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BURMA: Pressure Mounts on Energy Giant Chevron to Disclose Revenue
by Marwaan Macan-Markar Inter Press Service (IPS)
April 29th, 2010
When shareholders of the multinational company Chevron gather for their annual meeting in the U.S. city of Houston in late May, they will come face to face with Naing Htoo, whose community has suffered due to the exploits of the energy giant in military-ruled Burma.

EUROPE: Europe’s Vast Farm Subsidies Face Challenges
by STEPHEN CASTLE and DOREEN CARVAJALNew York Times
December 29th, 2009
The last time the European Union decided the future of its 50 billion euro agricultural aid program, in 2005, the deal was cut behind closed doors in a luxury suite at the five-star Conrad Brussels hotel. Now, 2013 is closer at hand and a new round of maneuvering has begun to reshape the richest system of agricultural handouts in the world.

FIJI: Fiji Water: Spin the Bottle
by Anna LenzerMother Jones
August 17th, 2009
Obama sips it. Paris Hilton loves it. Mary J. Blige won't sing without it. How did a plastic water bottle, imported from a military dictatorship thousands of miles away, become the epitome of cool?

TANZANIA: Villagers storm Barrick gold mine: Inflict much damage, FFU police deployed to disperse them
This Day (Tanzania)
December 13th, 2008
Thousands of villagers raided the North Mara gold mine owned by Barrick Gold Corp on Thursday night and caused damage to various mining equipments worth more than $16 million (approx. 21bn/-).

GUINEA: One killed in Guinea protest over bauxite trains
Reuters Africa
October 10th, 2008
At least one person was killed when police in Guinea cleared protesters from a railway carrying bauxite for Russian aluminium company RUSAL, police and industry sources said on Friday.

CHILE: Native Community in Desert Oasis Threatened by Mines
by Daniela EstradaInter Press News Service (IPS)
October 9th, 2008
The Diaguita indigenous community in Huasco Alto, surrounded by rich gold, silver and copper deposits in the northern Chilean region of Atacama, are engaged in a struggle to prevent mining projects from infringing on their territory and destroying their way of life and ancestral identity.

IVORY COAST: Pollution trial opens in Ivory Coast
Agence France Press (AFP)
September 29th, 2008
The trial opened in Ivory Coast on Monday of 12 people charged with involvement in a 2006 toxic waste scandal which killed 17 Ivorians and poisoned thousands.

THAILAND: Green Groups Will Take GM Crops Issue To Court
by Marwaan Macan-MarkarIPS News
January 9th, 2008
Thai environmentalists are banking on the country’s courts to overturn a decision by the military-appointed government to allow field trials of genetically modified (GM) crops.

GERMANY: FSC's 'Green' Label for Wood Products Gets Growing Pains
by Tom Wright and Jim CarltonWall Street Journal
October 30th, 2007
The Forest Stewardship Council -- a widely recognized third-party labeling system to identify "green" wood and paper products -- has acknowledged that some companies using its label are destroying pristine forests and says it plans to overhaul its rules.

MEXICO: Thousands of Unpaid Teens Bag Groceries for Wal-Mart
by Joseph ContrerasNewsweek
August 1st, 2007
Wal-Mart prides itself on cutting costs at home and abroad, and its Mexican operations are no exception. Wal-Mart is Mexico's largest private-sector employer in the nation today, with nearly 150,000 local residents on its payroll. An additional 19,000 youngsters between the ages of 14 and 16 work after school in hundreds of Wal-Mart stores, mostly as grocery baggers, throughout Mexico-and none of them receives a red cent in wages or fringe benefits.

BRITAIN: Companies 'looting' a continent
by Fran AbramsBBC News
July 24th, 2007
Gordon Brown has signalled he wants to see poor countries develop through trade rather than aid.

CHILE: Gold rush threatens glacier
by Lucia Newman Al Jazeera
July 8th, 2007
A new gold rush is under way as mining companies seek to supply the ever-increasing demand for the precious metal from emerging economies such as India, and with reserves dwindling all over the world they are going to extraordinary lengths to extract it.

CHINA: The Growing Dangers of China Trade
by Jyoti ThottamTIME Magazine
June 28th, 2007
Growing concerns over the safety of everyday goods manufactured in China and imported to the US have thrown into relief the problematic (and dangerous) differences in safety and regulatory standards between the two countries.

SOUTH AFRICA: Globalization Brings South Africa Gains -- and Pains
by David WesselThe Wall Street Journal
June 21st, 2007
Globalization has been both a boon and a bane for South Africa; it has helped along the country's integration into the global economy and strengthened its regional political position, but it has also contributed to the widening gap between a wealthy minority and the poor majority, something that is creating a whole new generation of disenfranchised citizens.

US: Offshoring and Cheap Imports May Hurt Workers, OECD Says
by Marcus WalkerThe Wall Street Journal
June 19th, 2007
Offshoring and inexpensive imports may be hurting low-skilled workers in the U.S. and Europe to the extent that free trade and open markets could become increasingly difficult for politicians to sell to their constituents, according to one of the world's leading economics institutes.

UK: Starbucks stirred by fair trade film
by Ashley SeagerGuardian Unlimited (UK)
January 29th, 2007
A campaign by Ethiopia to get a fair price for its coffee - some of the world's finest - kicks off in London today as a spokesman for the east African country's impoverished coffee growers meets Tony Blair.

UK: Iraq poised to end drought for thirsting oil giants
by Danny FortsonThe Independent (UK)
January 7th, 2007
For more than three decades, foreign oil companies wanting into Iraq have been like children pressed against the sweet shop window - desperately seeking to feast on the goodies but having no way of getting through the door. That could soon change.

