, to be put on trial for crimes against humanity and nature through actions like funding climate skeptics to undermine global consensus around combating climate change.

US: Workers on Hunger Strike Say They Were Misled on Visas
by JULIA PRESTONThe New York Times
June 7th, 2008
The Indian workers say they were deceived by Signal International and labor recruiters when they paid as much as $20,000 for visas they believed would allow them to work and live permanently with their families in the United States. In fact, the H-2B visas are for short-term contracts.

NETHERLANDS: Nigerians seek damages from Shell over pollution
by Arthur MaxBusiness Week
May 14th, 2008
Four Nigerian villagers and the environmental group Friends of the Earth are demanding Shell take responsibility for damage from oil leaks caused by its Nigerian subsidiary, lawyers said Wednesday.

CHINA: In China City, Protesters See Pollution Risk of New Plant
by Edward WongNew York Times
May 6th, 2008
Residents took to the streets of Chengdu to protest a $5.5 billion ethylene plant under construction by PetroChina, reflecting a surge in environmental awareness by urban, middle-class Chinese determined to protect their health and the value of their property.

INDONESIA: Indonesia's Commodity Boom Is a Mixed Bag
by Tom WrightWall Street Journal
March 24th, 2008
Indonesia's economy is riding the recent wave of high global commodity prices. But local pressure is arising towards steel makers and power producers in China and India who have diverted coal supplies abroad by locking in 20-year supply contracts with Indonesian miners.

US: Workers Sue Gulf Coast Company That Imported Them
by ADAM NOSSITERThe New York Times
March 11th, 2008
A group of 500 foreign welders and pipefitters brought in to work at Gulf Coast oil rig yards after Hurricane Katrina said Monday that they had sued their employer, claiming they were lured with false promises of permanent-resident status, forced to live in inhumane conditions and then threatened when they protested.

CHINA: Solar Energy Firms Leave Waste Behind in China
by Ariana Eunjung ChaWashington Post
March 9th, 2008
The Luoyang Zhonggui High-Technology Co. of Henan, China, is a green energy company, producing polysilicon for solar energy panels. But the byproduct -- silicon tetrachloride -- is a highly toxic substance that poses environmental hazards.

BRAZIL: King of soya: environmental vandal or saviour of the world's poor?
by Rory Carroll and Tom PhillipsGuardian (UK)
March 3rd, 2008
Erai Maggi's company Bom Futuro produces more than 600,000 tonnes of soya a year, most of it to feed livestock ending up as meat in China and Europe, and generating £175m in revenue. Critics decry the link between increasing soya production and Amazon deforestation.

UGANDA: Privatization of Seeds Moving Apace
by Aileen KwaIPS
February 21st, 2008
The Ugandan parliament will soon have a hearing on the draft Plant Variety Protection Bill, approved by the cabinet early last year. According to an inside government source, seeds companies including Monsanto have been lobbying for such intellectual property protection.

KAZAKHSTAN: Kazakhs warn Mittal over safety
by Isabel Gorst in Moscow and Peter Marsh in LondonThe Financial Times Limited 2008
February 19th, 2008
Kazakhstan has warned ArcelorMittal, the world’s biggest steel company, that it could be forced to close one of its coal mines if it does not improve safety following an explosion last month that killed 30 people.

US: Court dismisses lawsuit on secret kidnapping
by Adam TannerReuters
February 14th, 2008
A federal judge, saying the case involved a state secret, dismissed a lawsuit on Wednesday against a unit of Boeing Co that charged the firm helped fly terrorism suspects abroad to secret prisons.

US: Limbo for U.S. Women Reporting Iraq Assaults
by JAMES RISENThe New York Times
February 13th, 2008
Ms. Kineston is among a number of American women who have reported that they were sexually assaulted by co-workers while working as contractors in Iraq but now find themselves in legal limbo, unable to seek justice or even significant compensation.

US-CHINA: Staples cuts ties with APP on environment worry
Reuters
February 8th, 2008
Staples Inc, the largest U.S. office supplies retailer, said on Friday it ceased doing business with Asia Pulp & Paper (APP) late last month because of environmental concerns.

US: CIA Likely Let Contractors Perform Waterboarding
by SIOBHAN GORMANThe Wall Street Journal
February 8th, 2008
The CIA's secret interrogation program has made extensive use of outside contractors, whose role likely included the waterboarding of terrorist suspects, according to testimony yesterday from the CIA director and two other people familiar with the program.

EL SALVADOR: "Life Is Worth More than Gold" Say Anti-Mining Activists
by Raúl GutiérrezInter Press Service (IPS)
February 1st, 2008
Peasant farmers from the northern Salvadoran province of Cabañas fear that mining operations planned for the region will consume 30,000 litres of water a day, drawn from the same sources that currently provide local residents with water only once a week.

PERU: For Peru's Indians, Lawsuit Against Big Oil Reflects a New Era
by Kelly HearnThe Washington Post
January 31st, 2008
Oxy is Occidental Petroleum, the California-based company that pulled a fortune from this rain forest from 1972 to 2000. It is also the company that Maynas and other Achuar leaders now blame for wreaking environmental havoc -- and leaving many of the people here ill.

INDIA: H.P. Case to Go Forward in India
by HEATHER TIMMONSThe New York Times
January 31st, 2008
A decision by India’s highest court may force international companies who outsource business here to do more to guard the safety of local workers.

GLOBAL: False 'Green' Ads Draw Global Scrutiny
by Tom WrightWall Street Journal
January 30th, 2008
With companies eager to tout their "green" credentials to consumers, advertising watchdogs are stepping up efforts to rein in marketers that make false or exaggerated claims.

US: Giuliani Had Ties to Company Trying to Sell Border Technology
by RUSS BUETTNERNew York Times
January 18th, 2008
On the presidential campaign trail, former Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani often promotes the installation of electronic monitoring devices at the border to stem illegal immigration, without mentioning that until a few months ago, he was partner in a company trying to market such technology.

UK: FBI wants instant access to British identity data
by Owen BowcottThe Guardian (UK)
January 15th, 2008
Americans seek international database to carry iris, palm and finger prints

CHILE: Copper Boom - Cui Bono?
by Daniela EstradaIPS News
January 11th, 2008
According to global forecasts, the price of copper, Chile’s main export, will remain high in 2008 thanks to strong demand from China. But just who will benefit from this bonanza is up for debate.

CHINA: In Chinese Factories, Lost Fingers and Low Pay
by DAVID BARBOZANew York Times
January 5th, 2008
Nearly a decade after some of the most powerful companies in the world — often under considerable criticism and consumer pressure — began an effort to eliminate sweatshop labor conditions in Asia, worker abuse is still commonplace in many of the Chinese factories that supply Western companies, according to labor rights groups.

IRAQ: Shame of Imported Labor in Kurdish North of Iraq
by Michael KamberNew York Times
December 29th, 2007
Thousands of foreign workers have come to the Kurdish districts in northern Iraq in the last three years. Many have been deceived by unscrupulous agents who arrange the journeys, like the Bangladesh-based Travel Mix agency.

IRAQ: Sexual Violence: An Occupational Hazard -- In Iraq and at Home
by Marie TessierWomen's Media Center
December 26th, 2007
Jamie Leigh Jones was just 20 in 2005 when she took a leap of faith to work in Iraq for her employer, military contractor Kellogg, Brown & Root, then a subsidiary of Halliburton. She went on a mission she believed in. Shortly after her arrival in Iraq, however, Jones' ambitions were dashed in an alleged gang rape by co-workers.

INDIA: Many rescued child laborers in India soon back at another dismal job
by Heidi J. ShragerChronicle Foreign Service
December 23rd, 2007
A 2006 report by the Child Welfare Committee found that 12 of 22 children from a village in the impoverished eastern state of Bihar were re-trafficked, mostly to different states, within a year after being rescued from a Delhi hand-embroidery sweatshop.

PNG: Govt Warns Public To Stay Away From Barrick Gold's Porgera Mine
by Alexander RheeneyThe Pacific Magazine
December 18th, 2007
The Papua New Guinea government has appealed to the public to keep away from the Porgera gold mine after security guards shot dead an alleged illegal miner.

GLOBAL: Mining Firms Bulk Up, Echoing Big Oil Mergers
by Patrick Barta and Robert Guy MatthewsWall Street Journal
December 18th, 2007
Mining are embarking on another round of deals that promises industry juggernauts with great influence over the cost of raw materials -- and, by extension, the price of consumer electronics, cars and new apartment blocks.

US: Wider Spying Fuels Aid Plan for Telecom Industry
by Eric Lichtblau, James Risen and Scott ShaneNew York Times
December 16th, 2007
The Bush administration is waging a high-profile campaign to persuade Congress to pass legislation protecting companies from lawsuits for aiding the National Security Agency's warrantless eavesdropping program. At stake is the federal government's partnership with industry to conduct a wide range of secret surveillance operations in fighting terrorism and crime.