EL SALVADOR: Multinational Capital on the Offensive
by Raúl GutiérrezInter Press Service (IPS)
January 5th, 2007
International financial consortia have already squeezed local shareholders out of banks in El Salvador, and now they are expected to sideline the state, all of which will contribute to widening the gap between rich and poor.

ASIA: Asian Govts Push Generic Drugs
by Marwaan Macan-MarkarInter Press Service
December 18th, 2006
In moves that are winning them praise, two South-east Asian governments -- in Thailand and the Philippines -- appear determined to push ahead with plans to provide cheaper generic drugs even if they incur the wrath of pharmaceutical giants.

CAMEROON: NGOs to the Defence of Local Farmers
by Sylvestre TetchiadaInter Press Service
December 1st, 2006
Cameroonian civil society groups are expressing concern at the effects of trade liberalisation on the Central African country's food security.

COSTA RICA: Companies Eye Pull-Outs if CAFTA Flounders
by Daniel ZuerasInter Press News Service (IPS)
August 29th, 2006
Weary of the snail's pace ratification process of the Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA), which continues to dominate Costa Rica's political and social agenda, some companies are weighing the idea of moving to other Central American countries should Congress reject the treaty.

PERU: ‘Voluntary Payment' Instead of Taxes for Mining Firms
by Milagros SalazarInter Press Service (IPS)
August 25th, 2006
Peruvian Prime Minister Jorge del Castillo told Congress that private mining companies operating in Peru would make a "voluntary payment" of 757.5 million dollars over the next five years, to go towards fighting poverty. However, they will not pay the tax on windfall profits that new President Alan García had promised in his campaign.

THAILAND: Patent or patient? How Washington uses trade deals to protect drugs
by Alan Beattie, Andrew Jack and Amy KazminThe Financial Times
August 22nd, 2006
As the World Health Organisation's top man in Thailand, William Aldis knew Thai officials were hosting their US counterparts in the northern city of Chiang Mai to negotiate what to many outsiders might seem an entirely worthy objective: a bi­lateral free-trade deal. But he saw dangers - and decided to make his views public.

WORLD: Legalizing Human Trafficking
by Basav SenDollars & Sense
June 28th, 2006
The General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS), now being negotiated in the World Trade Organization (WTO), is likely to reduce migrant workers to the status of commodities.

RUSSIA: Russian Download Site Is Popular and Possibly Illegal
by Thomas CramptonInternational Herald Tribune
June 1st, 2006
So great is the official level of concern about AllofMP3 that American trade negotiators darkly warned that the Web site could jeopardize Russia's long-sought entry into the World Trade Organization.

US: Farm Groups Nix US Bid for Deeper WTO Cuts: Sources
REUTERS
May 30th, 2006
The Bush administration sought agreement from U.S. farm groups for a 70 percent cut in their most trade-distorting subsidies as a way to save world trade talks but was rejected, industry sources said on Tuesday.

ECUADOR: Bush administration breaks off free trade talks with Ecuador
by Martin CrutsingerAssociated Press
May 16th, 2006
The Bush administration said Tuesday it had broken off negotiations on a free trade agreement with Ecuador following the South American government's decision to annul an operating contract with Occidental Petroleum Corp.

AFRICA: U.S. Farm Subsidies Hurting Africa's Development
by Joyce MulamaInter Press News Service (IPS)
April 15th, 2006
In a renewed campaign, African trade ministers have urged the United States to remove agricultural subsidies that are hurting African farmers.

EU: Europe Defends Stance on Genetically Altered Foods
by Paul MellerThe New York Times
February 8th, 2006
The European Commission defended its current practices on screening genetically altered foods in the wake of a report from the World Trade Organization that criticized its past action in restricting the entry of modified products into the European Union.

PHILIPPINES: No new mining permits
by Gil C. Cabacungan Jr. , Blanche S. RiveraPhilippine Daily Inquirer
February 4th, 2006
PRESIDENT Macapagal-Arroyo has offered to suspend the issuance of new mining permits to try to appease Roman Catholic bishops strongly opposed to the country's new Mining Act, a top Malacanang official said yesterday.

THAILAND: Thai Farmers Fear Free Trade Deal With US
by Marwaan Macan-MarkarInter Press Service
January 12th, 2006
When United States negotiators fly into Thailand to thrash out a bilateral free trade deal next week, they will be greeted with jeers rather than this country's famed smile of welcome.

GLOBAL: World Bank Gets Cold Feet on Bird Flu Drug Patent
by Marwaan Macan-MarkarInter Press Service
November 4th, 2005
The World Bank has decided that it is not in keeping with its mission to get involved in the emerging global debate on the Tamilfu patent held by the Swiss pharmaceutical giant Roche and that could be broken under the 'compulsory licencing' rules of the World Trade Organisation (WTO).

WORLD: From Bad to Worse: IFC Safeguards
Bretton Woods Project
June 13th, 2005
Devastating impacts of IFC-supported projects on people and the environment, and irresponsible company practises continue to highlight the serious shortcomings of the institution's environmental and social safeguards.

INDIA: Spice Farmers in Misery
by Sunil RamanBBC news
May 13th, 2005
Thousands of spice farmers in India are in the midst of a major crisis, threatening one of the country's best known trades.

EUROPE: Loses Sugar Appeal at W.T.O.
by Tom WrightNew York Times
April 29th, 2005
The World Trade Organization's highest court issued a final ruling Thursday ordering the European Union to stop illegally dumping subsidized sugar on global markets or face punishment.

LATIN AMERICA: AIDS Patients See Life, Death Issues in Trade Pact
by Marla Dickerson and Evelyn IritaniLA Times
April 22nd, 2005
Under CAFTA American pharmaceutical giants would gain a five-year edge on the development of new drugs by low-cost competitors. Generic versions of name-brand drugs are the main weapon for battling the AIDS pandemic in the developing world.

LAOS: Massive Dam Project Could Backfire
by Emad MekayIPS
April 8th, 2005
A new dam funded by the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and hailed as a windfall for Laos may end up doing more harm than good to one of the world's poorest nations and its vulnerable farmers, several independent development groups say.

LATIN AMERICA: Banana Producers Go to WTO
by Raphael Minder and Frances Williams Financial Times
March 30th, 2005
Ecuador and four other Latin American banana producers sought World Trade Organisation arbitration on Wednesday in their dispute with the European Union, raising the prospect of another long trade battle over the EU's banana import regime.

BOLIVIA: Not A Drop To Drink
by  Kelly HearnThe American Prospect
February 25th, 2005
In parched Latin American countries, the battle over water is ready to explode.

EU: WTO gives U.S. the Byrd
by AgenciesTimes Online U.K.
August 31st, 2004
The World Trade Organisation (WTO) backed the EU and seven other WTO members in their demand to punish a US failure to revoke an anti-dumping law -- the so-called Byrd amendment -- declared illegal under international trade rules.

CHINA: China Vows To Protect Markets
by Mure DickieFinancial Times
July 5th, 2004
China wants to make greater use of World Trade Organisation market protection measures, including the use of anti-dumping cases against foreign companies, as its economy and domestic industries adjust to increased competition brought by membership of the WTO.

UK: Oxfam Hopes To Stimulate Taste For Fair Trade
by Simon BowersGuardian
May 14th, 2004
The charity, backed by a loan from Glasgow-based coffee supplier Matthew Algie, yesterday said it hoped consumers' appetite for fair trade-certified coffee will attract new customers and draw others away from the mainstream chains.

Iraq: Amec Deal Saves UK from Embarrassment
by Terry MacalisterGuardian (London)
March 25th, 2004
Amec has won part of a $1bn (550m) contract to rebuild water and sewerage networks in Iraq. The deal is the biggest so far by a UK company for reconstruction work in the war-torn country, but otherwise British firms have lost out.

Chile: Santiago Signs Free Trade Deal with US
by Elliott GotkineBBC
September 17th, 2003

On 3 September, eight days before the country was due to mark 30 years since the military coup that ushered in 17 years of rule by General Augusto Pinochet, the United States approved a long-awaited free trade agreement with its South American neighbour.


World: Rich and Poor Clash Over Farm Aid
BBC
September 12th, 2003
The Group of 21 (G21), which includes China, India and Brazil, has threatened the traditional dominance of rich countries during world trade talks in Cancun, Mexico. The G21 is demanding the complete abolition of subsidies paid by rich countries to their farmers which, they say, locks the developing world out of international markets.

SWITZERLAND: Transnationals Urge Flexibility from Rich Nations
by Gustavo CapdevilaInter Press Service
August 22nd, 2003
An organisation of transnational corporate executives urged the United States, European Union and Japan to cede to some of the demands of developing countries -- particularly in regards to agriculture and drugs patents -- in order to jump-start the WTO trade liberalisation talks

WORLD: A Month from Cancun, WTO and Critics Rev Their Engines
by Gustavo Capdevilalnter Press Service
August 12th, 2003
International trade negotiations this week enter the final stretch before the Fifth WTO Ministerial Conference in Cancun, Mexico, with the first signs of progress in the otherwise troubled agricultural talks and announcements of new mobilizations by groups opposed to the multilateral trade system.

PHILIPPINES: VP Advises Protecting Farmers from Excesses of Trade Liberalization
ABS-CBN.com
July 10th, 2003
Vice President Teofisto Guingona Jr. said the Philippines must adopt a firm policy to protect its agricultural and service sectors from the negative impact of excessive liberalization of tariffs and related policies mandated by its obligations to the World Trade Organization (WTO).

China: US Bosses Step Up Yuan Row
BBC
June 18th, 2003

A powerful industrial lobbying group is calling on the US government to take China to the World Trade Organisation (WTO) over its fixed exchange rate policy. The National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) has said it plans to file a trade complaint with the US Trade Representative, which would force trade officials to consider an official response.


Brazil, India and South Africa: Form G3 to counter G8
by ReutersThe Hindu
June 7th, 2003
Brazil, India and South Africa have formed a trilateral bloc to boost trade and pool their political muscle in talks with rich nations. The new grouping follows soon after the G8 meeting of major industrial nations failed to act on a proposal for subsidy cuts to help Africa and a Brazilian plan to create a global fund to fight hunger.

FRANCE: The G8 Summit: Leaders Paper Over Cracks on WTO Talks
by Robert Graham, James Blitz and Guy de JonquiresFinancial Times
June 3rd, 2003
The Group of Eightmembers yesterday committed themselves to concluding the stalled Doha world trade round on schedule by the end of next year, but hinted at no shifts in negotiating positions that could lead to progress in the talks.

Latin America: Churches Call for Alternative to Free Market
by Marcela ValenteInter Press Service
May 2nd, 2003
BUENOS AIRES-- Leaders of Protestant churches of Latin America, tired of alleviating social problems that they blame on neo-liberal free market policies, have decided to advance their own alternative proposals to governments and the multilateral lending institutions.

Middle East: U.S. Hopes to Pry Open Region's Economies
by James SterngoldSan Francisco Chronicle
April 16th, 2003
Bush administration officials have been clear in saying that as the war winds down and they begin their campaign to bring political reform to Iraq and the Middle East, a critical step will be opening the region's markets to trade and investment.