US: Senator Says Wal-Mart Sells Products From Sweatshops
by ReutersNew York Times
December 13th, 2007
A Democratic senator said Wednesday that Christmas tree ornaments sold at Wal-Mart Stores and other major retailers were made in a Chinese sweatshop.

CANADA: Gov't Urged to Rein in Mining Sector
by Am JohalIPS News
December 7th, 2007
Canadian mining companies continue to come under scrutiny from civil society organisations for international human rights violations and environmental damage that critics say the Canadian government has done little to check.

US: Shoshone Use Film, Courts to Fight Barrick Gold Mine on Sacred Land
by Lisa J. WolfEnviroment News Service
December 6th, 2007
"Our Land, Our Life," a 74 minute documentary directed by George and Beth Gage, details Carrie and Mary Dann's 30 year struggle to protect their traditional ways and ancestral lands from mining degradation in a battle that went to the U.S. Supreme Court and beyond to the United Nations with no relief as yet from the U.S. government.

IVORY COAST: The Bitter Taste of Cocoa in Côte d'Ivoire
by Michael DeibertIPS News
December 3rd, 2007
In addition to funding conflict, cocoa revenues are believed to have been defrauded for enrichment of persons in both the government and rebel camps. Article also mentions the following corporations: Lev-Ci and Cargill.

COLOMBIA: Victims of Colombian Conflict Sue Chiquita Brands
New York Times
November 14th, 2007
Victims of Colombia’s civil conflict sued the banana importer Chiquita Brands International yesterday, accusing it of making payments to a paramilitary group responsible for thousands of killings.

US: Intel official: Say goodbye to privacy
by Pamela Hess Associated Press
November 11th, 2007
Privacy no longer can mean anonymity, says Donald Kerr, the principal deputy director of national intelligence. Instead, it should mean that government and businesses properly safeguards people's private communications and financial information.

DRC: Six arrested in Congo radioactive dumping scandal
by Joe BavierReuters
November 10th, 2007
Congolese authorities arrested six people in connection with the dumping of tonnes of highly radioactive minerals into a river near the southeastern town of Likasi. A report said some 17 tons of the minerals confiscated were destined for Chinese firm Magma.

US: Toxins Threaten to Uproot Entire Town
by Mark WeisenmillerIPS News
November 5th, 2007
The mostly African American citizens of a small town in rural Florida suffer severely because of a beryllium leak at a Lockheed Martin-owned plant.

US: BP fined $373m by US government
BBC News
October 26th, 2007
Oil giant BP has been fined a total of $373m (£182m) by the US Department of Justice for environmental crimes and committing fraud.

US: US lawmakers plan squeeze on Chevron in Myanmar
AFP
October 24th, 2007
Proposed sanctions introduced in the US House of Representatives would pressure US energy giant Chevron to pull its investment from Myanmar, which rights activists say is helping prop up the ruling military junta.

RUSSIA: Siberian boom threatens traditions
by Tom EsslemontBBC News
October 8th, 2007
Russia is forging ahead with ambitious energy projects in eastern Siberia, but the indigenous Evenk people are complaining that their age-old way of life is in danger.

BURMA: Criticism of Total Operations Grows
by Michael DiebertIPS
October 4th, 2007
The Yadana natural gas pipeline runs through the heart of the debate on corporate responsibility as to how foreign businesses should operate in a country ruled by a military dictatorship accused of widespread human rights abuses and violent suppression of dissent within its borders.

CONGO: World Bank accused of razing Congo forests
by John VidalThe Guardian (UK)
October 4th, 2007
The World Bank encouraged foreign companies to destructively log the world's second largest forest, endangering the lives of thousands of Congolese Pygmies, according to a report on an internal investigation by senior bank staff and outside experts.

BURMA: Total says pulling out would raise hardship
by Ed CrooksFinancial Times
September 28th, 2007
Total of France, which operates a natural gas project in Burma, has expressed its "deep concern" over the situation in the country but rejected the idea it should pull out.

FRANCE: Total: No Capital Expenditures in Myanmar
Associated Press
September 27th, 2007
Total SA, reacting Thursday to comments by French President Sarkozy urging the oil and gas giant to refrain from new investment in Myanmar, said it had not made any capital expenditure there since 1998. The military junta that rules Myanmar this week escalated its efforts to repress pro-democracy demonstrations led by thousands of Buddhist monks.

IRAQ: Iraqi Report Says Blackwater Guards Fired First
by Sabrina Tavernise and James GlanzNew York Times
September 19th, 2007
A preliminary Iraqi report says that Blackwater security guards needlessly fired at a car, killing a couple and their infant.

US: Families Cannot Sue Firm for Israel Deaths
by Ed PilkingtonGuardian (London)
September 19th, 2007
The parents of Rachel Corrie, the US peace activist who was crushed to death four years ago in the then Israeli-occupied Gaza as she was protesting against the demolition of Palestinian homes, have been refused permission to sue the company which made the bulldozer that killed her.

US: U.S. Contractor Banned by Iraq Over Shootings
by Sabrina TaverniseNew York Times
September 18th, 2007
Blackwater USA, an American contractor that provides security to some of the top American officials in Iraq, has been banned from working in the country by the Iraqi government after a shooting that left eight Iraqis dead and involved an American diplomatic convoy.

CHINA: An Opportunity for Wall St. in China’s Surveillance Boom
by Keith BradsherNew York Times
September 11th, 2007
China Security and Surveillance Technology, a fast-growing company that installs and sometimes operates surveillance systems for Chinese police agencies, jails and banks, has just been approved for a listing on the New York Stock Exchange. The company’s listing is just a sign of ever-closer ties among Wall Street, surveillance companies and the Chinese government’s security apparatus.

CHINA: U.S. Group Accuses Chinese Toy Factories of Labor Abuses
by David Barboza New York Times
August 21st, 2007
A workers’ rights group in the United States released a report on Tuesday detailing what it called brutal conditions and illegal practices in Chinese toy factories, many of which supply some of the world’s biggest brand-name toy makers, including Walt Disney and Hasbro.

INDIA: Indian Activists' Rising Clout
by Jackie RangeWall Street Journal
August 16th, 2007
India's Supreme Court is poised to decide whether a British company has the right to mine in a sacred tribal forest, a case that underlines the complexity of undertaking large-scale industrial projects here. The case's hearing by the court reflects the growing clout of activist groups in India.

INDIA: Novartis Patents Case Far From Dead
by Praful BidwaiInter Press Service News Agency
August 9th, 2007
Cancer patients in India have reason to be relieved at a high court ruling this week which dismissed a petition by Swiss pharmaceuticals multinational corporation (MNC) Novartis challenging an Indian law which denies patents for minor or trivial improvements to known drugs.

US: Boeing unit subject of refiled CIA-flight suit
by Bloomberg NewsChicago Tribune
August 2nd, 2007
A Boeing Co. unit falsified flight plans to disguise the Central Intelligence Agency's transporting of terrorism suspects to secret prisons overseas, the American Civil Liberties Union claims in an updated lawsuit.

COLOMBIA: Suing Multinationals Over Murder
by Ken StierTIME Magazine
August 1st, 2007
Organized labor often complains of its treatment at the hands of corporate America, but its accusations pale in comparison to those made recently by the widows of Colombian mine workers in an Alabama courtroom. During a two-week trial, a Birmingham jury weighed charges that the local Drummond Coal Company bore responsibility for the murders of three union leaders who represented workers at its Colombian mine - the world's largest open pit mine.

MEXICO: Thousands of Unpaid Teens Bag Groceries for Wal-Mart
by Joseph ContrerasNewsweek
August 1st, 2007
Wal-Mart prides itself on cutting costs at home and abroad, and its Mexican operations are no exception. Wal-Mart is Mexico's largest private-sector employer in the nation today, with nearly 150,000 local residents on its payroll. An additional 19,000 youngsters between the ages of 14 and 16 work after school in hundreds of Wal-Mart stores, mostly as grocery baggers, throughout Mexico-and none of them receives a red cent in wages or fringe benefits.

CHINA: Beijing Games Officials Penalize Firms
by Mei FongThe Wall Street Journal
August 1st, 2007
The Beijing Olympic Organizing Committee said it was taking corrective measures after a monthlong investigation found that four factories making Olympic merchandise were guilty of labor violations.

BRITAIN: Brown unveils global anti-poverty drive
by Jean EagleshamFinancial Times
August 1st, 2007
Gordon Brown yesterday unveiled a "moral" alliance of leaders of governments and multinationals to tackle global poverty, telling the United Nations that globalisation could be a force for justice.

US: Blackwater supports inquiry into fatal shooting
by Bill SizemoreVirginian-Pilot
July 25th, 2007
After one of his personal bodyguards was shot to death by a Blackwater USA security contractor last Christmas Eve, Iraqi Vice President Adil Abdul-Mahdi assured the U.S. ambassador that he was trying to keep the incident out of the public eye.