Central America: Free Trade Deal a Dud, Activists Say
by Emad MekayInter Press Service
April 10th, 2003
WASHINGTON, Apr. 10 (IPS) -- Activists from labor, development, human rights and farm groups are calling on the United States and five Central American countries not to rush a trade agreement that they say is undemocratic and would drive farmers and other vulnerable groups deeper into poverty.

VIETNAM: Country Jolted Over Trademark Debacle
by Tran Dinh Thanh LamInter Press Service
April 8th, 2003
Socialist Vietnam is starting to learn the ways of capitalism as its products enter the global market.

PHILIPPINES: People's Congress Urges Land, Food Without Poisons
Envinroment News Service
April 7th, 2003
Agricultural workers and their families are being poisoned, rural lands, forests, oceans and waters are devastated, biodiversity is being destroyed, and food is unfit for human consumption. With these words, 140 participants from 17 countries at the First Pesticide Action Network Asia and the Pacific Congress in Manila last week warned the world that industrial agriculture as conducted by transnational corporations is undermining the resources needed to sustain food production.

CENTRAL AMERICA: Experts, Citizens Fear Economic Fallout of Iraq War
by Nfer MuozInter Press Service
March 21st, 2003
Ral Carballo, a nearly-blind street vendor in the capital of Costa Rica, is just one of the 4.3 million Central Americans working in the informal economy who have already begun to feel the indirect effects of the war on Iraq.

US: Bush May Use Trade Pacts for Iraq Leverage
by Paul BlusteinWashington Post
March 18th, 2003
Maybe it's just a coincidence that the Commerce Department announced decisions in recent days to confer "market-based-economy" status on Bulgaria and Romania, two Eastern European countries that support President Bush's tough stance on Iraq.

BRAZIL: Weakened Trade Unions Look to Lula for Help
by Mario OsavaInter Press Service
March 12th, 2003
Trade unions proliferated in Brazil from 1991 to 2001, but their power did not keep in step, says a report that is fuelling debate now that the nation's president is a man was a unionist himself, former metalworker Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva.

World: Prior Informed Consent: Asbestos, Pesticides, Lead
Environmental News Service
March 11th, 2003
An international list of chemicals subject to trade controls will expand to include all forms of asbestos, three pesticides, and two forms of lead if recommendations made by a committee of government appointed experts is approved under the Rotterdam Convention. The international treaty requires exporting countries trading in a list of hazardous substances to obtain the prior informed consent of importing countries before proceeding with the trade.

Mali: Doubts Grow About Debt Relief
by Emad MekayInterPress News Service
March 10th, 2003
International creditors of Mali have agreed to cancel $675 million of its debt over time under a controversial debt relief scheme, rewarding the West African nation for its pro-free market economic restructuring plan, they say.

EGYPT: Cairo Offers to Host WTO Mini-Ministerial Meeting in June
by Daniel PruzinWTO Reporter
March 4th, 2003
Egypt is eyeing a late June date to host the next World Trade Organization "mini-ministerial" meeting, Egyptian officials told BNA February 28.

JAPAN: Tokyo Meeting Aims To Boost Flagging WTO
by Katharine MillarAgence France Presse
February 12th, 2003
Trade ministers gather in Tokyo on Friday for a three-day meeting to try to step up the pace of flagging global trade talks, beset by failed deadlines and a lack of progress. Only 25 of the 145 members of the World Trade Organisation (WTO) have been invited to send ministers to the February 14-16 "mini-ministerial". Their task: to thrash out ideas for giving a boost to negotiations, mainly on greater market access in services, industrial goods and the traditionally-thorniest subject of agriculture.

EL SALVADOR: World Trade Body Ignores Union Appeals Over Treatment of Workers
by Marty LoganOneWorld US
February 6th, 2003
The World Trade Organization praised El Salvador Wednesday for taking steps to open up its economy, but ignored a damning report from a global grouping of trade unions that accuses the country of dismissing workers' rights, particularly in export processing zones (EPZs), known locally as 'maquilas.'

EU: Trade Commission to Block Talks on Public Services Liberalization
by By Tobias Buck in Brussels and Guy de Jonquieres in LondonFinancial Times
February 5th, 2003
The European Union is expected to bow today to political and popular concern about public services, by ruling out talks in the Doha world trade round on further liberalization of its health, education, energy and water markets.

SWITZERLAND: Police Ward Off Protesters at World Economic Forum
by Alan CowellNew York Times
January 26th, 2003
DAVOS, Switzerland -- While participants in the World Economic Forum here debated the consequences of a possible war in Iraq, police officers with tear-gas grenades and water cannons mounted a huge security operation to keep protesters away from the delegates, who included Secretary of State Colin Powell.

INDIA: Government Seeks Accountability From Foreign Corporations
by Mamata SinghBusiness Standard
December 12th, 2002
In a significant development, India and China have joined hands to demand a legally enforceable code of conduct for foreign investors to check their abuse of economic power in host countries.

LATIN AMERICA: Is FTAA Integration or Annexation?
by Cecilia RemnLatin America Press
December 9th, 2002
"We don't want to be an American colony!" shouted demonstrators who staged massive protests in Quito, Ecuador, on Oct. 31, as the region's trade ministers held their seventh meeting on the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA). Meanwhile, thousands of Brazilians took to the streets of So Paulo to protest the deal, set to take effect in 2005, which would create the world's largest free-trade zone, with a market of 800 million people.

Mexico: NAFTA Equals Death, Say Peasant Farmers
by Diego CevallosInterPress Service
December 3rd, 2002
MEXICO CITY, Dec 3 (IPS) -- More than 2,000 peasant farmers from throughout Mexico staged a protest Tuesday in the capital to demand a freeze on the agricultural provisions of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which they blame for most of their economic and social woes.

USA: Tariffs on Manufactured Goods Proposed to be Dropped
by Emad MekayInterPress Service
November 26th, 2002
The United States, recently criticised for its protectionist trade policies, on Tuesday proposed removing world tariffs on manufactured goods no later than 2015.

BOLIVIA: Time to Open Up Secret Trade Courts
by Jim ShultzPacific News Service
November 8th, 2002
Two years ago, rioters protesting increased water rates forced a Bechtel, U.S. company, in Bolivia to pack its bags and leave. Now, in a harbinger of the loss of local control through globalization, the corporation is striking back in secret proceedings.

ECUADOR: Anti-Free Trade Protests in Quito End on Positive Note
Food First
November 1st, 2002
The protests against the proposed Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) --and the police violence that rocked Quito during the day yesterday--ended on a positive note for protesters in the evening, putting the Bush Administration's negotiator, Robert Zoellick, in an embarrassing and awkward position.

BRAZIL: Lula Wins Landslide Elections
by Scott WilsonWashington Post
October 28th, 2002
Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, a former union leader who never attended college, won a landslide victory today in a Brazilian presidential election that reflected the disenchantment sweeping much of Latin America after a decade of free-market reforms that have failed to deliver promised prosperity.

US: Sweatshop Case Settles for $20M
by Alexei OreskovicThe Recorder
September 27th, 2002
Three overseas sweatshop lawsuits involving dozens of the United States' largest retailers and a 30,000-member class of garment workers have settled for $20 million.

AUSTRALIA: Police Seek to Shut Down WTO Protest Sites
Sydney Morning Herald
September 25th, 2002
New South Wales (NSW) Police Minister Michael Costa has asked the Federal Government to shut down websites with instructions to disrupt a World Trade Organisation (WTO) meeting in Sydney.

WORLD: New WTO Director Submits Plans for South
by Gustavo CapdevilaInter Press Service
September 2nd, 2002
The new director-general of the World Trade Organisation (WTO), economist Supachai Panitchpakdi, outlined a long-term assistance plan for developing countries and a project for opening of a branch office in Africa on his first day on the job Monday.

USA: Bush on Verge of Fast-Track Trade Victory
by Jim LobeInter Press Service
July 30th, 2002
WASHINGTON -- U.S. President George W. Bush is on the verge of winning ''fast-track'' authority to negotiate new trade agreements, but at the expense of human rights and environmental protections, say die-hard critics.

Canada: Country Poised to Receive G-8 Leaders and the Alternative People's Summit
Environment News Service
June 24th, 2002
CALGARY -- Canada is committed to preserving and protecting the environment during all phases of the G-8 Summit which is set to open in Kananaskis, Alberta on Thursday and Friday, government environmental officials have pledged. A parallel peoples' forum, the Group of Six Billion, says theirs is the gathering that reflects full respect for the environment and human rights.

WORLD: New Survey Shows 2001 Grim for Trade Unions
by Jim LobeOneWorld US
June 18th, 2002
Labor unions around the world faced a difficult year in 2001 due both to direct and sometimes violent repression, as well as the continuing pursuit by major multinational corporations of cheap labor in poor countries, according to the latest in a series of annual reports by the Brussels-based International Confederation of Free Trade Unions (ICFTU).

US: IMF and World Bank Meetings Open as Protestors Gather
Reuters
April 20th, 2002
Chanting, singing and beating drums, tens of thousands of protesters converged on the U.S. capital on Saturday to demonstrate against the U.S.-led war on terror, Israeli military actions in the West Bank and globalization

Central America: Price of Free Trade is Famine
by Marc EdelmanLos Angeles Times
March 22nd, 2002
Central America is in the grip of famine, and if President Bush mentions it when he visits El Salvador on Sunday, he will likely suggest that free trade is the solution. Yet Bush's proposed Central American Free Trade Agreement is hardly going to remedy the worsening disaster in rural Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras and Nicaragua.Unregulated markets are a large part of the reason why 700,000 Central Americans face starvation and nearly 1million more suffer serious food shortages.

MEXICO: Skepticism as UN Summit Opens
by Alejandro RuizWashington Post
March 19th, 2002
One of the poorest towns in Mexico, El Porvenir last year signed a sister-city agreement with one of the richest, San Pedro Garza Garcia, on the outskirts of Monterrey in Nuevo Leon state. The pact signed last August with President Vicente Fox on hand was meant to be a model for a new vision of fighting poverty: an exchange of products, help with schooling and technical training, new investment for a town where fewer than one in five homes has electricity.

USA: Tomato Tariff Wars
by Laura DurnfordRadio Netherlands
March 11th, 2002
Americans consume almost 17 pounds of fresh tomatoes per person every year. It's a $1.4 billion industry. Most are grown in Florida and California but, thanks to a bilateral free trade agreement of 1988 and the 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement, Canadian tomatoes now command more han 43% of the market, beating imports from Belgium and The Netherlands. But far from nourishing economic health and pleasing the business-oriented palate, this particular globalisation recipe is making a mess of the whole kitchen.

SOUTH KOREA: Government Considers Challenging U.S. Over Steel Tariffs at the WTO
by Kim Mi-huiThe Korea Herald
March 6th, 2002
Expressing great discontent over U.S. President George Bush's decision to impose 8-30 percent safeguards on Korean steel imports, the Korean government said that it will consider taking the United States to the World Trade Organization (WTO) to battle the ''unfair'' safeguard measure.