COLOMBIA: Drummond Union: Govt Muffles Key Witness
by Frank BajakForbes.com
July 24th, 2007
The union activists suing U.S. coal company Drummond Co. Inc. in Alabama in the 2001 murders of three labor leaders say deliberate foot-dragging by Colombian authorities is preventing the jury from hearing their star witness. Concerned by the delay, 12 Democrats in the U.S. Congress wrote Colombia's vice president last week asking him to intercede.

CHILE: Gold rush threatens glacier
by Lucia Newman Al Jazeera
July 8th, 2007
A new gold rush is under way as mining companies seek to supply the ever-increasing demand for the precious metal from emerging economies such as India, and with reserves dwindling all over the world they are going to extraordinary lengths to extract it.

UN: Global Compact with Business 'Lacks Teeth' - NGOs
by Gustavo CapdevilaInter Press News Service (IPS)
July 6th, 2007
The U.N.'s Global Compact with international big business "at the moment is so voluntary that it really is a happy-go-lucky club," says Ramesh Singh, chief executive of ActionAid, a non-governmental organisation. The controversy has come to a boiling point because of the Global Compact Leaders' Summit being held in Geneva on Thursday and Friday, at which over 1,000 representatives of multinational companies are taking part, in addition to well-known civil society figures like Irene Khan, the secretary general of AI; Mary Robinson, president of the Ethical Globalisation Initiative; Guy Ryder, general secretary of the International Trade Union Confederation; and Jeremy Hobbs, executive director of Oxfam International.

MALAYSIA: Death of a Migrant Worker
by Anil NettoInter Press Service News Agency
June 19th, 2007
False promises of good pay and healthy working conditions fed to Indian migrant workers in Malaysia have led to destitution, physical abuse, and now, it seems, death.

CHINA: Child Labour Scandal Exposes Gross Corruption
by Antoaneta BezlovaInter Press Service News Agency
June 18th, 2007
An unfolding national scandal on the large-scale abuse of child labourers in the brick kiln industry raises questions on the adequacy of planned labour laws that are supposed to take on sweatshops and protect workers' rights.

BURMA: No End to Forced Labour
by Gustavo Capdevila Inter Press Service News Agency
June 15th, 2007
The International Labour Organisation (ILO) expressed profound concern about the persistence of forced labour in Burma, while it is closely monitoring the implementation of a mechanism for victims to file complaints, which was recently agreed with the Southeast Asian country's governing junta.

IRAQ: Caught in Trafficking
by David PhinneyInter Press Service News Agency
June 15th, 2007
A Filipino air conditioner repairman's life was turned upside down when promises of good pay and work in Kuwait were replaced with the harsh realities of corrupt recruiters, horrible living conditions and forced work in Iraq.

CHINA: Child labour caution for China Olympics
by Andrew TaylorFinancial Times
June 10th, 2007
Licensed goods being made for next year’s Beijing Olympic Games are being manufactured by child labour and “sweatshops” in China, the Playfair Alliance says in a report published on Monday.

CHILE: Chile Must Pay US$5.4 Million to Aricans Living Amid Toxic Waste
by Mike HagerThe Santiago Times
June 1st, 2007
In a landmark case, Chile’s Supreme Court ruled this week that the state must compensate 356 residents of two slums in the northern mining city of Arica for health problems brought on by years of exposure to open deposits of toxic waste. Promel, the Swedish company responsible for the importation of the toxic materials, cannot compensate the plaintiffs because the company no longer exists.

NIGERIA: Pfizer Faces Criminal Charges in Nigeria
by Joe StephensWashington Post
May 30th, 2007
Officials in Nigeria have brought criminal charges against pharmaceutical giant Pfizer for the company's alleged role in the deaths of children who received an unapproved drug during a meningitis epidemic.

IRAQ: Death Toll for Contractors Reaches New High in Iraq
by John M. Broder and James RisenNew York Times
May 19th, 2007
Casualties among private contractors in Iraq have soared to record levels this year, setting a pace that seems certain to turn 2007 into the bloodiest year yet for the civilians who work alongside the American military in the war zone, according to new government numbers.

SUDAN: China accused of supporting Sudan rights abuse
Agence France Presse
May 18th, 2007
A leading opponent of a Chinese-financed dam in Sudan accused Beijing on Friday of fueling widespread human rights abuses, as Khartoum moved to relocate 70,000 villagers to make way for the project.

CANADA: Barrick Boss Gets Served
by Amy ChungNow (Toronto)
May 10th, 2007
Protest Barrick, a network of aboriginal communities from Australia, the U.S., Latin America and Asia, converged on Barrick Gold Corporation's shareholder meeting at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre May 2 to serve the company an eviction notice from First Nation land.

CONGO: New row over delay of Congo funds report
by Dino MahtaniFinancial Times
May 8th, 2007
The World Bank has withheld the findings of an inquiry into alleged mismanagement of bank funds in the Democratic Republic of Congo, raising fresh questions about the anti-corruption strategy of Paul Wolfowitz, the bank's president.

BRAZIL: Brazil to break Aids drug patent
BBC
May 4th, 2007
Brazil's president has authorised the country to bypass the patent on an Aids drug manufactured by Merck, a US pharmaceutical giant.

MEXICO: Wackenhut Worries: A company with a sketchy record has quietly taken over deportation duties from the Border Patrol
by Adam BorowitzTuscon Weekly
May 3rd, 2007
Forget about asking questions relating to the transportation of illegal immigrants back to Mexico, because Wackenhut Corporation, which won a government contract to perform this function in the name of the American people, doesn't have to answer them! The daily transportation of thousands of illegal immigrants back into Mexico has been turned over to a private company that was fired last year for botching security at the headquarters of the Department of Homeland Security.

DRC: Vast forests with trees each worth £4,000 sold for a few bags of sugar
by John VidalGuardian Unlimited
April 11th, 2007
· Congo village chiefs not told value of concessions · World Bank blamed over deals causing 'catastrophe'

CANADA: UN Body Holds Canada Responsible for Corporations’ Actions Abroad
by Mark CherringtonCultural Survival
April 10th, 2007
In a groundbreaking decision, the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD) has told Canada that it must rein in Canadian corporations operating on Indian land in the United States.

NIGERIA: Shell to raise Nigerian oil production
by Jad MouawadInternational Herald Tribune
April 4th, 2007
A year after being forced to shut down more than half of its oil output in Nigeria because of militant violence, Royal Dutch Shell said it expected to resume full production within the next "five to six months," after agreeing with local communities that it could safely return to the Niger Delta.

NIGERIA: Shell to raise Nigerian oil production
by Jad MouawadInternational Herald Tribune
April 4th, 2007
A year after being forced to shut down more than half of its oil output in Nigeria because of militant violence, Royal Dutch Shell said it expected to resume full production within the next "five to six months," after agreeing with local communities that it could safely return to the Niger Delta.

CHINA: China union says U.S. fast food chains broke wage law
by John RuwitchReuters
April 4th, 2007
U.S. fast food chains, including McDonald's and KFC, broke minimum wage laws in the southern Chinese city of Guangzhou, the state-backed labor union said on Wednesday, urging tougher enforcement of employment laws.

KOREA: Daewoo-Burma arms trade targetted
Bangkok Post
March 26th, 2007
Protests against Korea's Daewoo corporation for allegedly selling military equipment to Myanmar's army government in exchange for energy contracts took place in 15 countries Monday.

BURMA: Shackles, torture, executions: inside Burma's jungle gulags
by Dan McDougallThe Observer
March 25th, 2007
There is no real dissent here in Rangoon. People are too scared to be members of any democratic movement. We are all just victims, people like me who are trying to get their lives back.' Ko Min, 47, his wife and two sons were swept up with hundreds of others in a military raid on their village close to the city of Bagan in 2005. The family were put to work, clearing jungle, digging latrines and an irrigation system for a military camp outside Mandalay. (mentions Zarubezhneft oil company)

BURMA: Natural Gas Project Threatens Human Rights
Human Rights Watch
March 24th, 2007
South Korean, Indian Investments May Lead to Complicity in Abuses

PERU: Human Rights Commission May Examine Violations at La Oroya, Peru
Earthjustice Legal Fund and CIEL
March 21st, 2007
Public health and environmental organizations from throughout the Western Hemisphere today announced the filing of a petition with the human rights division of the Organization of American States in Washington, D.C. The petition accuses the Peruvian government of doing little to halt contamination from a metallurgical complex that is impacting the lives and health of the citizens of La Oroya, Peru.

COLOMBIA: Colombia May Extradite Chiquita Officials
by Simon RomeroNew York Times
March 19th, 2007
Colombian officials said over the weekend that they would consider seeking the extradition of senior executives of Chiquita Brands International after the company pleaded guilty in United States federal court to making payments to paramilitary death squads.