Germany: Ecotax Exemptions Approved
Environment News Service
February 13th, 2002
The European Commission today approved a German request for several sectors to be exempted from its national energy tax program, ending long running negotiations between EU Competition Commissioner Mario Monti and Germany's Finance Minister Hans Eichel.

US: NY Cops Pushed Legal Limits in WEF Protests
by Esther KaplanThe Village Voice
February 13th, 2002
New York City police commish Ray Kelly may be congratulating his Shea-honed troops on ''a tough job well done,'' but several activists and attorneys say policing of the World Economic Forum protests last week was a civil rights disaster. They cite baseless arrests, punitive detentions, and surveillance so aggressive it may have crossed the line even in this Ashcroft era.

FRANCE: Activist Gets Jail for Ransacking McDonald's
Reuters
February 6th, 2002
France's highest court upheld on Wednesday a three-month jail sentence for anti-globalization activist Jose Bove over his ransacking of a McDonald's restaurant to protest U.S. trade barriers.

BRAZIL: World Social Forum for Global Equity, Say Activists
Agence France Presse
February 2nd, 2002
Activists at the second annual World Social Forum rejected the label ''anti,'' saying they were working for democracy and equitable distribution of wealth.

BRAZIL: Porto Alegre Day One
by Martha HoneyForeign Policy in Focus
January 31st, 2002
Under a strong summer sun and a broad political proclamation that "Another world is possible," tens of thousands of activists from around the world are arriving here for the second annual World Social Forum. The host, like last year, is Brazil's southernmost major city, capital of the state of Rio Grande de Sul.

WTO Urged to Hold Guatemalan Government Accountable for Maquila Abuses
International Textile, Garment and Leather Workers' Federation
January 18th, 2002
A WTO review of Guatemala's trade policies has prompted international labor to spotlight that government's total failure to uphold freedom of association and the right to bargain collectively.


USA: Washington Pressures EU to Drop GMO Labeling
Environment News Service
January 16th, 2002
Confidential documents obtained by Friends of the Earth Europe underline American opposition to European Union plans for compulsory tracing and labeling rules for all food and animal feed containing genetically modified organisms (GMOs) above a certain threshold.

USA: Bush Administration Changes Meaning of Dolphin Safe Tuna Label
by Cat LazaroffEnvironment News Service
January 6th, 2002
The Bush administration has decided that a controversial fishing method involving encircling pods of dolphins with mile long nets to catch tuna has "no significant adverse impact" on the dolphins. Conservation groups say the determination, which will allow tuna from Mexico to be sold in the U.S. under a "dolphin safe" label, could spell disaster for imperiled dolphin populations.

QATAR: WTO Still Harmful to Developing Countries
by Walden Bello and Aileen KwaFocus on the Global South (Bangkok, Thailand)
November 14th, 2001
The revised draft ministerial declaration issued in the afternoon of November 13 continues to highly detrimental to the interests of developing countries.

QATAR: WTO to Launch New Trade Talks
Associated Press
November 14th, 2001
DOHA, Qatar -- They went down to the wire and then some, but delegates at the World Trade Organization conference formally agreed Wednesday on starting a new round of negotiations to further lower barriers to trade.

WORLD: Doha's Kamikaze Capitalists
by Naomi KleinToronto Globe & Mail
November 7th, 2001
On Friday, the World Trade Organization begins its meeting in Doha, Qatar. According to U.S. security briefings, there is reason to believe that al-Qaeda, which has plenty of fans in the Persian Gulf state, has managed to get some of its operatives into the country, including an explosives specialist. Some terrorists may even have infiltrated the Qatari military.

USA: Bayer, Anthrax and the WTO
by Sarah BoseleyThe Guardian (UK)
October 24th, 2001
Three people have died of anthrax in the US. Two million die every year of AIDS in Africa. The difference in numbers in huge, but the issue is the same -- patents. Is it right to ban cheaper copies of drugs when public health is at risk? And will the world wake up to the problem now the west has been hit?

US: Nobel Laureate Encourages Global Justice Movement
by Tim ShorrockInter Press Service
October 16th, 2001
Joseph Stiglitz, whose critiques of free market fundamentalism cost him a senior job at the World Bank in 1999 but won him the Nobel Prize for economics last week, has succinct advice for the global justice movement: Keep it up.

WORLD: WTO May Move Meeting Out of Qatar
Associated Press
October 15th, 2001
The World Trade Organization may move a November meeting out of the Persian Gulf country of Qatar because of security worries following the U.S. strikes on Afghanistan, trade envoys said Monday.

WORLD: No Action Yet on WTO
by Robert EvansReuters
September 12th, 2001
Trade officials said on Wednesday work was continuing to prepare the World Trade organisation's ministerial meeting in Qatar in November despite the terror attacks in the United States.

USA: Wartime Opportunists
by Russell Mokhiber and Robert WeissmanFocus on the Corporation
September 6th, 2001
Corporate interests and their proxies are looking to exploit the September 11 tragedy to advance a self-serving agenda that has nothing to do with national security and everything to do with corporate profits and dangerous ideologies.

FRANCE: Farmer Jose Bove Leads New McDonalds Protest
by Jamey KeatenAssociated Press
August 13th, 2001
Militant farmer Jose Bove and two thousand supporters returned Sunday to the same McDonald's restaurant he helped dismantle two years ago, this time holding a more restrained rally to protest unchecked globalization and demand support for farmers.

MEXICO: Farmers March Against Free Trade
Associated Press
August 8th, 2001
Thousands of farmers marched through the Mexican capital Wednesday demanding subsidies and a halt to free trade -- posing the most direct challenge yet to President Vicente Fox's 8-month-old administration.

US: Letter from Inside the Black Bloc
by Mary BlackAlterNet
July 25th, 2001
The following story was sent to us anonymously (Mary Black is a psuedonym) two days after a violent protester was killed in Genoa, Italy. While we may not share the author's opinion about Black Bloc tactics, it is a perspective that hasn't been fully covered, even in the progressive media, and as such deserves publication.

ITALY: Genoa Awaits Protestors
by Alessandra StanleyNew York Times
July 19th, 2001
British by birth, Ms. Brown is married to an Italian and works at a hair salon that will not open for business on Friday when President Bush and seven other government leaders arrive. Neither will almost all of the other shops and restaurants inside the so-called red zone, a secure six- square-mile area where leaders will meet from Friday though Sunday. Some anti-globalization groups have pledged to penetrate the zone.

EU: Anti-Globalization Movement Prepares for Genoa Summit
Agence France Presse
July 11th, 2001
Nine days ahead of this month's G8 summit in the Italian city of Genoa, an ever-developing anti-globalization movement prepares to make its presence felt.

Americas: Free-Trade Draft Exposes Rifts, Opportunities for Critics
by Tim ShorrockInter Press Service
July 6th, 2001
The public release of the draft negotiating text for the Free Trade Agreement of the Americas (FTAA)underscores the wide gulf between the 34 countries involved in the talks while giving impetus to the citizens' movement to stop it.

MEXICO: Economic Downturn Deepens
by Chris KraulLos Angeles Times
July 1st, 2001
From farms and automotive plants on the outskirts of Mexico City to the industrial heartland of Monterrey and the wineries and electronics firms in Tijuana and Guadalajara, signs are that this nation's recession is becoming more entrenched.

New Study: Mexicans Unable to Live on Sweatshop Wages
Coalition for Justice in the Maquiladoras, Interfaith Center on Corporate Responsibility, et al.
June 28th, 2001
Workers in foreign-owned export assembly plants in Mexico are not able to meet a family's basic needs on sweatshop wages, according to a comprehensive study conducted in fifteen Mexican cities.

ITALY: Prime Minister Expects 100,000 Protestors at G-8 Summit
by Alessandra StanleyNew York Times
June 19th, 2001
Worried about a repetition in Italy of the violent protests that occurred at a European Union meeting in Sweden last weekend, Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi said today that he wanted to open a dialogue with demonstrators who are planning to march at the Group of 8 summit meeting in Genoa next month.

SWEDEN: Bush and EU Fail on Global Warming
by Paul TaylorReuters
June 14th, 2001
President Bush and European Union leaders failed to resolve deep differences over global warming Thursday, but agreed to stay together in the Balkans and made some progress on world trade.

SWEDEN: Thousands of Protestors Converge on EU Summit
by Kim GamelAssociated Press
June 14th, 2001
Thousands of anti-globalization and environmental activists converged Thursday on this port city as President Bush joined 15 European Union leaders for a summit expected to focus on the widening gap between Washington and its European allies.

EL SALVADOR: Government Report Details Labor Abuses
by Steven GreenhouseThe New York Times
May 10th, 2001
A long-suppressed report by the Salvadoran government, made public yesterday by an American labor rights group, spelled out serious problems in the country's apparel factories, including unhealthy air and water, large amounts of forced overtime and the frequent dismissal of workers who supported labor unions.

US: Making World Trade Fair
by Doreen HemlockSouth Florida Sun-Sentinel
May 6th, 2001
They're often portrayed as obstructionists to trade and the global economy. But the social movement that mobilized thousands in Quebec last month -- and earlier in Seattle and Prague -- is maturing beyond street protests.

Canada: Summit Called 'Sham,' 'Wishy Washy'
by Melanie SealGlobe and Mail
April 23rd, 2001
Reaction to the summit's final declaration ranged from a ''deplorable sham'' to ''a good start, but there's still a lot more work to be done.''

USA: Bush Says Will Push for Fast Track After Summit
by Steve HollandReuters
April 17th, 2001
President Bush pledged to Latin America on Tuesday that after he returns from a hemispheric summit he will intensify his effort to get key trade negotiating authority from Congress.

Canada: Activists Turned Back at Border
by Basem Boshra and Kevin DoughertyThe National Post (Canada)
April 17th, 2001
Two of three foreign spokesmen for the alternative People's Summit, which opened in Quebec City yesterday, were detained for questioning by Canadian immigration officials and granted limited visas to enter Canada.

US: My Nike Media Adventure
by Jonah PerettiThe Nation
April 9th, 2001
Nike's website allows visitors to create custom shoes bearing a word or slogan -- a service Nike trumpets as being about freedom to choose and freedom to express who you are. Confronted with Nike's celebration of freedom and their statement that if you want it done right, build it yourself, I could not help but think of the people in crowded factories in Asia and South America who actually build Nike shoes.

Argentina: Governments Advance on FTAA - Without Citizen Input
by Marcela ValenteInter Press Service
April 7th, 2001
The meeting of Western Hemisphere trade officials to make progress towards the creation of the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) took place in the Argentine capital, which was practically under siege by heavily armed police backed by armoured cars and police dogs on blockaded streets.

Canada: Prosecutors Pull out of Anti-Activist Conspiracy
Montreal Gazette
April 6th, 2001
Prosecutors say provincial Justice Minister Paul Begin has directed them to delay all bail hearings of arrested protesters for the maximum three full days allowed by law, as a way of keeping them off the street for the duration of the summit, April 20-22.