US: Chevron gets part of suit dismissed
by Elizabeth DouglassLos Angeles Times
March 15th, 2007
A federal judge on Wednesday dismissed a racketeering charge against Chevron Corp. brought by Nigerian villagers who believe the oil giant condoned human rights abuses carried out by the West African nation's militia.

INDIA: Amnesty International Public Statement: Deaths in West Bengal due to police firing during protests against new industrial project
Amnesty International
March 15th, 2007
Amnesty International is deeply concerned at reports of the use of excessive and unnecessary force by police in West Bengal (Eastern India) against farmers protesting proposed displacement by the state government for a new industrial project, which has resulted in deaths of at least 14 persons and injuries.

US: Chevron wins partial dismissal in Nigeria case
Herald Tribune
March 14th, 2007
A federal judge in California threw out a racketeering claim against Chevron Corp. filed by Nigerians who claimed the oil company conspired with the military and police to gun down demonstrators protesting their operations in the African nation.

PHILIPPINES: Court orders removal of oil storage facilities
by Gilbert FelongcoGulf News
March 8th, 2007
Citing threats to the inhabitants of a thickly populated area, the Supreme Court yesterday ordered the removal of three major oil storage facilities in the city.

CANADA: Supermarket chain grabs passports, coerces immigrant workers, suit alleges.
by Tom SandbornThe Tyee
March 5th, 2007
T&T Supermarkets, a chain of specialty food stores serving Asian communities in Canada, stands accused of abusing the rights of foreign workers brought to Canada under a federal program.

US: Lockheed: Health care data off-limits
by Donna WrightBradenton Herald
March 1st, 2007
Spokeswoman says she misunderstood company's policy on free medical plan

ASIA: Charities slam conditions for computer workers
by Frédéric Burnand and Adam BeaumontSwissInfo
February 27th, 2007
Two Swiss charities have sharply criticised labour conditions in Asian factories supplying parts to some of the world's leading computer brands.

ARGENTINA: Mapuches Return to Benetton-Held Land
by Marcela ValenteInter Press News Service (IPS)
February 27th, 2007
Mapuche Indians in the southern Argentine region of Patagonia, who in 2002 took part in a land dispute against the Italian textile group Benetton, have returned to occupy land belonging to the firm, reclaiming their ancestral rights.

HONDURAS: Protests Mount Against Mining Giant
by Stephen LeahyMines & Communities
February 24th, 2007
Dangerous levels of lead and arsenic have been found in the blood of Honduran villagers living downstream from a controversial gold and silver mine owned by Canada's Goldcorp Inc., the world's third largest gold mining firm.

CHINA: Disney sweats over sweatshop charges in China
by Venkatesan VembuDaily News Analysis
February 16th, 2007
Shenzhen supplier shuts shop following campaign against labour standards

CHINA: China's besieged factories: Activists aim to expose unscrupulous labor practices to shame companies
by Craig SimonsAtlanta Journal-Constitution
February 14th, 2007
Lei Huang could be a poster child for China's laboring classes. For each 60-hour week he works on an assembly line for Foxconn, a manufacturer of electronics and computer parts in this south China manufacturing hub, he earns $32 and a bunk in a dormitory room with 19 other laborers.

CONGO: All that glitters...
by Jean-Roger KasekiGuardian (UK)
February 13th, 2007
Decades of gold mining should have given Congo a ticket to prosperity. Instead, it is trapped in a cycle of violence and poverty.

NIGERIA: Oil Spill Displaces 10 Ijaw Communities
by Emma ArubiVanguard (Lagos)
February 13th, 2007
CHEVRON'S Abiteye flow station oil spill of over 1,500 barrels of crude has rendered over 10 Ijaw communities and 500 hundred persons homeless in Gbaramatu kingdom in Warri South West local government area of Delta State.

JAMAICA: Dust, stench and claim of impotence: Pollution killing us, say communities near bauxite plants - Firms insist waste not toxic
by Karyl WalkerJamaica Observer
February 11th, 2007
The approximately US$400 million earned by the bauxite sector last year means nothing to Sandra McLean and other residents of districts surrounding the Alumina Partners of Jamaica (Alpart) refinery in Nain, St Elizabeth.

INDIA: Farmers irked over land acquisition for Reliance's power plant in Ghaziabad
by Shailesh KumarDown to Earth
February 9th, 2007
Farmers continue to protest against Reliance's power project in UP

CHINA: Businesses help China's government abuse rights
by Chang Ching-hsiTaipai Times
February 9th, 2007
Following the onset of reform in 1978, China has become the world's factory. By late February, its foreign exchange reserves had reached a total of US$853.7 billion, surpassing Japan's US$831.6 billion to become the largest in the world. Meanwhile, the human rights of the Chinese people remain severely restricted.

US: Lawsuit accuses Connecticut nursery of human trafficking
by John ChristoffersenAssociated Press
February 8th, 2007
A dozen Guatemalan workers filed a federal lawsuit Thursday accusing one of the nation's largest nurseries of engaging in human trafficking by forcing them to work nearly 80 hours per week, paying them less than minimum wage and denying them medical care for injuries on the job.

PERU: UN Mission Probes Private Security Groups
by Ángel PáezInter Press News Service (IPS)
February 7th, 2007
A priest who provides support for Peruvian farmers in their conflict with a transnational gold mining corporation complained to a United Nations mission that he was under surveillance by a private security company.

PAKISTAN: Child Labour - A crucial goal remains to be scored
by Doug CahnEthical Corporation
February 7th, 2007
Ten years after the signing of the Atlanta Partnership on child labour, what will it take to finally eliminate the practice in the manufacture of footballs? Doug Cahn examines the issues

CHINA: New labor movement afoot in China: Activists employing shame in effort to bring about change.
by Craig SimonsStatesman News Service
February 4th, 2007
Labor rights groups long have documented low pay and strict management in Chinese factories. But as Western firms increasingly move manufacturing to China to cut costs and raise profits, activists are adopting a strategy of publicizing conditions at globally recognized companies including Foxconn, which supplies dozens of international brands such as Apple Inc. from its Shenzhen facilities.

SOUTH AFRICA: MCC stalls new Aids drugs
by Belinda BeresfordMail & Guardian Online
February 3rd, 2007
South Africans have been denied the “biggest advance” in antiretroviral therapy over the last few years because of a lack of urgency in the drug registration process in South Africa, according to the Treatment Action Campaign.

US: Border Policy's Success Strains Resources: Tent City in Texas Among Immigrant Holding Sites Drawing Criticism
by Spencer S. Hsu and Sylvia MorenoThe Washington Post
February 2nd, 2007
Ringed by barbed wire, a futuristic tent city rises from the Rio Grande Valley in the remote southern tip of Texas, the largest camp in a federal detention system rapidly gearing up to keep pace with Washington's increasing demand for stronger enforcement of immigration laws.

NIGERIA: Corruption and Misuse Robs Nigerians of Rights
Human Rights Watch
January 31st, 2007
Human Rights Watch Report: Rivers State, Nigeria Local Governments Squander Oil Revenues Instead of Funding Health, Education

US: PUC Not Letting Verizon off Hook
by Ann S. KimPortland Press Herald (MAINE)
January 30th, 2007
The Maine Public Utilities Commission decided Monday to begin contempt proceedings against Verizon Communications for failing to affirm the truthfulness of statements the company made about its possible role in the government's warrantless surveillance program.

US: Fidelity's Sudan problem Divestment campaign targets mutual funds, and the nation's largest mutual fund company is the first target, says Fortune's Marc Gunther.
by Marc GuntherCNN Money
January 29th, 2007
As institutional investors learned that Chinese oil companies are helping to finance genocide in Sudan, many took action.

SOUTH AFRICA: Avocados, Diamonds at Core of Anti-Israel Trade Campaign
by Moyiga NduruInter Press Service
January 26th, 2007
A call from a South African trade unionist for national supermarket chains to stop importing avocado from Israel could ultimately lead to the banning of all imports from the Jewish state, if unions and human rights activists have their way.

BRAZIL: Enslaved workers make charcoal used to make basic steel ingredient
by Michael Smith and David VoreacosSeattle Times
January 21st, 2007
Enslaved workers make charcoal used to make basic steel ingredient

Levi’s suspended by ethical group in living wage row
by Sarah ButlerTimes Online
January 20th, 2007
Levi Strauss, the denim company, has been suspended from the Ethical Trading Initiative (ETI) for a year in a row over the concept of a living wage.

US: Money clashes with mission
by Charles PillerLA Times
January 8th, 2007
The Gates Foundation invests heavily in sub-prime lenders and other businesses that undercut its good works.

UK: UK class action starts over toxic waste dumped in Africa
by John VidalGuardian (UK)
January 8th, 2007
Lawyers will today begin preparing the ground for one of the largest class actions heard in the UK over 400 tonnes of allegedly highly toxic waste dumped in the Ivory Coast from a cargo ship chartered by a London-based company.

US: Dark cloud over good works of Gates Foundation
by Charles Piller, Edmund Sanders and Robyn DixonL A Times
January 7th, 2007
An ink spot certified that he had been immunized against polio and measles, thanks to a vaccination drive supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. But polio is not the only threat Justice faces. Almost since birth, he has had respiratory trouble. His neighbors call it "the cough." People blame fumes and soot spewing from flames that tower 300 feet into the air over a nearby oil plant. It is owned by the Italian petroleum giant Eni, whose investors include the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

CHAD: World Bank OK With Blood For Oil
by Daphne WyshamTomPaine
January 5th, 2007

BELIZE: I-A Commission says GOB must protect indigenous people of Toledo
The Reporter (BELIZE)
January 5th, 2007
By permitting oil exploration on indigenous lands in the Toledo District the Government of Belize is violating treaty obligations and also a 2004 ruling by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.

CHINA: Hundreds of workers protest company beatings
Asia News
January 5th, 2007
Hundreds of workers yesterday held a protest in Pingshan (Shenzhen) outside DeCoro, an Italian sofa company, accusing supervisors of severely beating three employees who dared to ask for respect of the minimum wage. In November 2005 disputes had already taken place between the employees and the company with mutual accusations of violence made.

LIBERIA: Firestone's Liberian base called a 'gulag': A group has filed suit contending employees are overworked, underpaid, and exposed to pesticides.
by Shashank BengaliThe Philadelphia Inquirer
December 31st, 2006
In Liberia, a war-ravaged country with 80 percent unemployment, almost any job is a good one. But Firestone is increasingly under fire from human-rights advocates here and in the United States who say conditions on the 80-year-old plantation in Harbel - Firestone's single-biggest source of raw material for its U.S. manufacturing operations - are scandalous.

INDIA: Farmland to factory in industrializing India
by Somini SenguptaInternational Herald Tribune
December 29th, 2006
Just beyond the city limits, a patch of land where an auto factory is planned amid a sprawl of potato fields and rice paddies has become a battleground for the world's longest-running democratically elected Communist government.

US: OSHA Cites Tool Maker
Hartford Courant
December 27th, 2006
A West Hartford tool manufacturing plant has been cited for widespread safety and health hazards for the third time in six years by the Hartford office of the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration, the agency said Tuesday.

CHINA: Group reports harsh working conditions at Bratz factory
Associated Press
December 22nd, 2006
The pouty Bratz dolls so popular as Christmas presents are made at a factory in southern China where workers are obliged to toil up to 94 hours a week, among other violations, a labor rights group said in a report released Friday.

CHINA: Net giants 'still failing China'
by Thembi MutchBBC News
December 18th, 2006
Earlier this year net giants Google and Yahoo came under fire from Human Rights Watch and Reporters Sans Frontieres, for their activities in China. But is the criticism warranted?

CHINA: Net giants 'still failing China'
by Thembi MutchBBC News Online
December 18th, 2006
Earlier this year net giants Google and Yahoo came under fire from Human Rights Watch and Reporters Sans Frontieres, for their activities in China. But is the criticism warranted?

US: Shareholders to Dow: Deal with Mass Poisoning Fallout
by Aaron GlantzOne World US
December 9th, 2006
Owners of more than $278 million in shares of Dow Chemical field a shareholder resolution this week demanding the company address outstanding issues from a 1984 explosion at a pesticide plant in India.

US: Corporation wants to drill on Mt. Taylor
by Zsombor PeterThe Gallup Independent
December 7th, 2006
After drilling six exploratory holes by Mt. Taylor earlier this year in search of uranium, the Western Energy Development Corporation is asking for state and federal permission to drill 47 more.

US: Apple gets low score in Greenpeace e-waste report
by Jim DalrympleMacworld
December 6th, 2006
Environmental group Greenpeace on Wednesday issued the first quarterly update on the technology industry’s performance on environmental issues. While the group recognized many companies are improving Apple does not appear to be among them — Apple remains in last place.

GHANA: Ghana's gold inflicts heavy price
by James HaselipPeople and the Planet
December 6th, 2006
Gold mining is Ghana�s most valuable export industry: in 2005, US$1.4 billion worth of gold was shipped from the country, dwarfing the value of its other major foreign currency earners - timber and cocoa. However, very little of the gold revenues stay in the country while damage to the physical environment by both large and small-scale mining is inflicting an incalculable cost to the economy with vast tracts of farming land permanently ruined, forests destroyed and water resources diverted and polluted.

PERU: Half the Peruvian Amazon Leased for Petroleum Development
Envinroment News Service
December 4th, 2006
Conservation groups based in Washington warned today that the Peruvian government is signing so many contracts with multinational oil companies that half the rainforest of the Peruvian Amazon is now covered with oil leases.

US: BLIGHTED HOMELAND: Mining firms again eyeing Navajo land
by Judy PasternakThe Los Angeles Times
November 22nd, 2006
Decades after the Cold War uranium boom ended, leaving a trail of poisonous waste across the Navajo Nation, the mining industry is back, seeking to tap the region's vast uranium deposits once again.

WORLD: Controlling the Corporate Mercenaries
by Nick Dearden, War on WantZmag
November 7th, 2006
While Iraq represents bloodshed and death on a massive scale to most people, to Private Military and Security Companies (PMSCs) it has brought a boom time, boosting the revenues of British-based PMSCs alone from £320 million in 2003 to more than £1.8 billion in 2004. In the same year income for the industry worldwide reached $100 billion.

NIGERIA: Niger Delta bears brunt after 50 years of oil spills
by Jonathan BrownThe Independent (UK)
October 26th, 2006
Up to 1.5 million tons of oil, 50 times the pollution unleashed in the Exxon Valdez tanker disaster, has been spilt in the ecologically precious Niger Delta over the past 50 years, it was revealed yesterday.

IVORY COAST: Ivorians to sue 'toxic ship' firm
BBC News
October 24th, 2006
A Dutch lawyer representing some 1,000 victims of toxic waste dumped in Ivory Coast says he is suing the company that shipped the waste there.

US: THE C.I.A.’S TRAVEL AGENT
by Jane MayerThe New Yorker
October 23rd, 2006
On the official Web site of Boeing, the world’s largest aerospace company, there is a section devoted to a subsidiary called Jeppesen International Trip Planning, based in San Jose, California. The write-up mentions that the division “offers everything needed for efficient, hassle-free, international flight operations,” spanning the globe “from Aachen to Zhengzhou.” The paragraph concludes, “Jeppesen has done it all.”

US: Critics attack Myanmar’s ‘blood gem’ auctions
by Charlotte McDonald-GibsonAgence France Presse
October 18th, 2006
With up to 90 percent of the world’s rubies and many other precious gems mined in Myanmar, chances are that a vast proportion of the stones glinting in the windows of high-end jewelers worldwide originate in the military-ruled nation.

IRAQ: In Iraq, contractor deaths near 650, legal fog thickens
by Bernd DebusmannReuters
October 10th, 2006
The war in Iraq has killed at least 647 civilian contractors to date, according to official figures that provide a stark reminder of the huge role of civilians in supporting the U.S. military.

INDIA: 80,000 coal belt families face evacuation
Statesman News Service
October 10th, 2006
As many as 80,000 families living near the Jharia mine in Dhanbad coal belt face relocation. Officials say the coalfield area is, in effect, sitting on a “giant fireball deep inside the earth,” after they discovered at least six underground leaks of toxic fumes. Experts fear massive underground explosions followed by subsidence occuring at any moment.

LIBERIA: Mittal accused of creating a state within a state in Liberia
by David PallisterThe Guardian (UK)
October 2nd, 2006
A damning report on Mittal Steel's acquisition of an impoverished African country's iron ore reserves is published today, accusing the world's largest steelmaker of offering an inequitable "raw deal" that has created an unaccountable "state within a state".

CANADA: Mining Rights Trampling Human Rights, activists charge
by Stephen LeahyInter Press News Service (IPS)
September 29th, 2006
Activists want the Canadian government to impose mandatory human rights and environmental standards on Canadian mining and oil companies operating in Latin America and other developing regions.

CANADA: Activists Push for Sustainable Mining
by Stephen LeahyInter Press News Service (IPS)
September 29th, 2006
Civil society activists want the Canadian government to impose mandatory human rights and environmental standards on Canadian mining and oil companies operating in Latin America and other developing regions.

IVORY COAST: Ivory Coast waste 'was not toxic'
by Martin Plaut BBC News
September 26th, 2006
The company that discharged 500 tonnes of waste in Ivory Coast has denied that the product was toxic.

IVORY COAST: Toxic dumpers face jail term
Reuters
September 24th, 2006
SUSPECTS charged in connection with the dumping of toxic waste in Ivory Coast, which killed seven people and made thousands ill, could face up to 20 years in jail if convicted, a Justice Ministry official said.

IVORY COAST: Waste Headed for a Third World Bin
by Julio GodoyInter Press Service
September 21st, 2006
The Panamanian flagged ship Probo Koala unloaded more than 550 tonnes of toxic waste at Abidjan port in C- te d'Ivoire a month back. Emissions from that toxic waste have killed seven people and poisoned thousands.

IVORY COAST: Ivory Coast Nabs 2 Execs in Dump Scandal
Associated Press
September 18th, 2006
Authorities arrested and charged two executives of a Dutch commodities company whose dumped toxic waste has caused seven deaths and widespread sickness in the Ivory Coast's largest city, a government official said Monday.

AFRICA: War, Murder, Rape... All for Your Cell
by Stan CoxAlternet
September 14th, 2006
Cassiterite, or tin oxide, is the most important source of the metallic element tin, and the DRC is home to fully one-third of the world's reserves. Some cassiterite miners work on sites operated directly by the country's military or other armed groups. Working in the same area are "artisanal" miners who are theoretically independent, like prospectors in America's Old West. But the cassiterite they extract is heavily taxed by the soldiers -- when it's not just stolen outright.

US: FBI, congressional panel open their own HP probes
by 
Benjamin Pimentel
San Francisco Chronicle
September 12th, 2006
The scandal surrounding Hewlett-Packard Co. escalated Monday when members of Congress and federal law enforcement officials announced they would launch inquiries into the tech giant's practices during a controversial probe of media leaks that began last year.

Ivory Coast: More die from Ivory Coast waste
BBC News
September 12th, 2006
Six people have now died from the toxic waste dumped in the biggest Ivory Coast city, Abidjan, while 9,000 have sought treatment, the government says.

AFRICA: Toll jumps to 5,000 poisoned in Ivory Coast toxic waste scandal
Agence France Presse
September 10th, 2006
The human toll in Ivory Coast's toxic waste scandal rose sharply from 1,500 to more than 5,000 people contaminated by open-air dumping sites in Abidjan, the health ministry said.

TRINIDAD: Prime Minister sounds Alcoa warning
by Clint Chan TackNewsday (Trinidad and Tobago)
September 6th, 2006
Prime Minister Patrick Manning yesterday said Alcoa would not be allowed to construct its controversial aluminium smelter in Chatham if it does not commit to developing downstream aluminium industries in Trinidad and Tobago.

WORLD: Private Sector 'Not the Answer to Poverty'
by Philip ThorntonIndependent (UK)
September 1st, 2006
Rich countries must deliver more money directly to poor nations to avert a growing health and sanitation crisis spreading across the southern hemisphere, Oxfam will say today.

INDIA: Union Carbide Must Clean Bhopal Mess - Residents
by Nityanand JayaramanInter Press Service (IPS)
September 1st, 2006
After an appellate court in the United States rejected claims by Bhopal city residents, seeking compensation from Union Carbide for environmental contamination around the site of the world's worst industrial disaster, plans are afoot to have the case transferred to India.

TRINIDAD: Residents, police clash in Chatham
by Susan MohammedNewsday (Trinidad and Tobago)
August 30th, 2006
A CONFRONTATION involving Chatham residents protesting the construction of ALCOA’s multi-million dollar smelter plant and Alcoa officials and police threatened to become violent yesterday, when a policeman held one of the protesters at gunpoint.

INDONESIA: Newmont Exec to Defend Himself in Court
by Robin McDowellAssociated Press
August 25th, 2006
An American gold-mining executive was preparing Friday to defend himself in court for the first time against charges his company dumped millions of tons of mercury and arsenic-laced waste into an Indonesian bay, sickening villagers.

PHILIPPINES: Lafayette test run cause of water contamination
by Mark Ivan RoblasThe Manilla Times
August 25th, 2006
GOVERNMENT officials and Greenpeace activists have discovered contamination of the waters on Rapu-Rapu Island as the test run for the resumption of the operations of Lafayette Philippines Inc. continues.

PERU: Beggar on a Throne of Gold
by Milagros SalazarInter Press Service (IPS)
August 23rd, 2006
Mining companies operating in Peru are seeing increasing millions in profits as a result of the surge in international prices for metals, but few are contributing what is needed to alleviate the poverty of the people living in mining areas.

THAILAND: Patent or patient? How Washington uses trade deals to protect drugs
by Alan Beattie, Andrew Jack and Amy KazminThe Financial Times
August 22nd, 2006
As the World Health Organisation's top man in Thailand, William Aldis knew Thai officials were hosting their US counterparts in the northern city of Chiang Mai to negotiate what to many outsiders might seem an entirely worthy objective: a bi­lateral free-trade deal. But he saw dangers - and decided to make his views public.

INDIA: Pesticide Charge in India Hurts Pepsi and Coke
by Amelia GentlemanInternational Herald Tribune
August 22nd, 2006
When claims were first published on the front pages of Indian newspapers this month that Coca-Cola and PepsiCo beverages were contaminated with pesticides, executives at the two companies were breezily confident that they could handle the issue. Three weeks later, though, they are still struggling to win back Indian consumers. One-quarter of India’s component states have imposed partial bans on their products, and a complex legal battle to overturn those bans is only just beginning.

CANADA: Our side of defence
by Jorge BarreraThe Ottawa Times
August 20th, 2006
Ottawa may have the reputation of a government town, but it's also home to Canada's military-industrial complex.

WORLD: Has Coke become the new McDonald's?
by David TeatherThe Guardian (UK)
August 18th, 2006
Welcome to the Coke side of life. Africa's planned legal action is just the latest in a litany of alleged human rights and environmental abuses in developing markets that has made Coca-Cola a cause celebre.

PERU: Indigenous Community to Take Oil Company to Court
by Milagros SalazarInter Press Service
August 17th, 2006
Arankartuktaram! This Achuar cry sums up what indigenous communities in the heart of Peru's Amazon jungle region are demanding from the State and multinational oil companies -- a little respect.

INDONESIA: Java sinks deeper into toxic crisis
by Mark ForbesThe Age (AUS)
August 12th, 2006
TOXIC mud still spurting from a gas drilling well part-owned by Australian mining giant Santos is threatening to mire East Java in a full-scale disaster.

NIGERIA: Shell to Pay Nigeria $1.5bn to the Ijaw people
African Echo
July 20th, 2006
A Nigerian court has ordered oil giant Shell's local operation to pay $1.5bn to the Ijaw people of the Delta region, who have been fighting since 2000 for compensation for environmental degradation in the oilrich region. They took the case to court after Shell refused to make the payment ordered by Nigeria's parliament in 2000.

MOZAMBIQUE: Cement Company Tries to Explain Pollution
Agencia de Informacao de Mocambique (Maputo)
July 17th, 2006
One of the worst polluters in the Maputo region, the Portuguese-owned cement company, Cimentos de Mocambique, has tried to blame the electricity company, EDM, for the clouds of cement dust that frequently belch out of its factory in the southern city of Matola.

INDIA: Petri Dish for Pharmaceutical MNCs
by Ann De RonInter Press News Service
July 10th, 2006
Pharmaceutical multinationals, seeking to ramp up profits through cheap drug trials, are increasingly turning to India with its combination of a vast pool of poor, ignorant patients on the one hand and skilled medical personnel and fine research infrastructure on the other.

INDONESIA: Adidas 'fails to act' over sacked workers
by John AglionbyGuardian Unlimited
July 6th, 2006
Sportswear giant Adidas has reneged on its promise to demand the reinstatement of 33 workers dismissed from a major Indonesian supplier in a way the country's human rights commission has found to be illegal, Oxfam alleged today.

DRC: Minerals Flow Abroad, Misery Remains
by Emad MekayInter Press News Service
July 5th, 2006
International companies and local elites in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) are pocketing revenues from copper and cobalt production instead of sharing it with local communities or spending it to reduce poverty, a watchdog group charged Wednesday.

US: The 100 Worst Corporate Citizens
by Phil MatteraThe Corporate Research Project
July 1st, 2006
For the past 52 years, Fortune magazine has been publishing a list of the largest U.S. corporations, an annual chance for chief executives to brag that "my revenue is bigger than yours." For the past seven years, Business Ethics magazine has issued another kind of ranking -- a list of what it calls the "100 Best Corporate Citizens" -- that promotes virtue over size in the perennial game of corporate comparisons.

BRAZIL: Giant Cracks Appear in New Brazilian Dam
Environment News Service
June 29th, 2006
The recently completed Campos Novos Dam in southern Brazil failed last week to contain the water in its reservoir, releasing all the water impounded behind the 626-foot (202-meter) tall structure.

AUSTRALIA: Toxic cocktail released in fire
by 
Jason Gregory, Michael Corkill and Margaret Slocombe
The Courier Mail
June 29th, 2006
A HIGH-LEVEL government report into toxic hazards at a notorious industrial estate north of Brisbane is expected to find several violations of chemical storage rules by businesses located on the site.

WORLD: Legalizing Human Trafficking
by Basav SenDollars & Sense
June 28th, 2006
The General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS), now being negotiated in the World Trade Organization (WTO), is likely to reduce migrant workers to the status of commodities.

AUSTRALIA: Mt Isa Lead Risk For Children
by Michelle Wiese BockmannThe Australian
June 21st, 2006
Children in the Queensland mining capital of Mount Isa have been put at risk by fallout from the city's copper and lead smelters because the state Government has failed to routinely test for lead poisoning.

INDIA: Private Hydel Project on Naramda River Halted
by Bharat Dogra Inter Press News Service
June 20th, 2006
Once again, the government has been compelled to suspend work on the Maheshwar dam over the Narmada River in central India.

US: Drugs firm blocks cheap blindness cure
by Sarah BoseleyThe Guardian
June 17th, 2006
A major drug company is blocking access to a medicine that is cheaply and effectively saving thousands of people from going blind because it wants to launch a more expensive product on the market.

US: Caterpillar Pressured Over "Weaponised Bulldozers"
by Emad MekayInter Press News Service
June 15th, 2006
The parents of a U.S. peace activist who was crushed to death by an Israeli bulldozer built by the global machinery giant Caterpillar confronted the company Wednesday for the first time and urged shareholders at its annual meeting to end sales of "weaponised bulldozers to Israel".

US: ATT: Wired News is a "Scofflaw"
by Ryan SingellWired News
June 13th, 2006
Wired News is a "scofflaw" full of "hot air" and should not be heard in a class-action lawsuit accusing AT&T of violating customers' privacy by cooperating with the National Security Agency in a warrantless internet wiretap operation, the telecommunications company said in a court filing Monday.

UK: British PLCs risk human rights litigation in US, lawyers warn
by Michael HermanThe Times Online
June 12th, 2006
British companies with global operations face a growing threat of being sued in the US over their dealings with foreign governments accused of human rights violations, a leading lawyer has warned.

CONGO: Congo's Child Miner Shame
by Orla GuerinBBC News
June 12th, 2006
To commemorate World Day Against Child Labour, BBC News has spent a day with child miners in the Democratic Republic of Congo, who work for about one dollar per day. At Ruashi mine, in the Eastern province of Katanga, almost 800 children dig for copper and cobalt.

CHINA: Google must obey China law
by Verne KopytoffSan Francisco Chronicle
June 9th, 2006
China's government reiterated on Thursday that foreign Internet companies such as Google Inc. must abide by its laws, which require censoring online material that is considered to be politically sensitive.

AUSTRALIA: Virgin Blue discrimination case flies again
The Age
June 8th, 2006
Virgin Blue has launched an appeal against a ruling that it discriminated against eight former Ansett flight attendants because they were not young and attractive enough.

KATRINA: Study: Immigrant workers endure hazardous conditions, abuse post-Katrina
by Rukmini CallimachiAssociated Press
June 7th, 2006
Immigrant workers rebuilding New Orleans are especially vulnerable to exploitation, according to a study released Tuesday by professors at Tulane University and the University of California at Berkeley.

US: Biggest pension fund boycotts Wal-Mart
by Terry MacalisterThe Guardian
June 7th, 2006
Wal-Mart, the world's biggest retailer and owner of the Asda supermarket chain, is being boycotted by the world's largest pension fund for alleged "serious and systematic" abuses of human and employment rights.

US: Verizon Bias Suit Deal Sets Record
by Amy JoyceWashington Post
June 6th, 2006
Verizon Communications Inc. will pay almost $49 million to 12,326 current and former female employees as part of a landmark class-action lawsuit alleging pregnancy discrimination.

US: ACLU Raises Surveillance as Issue in Big Phone Merger
by Ken BelsonThe New York Times
June 5th, 2006
The American Civil Liberties Union asked the Federal Communications Commission yesterday to withhold approval of AT&T's acquisition of BellSouth until it reviews allegations that the companies gave customer records to the government without warrants.

AUSTRALIA: Centennial Coal’s community consultation has a price
by Ross Kendall and Michael WalshEthical Investor
June 1st, 2006
Centennial Coal is attempting buy ‘people’s opinions and right to free speech’ with its property purchase contracts for a new mine, according Greenpeace and a local residents group.

US: U.S. Wants Companies to Keep Web Usage Records
by Saul Hansell and Eric LichtblauThe New York Times
June 1st, 2006
The Justice Department is asking Internet companies to keep records on the Web-surfing activities of their customers to aid law enforcement, and may propose legislation to force them to do so.

CANADA: Platinum Mine Sparks Lawsuits
Canadian Press
May 29th, 2006
The development of a potentially rare and lucrative platinum mine near a reserve in Northern Ontario has prompted a First Nation to sue the provincial government while it faces a $10 billion lawsuit from a Canadian exploration company.

WORLD: Drug Companies 'Failing to Meet Health Needs of World's Poorest'
by Jeremy LauranceIndependent (UK)
May 23rd, 2006
The existing system of drug patenting and pricing is fundamentally flawed and does not meet health needs, according to report released to health experts last month.

WORLD: The Scariest Predators in the Corporate Jungle
by Thalif DeenInter-Press Service
May 23rd, 2006
The world's oil, gas and mining industries account for nearly two-thirds of all violations of human rights, environmental laws and international labour standards, according to a soon-to-be-released United Nations study.

NIGERIA: Ijaw Win $1.5 Billion Suit Against Shell
by George OnahVanguard (Lagos)
May 23rd, 2006
The Federal High Court in Port Harcourt, Rivers State, has ordered Shell Petroleum Development Company, SPDC, to pay $1.5 billion about N210 billion into the coffers of Central Bank of Nigeria, in favour of the Ijaw Aborigenes of Bayelsa State, between last Friday and noon tomorrow.

IRAQ: Rights Group Faults U.S. for 'War Outsourcing'
by Alan CowellThe New York Times
May 23rd, 2006
Amnesty International today assailed the United States' use of military contractors in Iraq as "war outsourcing" and said the behavior of some contractors had diminished America's moral standing.

US: Uh-oh, it's the shareholders
by Bruce MeyersonChicago Sun-Times
May 21st, 2006
It happens only once a year, and yet so many headstrong corporate CEO's can't seem to cope with being in a room with shareholders for a few hours at the annual meeting.

US: AT&T Whistle-Blower's Evidence
Wired
May 17th, 2006
Former AT&T technician Mark Klein is the key witness in the Electronic Frontier Foundation's class-action lawsuit against the company, which alleges that AT&T illegally cooperated in an illegal National Security Agency domestic-surveillance program.

US: Indigenous join global protest of Newmont gold mining practices
by Brenda NorrellIndian County Today
May 12th, 2006
Western Shoshone and Colville tribal members protested in early May at Newmont Mining Corp.'s annual shareholders meeting, uniting with indigenous from Peru, Indonesia and Ghana to create a protest over the pollution and scarred land resulting from gold mining.

UK: Roddick Targets Nestlé after Corporate 'Sell-Out'
by Jonathan BrownThe Independent
May 11th, 2006
Dame Anita Roddick has admitted that she harbours concerns over the ethical record of Nestlé, a major shareholder in the French cosmetic giant L'Oréal, which bought the Body Shop for £652m.

JORDAN: An Ugly Side of Free Trade - Sweatshops
by Steven Greenhouse and Michael BarbaroThe New York Times
May 3rd, 2006
Workers from Bangladesh said they paid $1,000 to $3,000 to work in Jordan, but when they arrived, their passports were confiscated, restricting their ability to leave and tying them to jobs that often pay far less than promised and far less than the country's minimum wage.

NETHERLANDS: The Dutch Try One of Their Own Over Links to Liberia
by Marlise SimonsThe New York Times
May 3rd, 2006
Mr. van Kouwenhoven, 63, is also charged with war crimes. He is accused of supplying Mr. Taylor with militia fighters from his lumber companies. He is further charged with violating a United Nations embargo by smuggling weapons into Liberia. His trial, held under a new mix of national and international law, is drawing attention because it is the second time a Dutch court is prosecuting a Dutch businessman for being involved with human rights abuses on another continent.

CHINA: Yahoo China is under fire again
by Ilya GargerMarketWatch
April 28th, 2006
U.S. internet companies like Yahoo and Google may have gone to China hoping to find a gold mine. But it's also turned out to be a mine field of controversy over censorship and political rights.

US: Halliburton' Internment Camps
by Ruth ConniffThe Progressive
April 18th, 2006
KBR, the Halliburton subsidiary recently reprimanded for gross overcharging in its military contracts in Iraq, won a $385 million contract to build large-scale detention centers in case of an "emergency influx" of immigrants.

US: The Case Against Coke
by Michaeil BlandingThe Nation
April 14th, 2006
The Coca-Cola Company will hold its stockholders' meeting, an annual exercise designed to boost the confidence of investors. If the meeting is anything like last year's, however, it may do the opposite.

ARGENTINA: Bolivian Community Divided Over Sweatshops
by Marcela ValenteInter Press News Service
April 6th, 2006
The Buenos Aires city government's new offensive against slave labour has resulted in the closure of 30 clandestine textile sweatshops in the Argentine capital. But it has also caused divisions in the Bolivian immigrant community: some denounce the exploitative labour conditions, while others desperately want to keep their jobs, however precarious.

US: US lawmakers come to Bhopal gas victims help
Rediff.com
April 5th, 2006
Eleven members of US Congress today filed an amicus brief with the country's Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit on behalf of more than 20,000 victims of the 1984 Union Carbide chemical disaster in Bhopal.

NIGERIA: Government Investigation Indicts Shell over Toxic Waste
by Yemie AdeoyeVanguard (Lagos)
April 4th, 2006
THE Ministerial investigation committee into alleged dumping of toxic waste by the Shell Petroleum Development Company (SPDC) at Igbeku and Ejekimoni communities of Sapele local government area of Delta State has come up with recommendations for the company to remove and treat in situ the "alleged buried waste" to acceptable statutory levels.

VIETNAM: Agent Orange Victims Gather to Seek Justice
Reuters
March 28th, 2006
Vietnam War veterans from the United States, South Korea, Australia and Vietnam gathered on Tuesday to call for more help for the victims of the Agent Orange defoliant used by the U.S. military.

BOTSWANA: Bushmen Living: 'I chose to call it stone age' Said Tonge
by Jeff MillerDiamonds.net News Center
March 24th, 2006
Renewed political discord hit the presses this week from London about the San Bushmen of Botswana.

INDONESIA: Stones Kill 4 Indonesian Officials in U.S. Mine Protest
by Jane PerlezThe New York Times
March 16th, 2006
Police and rock throwing demonstrators clashed during a protest against the American mining company, Freeport-McMoRan, today leaving three policemen and one Air Force officer dead in the remote province of Papua, witnesses and officials said.

INDONESIA: U.S. Aid to Corrupt TNI Risks More Rights Abuses
by Lisa MisolThe Jakarta Post
March 14th, 2006
U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice's visit to Jakarta follows the Bush Administration's controversial decision to reestablish full relations with the Indonesian Military (TNI). That move opens the door to renewed U.S. assistance, but pumping aid to an unreformed Indonesian military would serve only to encourage further rights abuses and undermine civilian governance.

PERU: Substandard Peruvian Gas Pipeline Blamed for Spills
Environmental News Service
March 2nd, 2006
A pipeline crossing the Peruvian Amazon has spilled natural gas liquids four times since it opened 15 months ago because it was shoddily built by unqualified welders using corroded pipes left from other jobs, according to a new technical report by the nonprofit environmental consultancy E-Tech International based in San Diego.

PERU: Bank Rejects Rapid Review of Controversial Pipeline
by Emad MekayInter Press Service News Agency
March 1st, 2006
The main public investor in a controversial gas pipeline in Peru's Amazon rainforest that has ruptured four times already appears adamant not to bow to pressure from green groups demanding a full investigation after a study asserted that the pipeline is shoddily built and likely to break again.

UK: UK attacked for Uganda arms deal
by Karen AllenBBC News
March 1st, 2006
The UK has failed to act on promises to plug loopholes that allow the sale of arms to countries with poor human rights records, aid agency Oxfam says. It says that military vehicles were sold to Uganda by a South African subsidiary of the UK firm BAE Systems.

INDONESIA: U.S. mine to pay Jakarta $30 million to settle suit
by Jane PerlezThe New York Times
February 16th, 2006
Newmont Mining agreed Thursday to pay $30 million to Indonesia in a settlement of a civil lawsuit in which the government argued that the company had polluted a bay with arsenic and mercury.

AFRICA: Between a Rock and a Hard Place: 'Conflict Free' Diamonds Emerge -- but Should You Believe It?
by Ron LieberWall Street Journal
February 4th, 2006
The "conflict" or "blood" diamond problem first drew wide notice in the late 1990s, when reports highlighted that rebels in African countries were using diamonds to fund brutal campaigns.

BRAZIL: Indigenous People Fight for Their Rights
by Mario Osava Inter Press Service
February 3rd, 2006
Land conflicts involving indigenous people have multiplied in Brazil over the last few months, generating greater tension and showing once again that the country's roughly 400,000 indigenous people still have a long way to go to win respect for their rights.

INDIA: Police Investigate Death of Coca-Cola Bottling Plant Opponent
Environment News Service
February 2nd, 2006
A Coca-Cola franchise company in India is the subject of a police inquiry into the death of a community leader who had publicly objected to a planned Coca-Cola bottling plant in the village where he chaired the local council.

WORLD: 'Suicide Seeds' Could Spell Death of Peasant Agriculture, UN Meeting Told
by Haider RizviOneWorld.net
January 26th, 2006
Groups fighting for the rights of peasant communities are stepping up pressure on governments to ban the use of genetically modified ''suicide seeds'' at UN-sponsored talks on biodiversity in Spain this week.

SWITZERLAND: "Corporate villains" named and shamed
Swiss Info
January 25th, 2006
The Walt Disney Company, the Chevron Corporation and Citigroup have been awarded booby prizes by Swiss non-governmental organisations (NGOs).

NIGERIA: Shell may pull out of Niger Delta after 17 die in boat raid
by Daniel HowdenThe Independent (UK)
January 17th, 2006
The oil giant Royal Dutch Shell was considering pulling out of the volatile Niger Delta region yesterday after heavily armed militants stormed one of its facilities and killed at least 17 people.

INDONESIA: Recklessness in Indonesia
The New York Times
January 9th, 2006
Freeport-McMoRan, an American company that operates a giant open-pit copper and gold mine in Papua, is a major contributor to Indonesia's economy. The company is also one of Indonesia's most reckless polluters and a source of hard cash -- cash the company concedes is protection money -- for the Indonesian military, which has one of the worst human rights records anywhere.

US: Wal-Mart Web Site Makes Racial Connections
by Ylan Q. MuiWashington Post
January 6th, 2006
Wal-Mart apologized yesterday after its retail Web site directed potential buyers of "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" and "Planet of the Apes" DVDs to also consider purchasing DVDs with African American themes.

CHINA: Microsoft Shuts Down Blog Potentially Offensive to China
by Kathy Chen and Geoffrey FowlerWall Street Journal
January 5th, 2006
Microsoft Corp. has shut down a popular Chinese-language blog that has run edgy content potentially offensive to Chinese authorities, amid China's continuing efforts to control information on the Internet.

US: General Electric workers sue Monsanto over PCBs
by Carey GillamReuters
January 4th, 2006
More than 500 General Electric Co. employees have sued Monsanto Co. along with two related companies, claiming they were exposed to toxic chemicals manufactured for decades by Monsanto, the company said Wednesday.

US: University of Michigan Suspends Coca-Cola Sales
Associated Press
January 2nd, 2006
The University of Michigan suspended sales of Coca-Cola products on its three campuses over allegations that the company permits human-rights and environmental abuses abroad.

NIGERIA: Blood Flows With Oil in Poor Villages
by Lydia PolgreenThe New York Times
January 1st, 2006
For months a pitched battle has been fought between communities that claim authority over this village and the right to control what lies beneath its watery ground: a potentially vast field of crude oil that has caught the attention of a major energy company.

AZERBAIJAN: Azerbaijan oil: a mixed blessing
Christian Science Monitor
December 30th, 2005
The corruption-prone country expects oil revenues to total $160 billion by 2025.

US: Study Tied Pollutant to Cancer; Then Consultants Got Hold of It
by Peter Waldman Wall Street Journal
December 23rd, 2005
Amid contemporary debates about safe levels of chromium-6, a PG & E funded PR scandal involving medical report is remembered.

US: Insurance Redlining Rampant in California
by Brendan CoyneThe New Standard
December 21st, 2005
In many parts of California, moving merely across the street could cause drivers’ car-insurance rates to go up. This is especially the case if the new address is in a zip code with an even slight increase in the percentage of black or Latino residents, a study has found.

US: Seattle jury clears Boeing in racial lawsuit
Reuters
December 21st, 2005
A federal jury in Seattle on Wednesday cleared Boeing Co. in a lawsuit brought by 4,000 black salaried employees, who claimed they were passed over for promotions because of racial discrimination.

AFRICA: Death By Dilution
by Robert CockburnAmerican Prospect
December 20th, 2005
When fakes of a GlaxoSmithKline anti-malarial drug turned up in Africa, authorities assumed the drug giant would want to know. Instead, they learned about a huge, evil trade in fake drugs -- and about an industry that doesn’t want the truth to get out.

INDIA: Testing Drugs on India's Poor
by Scott CarneyWired
December 19th, 2005
Multinational corporations are riding high on the trend toward globalization by taking advantage of India's educated work force and deep poverty to turn South Asia into the world's largest clinical-testing petri dish.

Displaying 1-300 of 560  
Next >> 
Last Page » 
« Show Complete List »