Canada: Police Arrest Trade Summit Protestors
Canadian Press
April 2nd, 2001
Still, about 70 of the 500 protesters outside the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade were arrested during a ''search and rescue mission'' to retrieve a working draft of the proposed Free Trade Area of the Americas.

Canada: Silencing Quebec
by Naomi KleinGlobe and Mail
March 20th, 2001
It turns out that the most effective form of crowd control isn't pepper spray, water cannons, tear gas, or any of the other weapons being readied by Quebec police in anticipation of the arrival of 34 heads of state. The most cutting-edge form of crowd control is controlling the crowds before they converge: this is state-of-the-art protest deterrence -- the silencing you do yourself.

CHINA: Government Puts Brakes on WTO
by Robert MarquandChristian Science Monitor
March 16th, 2001
After a strong '90s-era push by China's top echelon of reformers to insert this huge but developing country into the fast lane of the world's economy, including World Trade Organization membership this year, a quiet but significant shift toward caution is under way, with a wing of Communist Party brass reportedly worried about the potential social pressures that wrenching and wholesale structural changes to China's economy may bring.

SOUTH AFRICA: Financial Institutions Eye Public Services
by Gumisai MutumeInter Press Service
March 6th, 2001
Anti-privatisation protestors are expected to descend on the streets of Johannesburg this month as they demand a reversal of the sale of their municipal water supply to French multinational Suez Lyonnaise des Eaux.

SRI Lanka: Overtime Law Hurts Sweatshop Workers
by Renuka SenanayakeInter Press Service
March 2nd, 2001
Rights activists are unhappy with the Labour Ministry's plan to amend labour laws to introduce 80 hours of overtime every month for factory workers, including those in export processing zones (EPZ).

MEXICO: Rocks, Tear Gas at Cancun Protest
by Traci CarlAssociated Press
February 28th, 2001
Injured protesters were loaded into ambulances and tourists strolled past bloodstained streets in this beach resort after police charged a group of anti-globalization demonstrators,kicking and beating those they could catch.

MEXICO: World Economic Forum, Anti-Globalization Protestors Gather in Cancun
Agence France Presse
February 26th, 2001
Anti-globalization activists were set Monday to stage a series of protests against the World Economic Forum gathered here for a two-day meeting, but also said they hoped to meet their opponents in debate.

Canada: Government Fights NAFTA Ruling in Court
Environment News Service
February 23rd, 2001
Canada is asking its own federal court to overturn a North American free trade tribunal ruling that Canada breached trade rules when it banned exports of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste in the 1990s.

Canada: Quebec Set to Crackdown on FTAA Protests
by Darryl LerouxAlterNet
February 20th, 2001
From April 20-22, Quebec City has the dubious honour of hosting the 3rd Summit of the Americas. The Summit will bring together 34 heads of state -- every head of state in the Americas except Fidel Castro. And despite stringent security measures, including the largest police deployment in Canadian history, a tremendous contingency of anti-globalization protesters will be there to shake up the process.

FRANCE: McDonald's Foe Jose Bové Back in Court
Agence France Presse
February 15th, 2001
Jose Bové, French peasants' champion and hero of the international anti-globalism movement, was due back in court Thursday on trial for his part in the dismantling of a McDonald's restaurant.

Grave Danger Posed Under NAFTA by Unsafe Mexican Trucks
Public Citizen
February 6th, 2001
Although a trade panel is expected this week to order the United States to permit access to all U.S. roads by Mexican trucks, the U.S. should continue to limit access because of the grave dangers many Mexican trucks pose to motorists on U.S. highways, Public Citizen has concluded in a report released today.

USA: Going Bananas
by Michael JessenAlterNet
February 6th, 2001
With a history tied to colonial exploitation, union busting, presidential influence peddling, and environmental degradation, it's obvious the banana is much more than a topping for breakfast cereal or a nutritious snack food. The banana has been at the center of a controversial World Trade Organization ruling and just last month the world's top banana producer (Chiquita Brands International) appeared to teeter on the brink of bankruptcy even as it filed a half-billion dollar lawsuit against the European Union.

AMERICAN SAMOA: Abuses Cited at Apparel Plant That Supplied U.S. Retailers
by Steven GreenhouseThe New York Times
February 6th, 2001
Workers at a factory in American Samoa that made apparel for the J. C. Penney Company and other retailers were often beaten and were provided food so inadequate that some were ''walking skeletons,'' a Labor Department investigation has found.

SWITZERLAND: Police Barricade Davos to Prevent Protests
by John A. Dillon and Malini GoelForum News Daily
January 28th, 2001
The police used water cannons and steel fences to stop protesters on Saturday from getting within a mile of the World Economic Forum's Annual Meeting in Davos.

US: Shoe Manufacturer Latest Casualty to Free Trade
by Justin PopeThe Associated Press
January 22nd, 2001
Sneaker maker Converse Inc., best known for its basketball and ''Chuck Taylor'' brand shoes, is closing three North American production plants and shifting production to Asia as part of a Chapter 11 bankruptcy reorganization.

BRAZIL: World Social Forum Seeks a 'Possible World'
by Mario OsavaInter Press Service
January 22nd, 2001
The World Social Forum, meanwhile, involves leaders and groups with links to the political left and centre-left, who are attempting to build a broad, worldwide organization to take on what they consider the ''exclusive globalisation'' process imposed by the big capitalists who meet in Davos and to prove that ''another world is possible,'' the theory adopted as a the meeting's slogan.

CHINA: Government Refusal to Cut Aid to Farmers Blocks Bid to Join WTO
Bloomberg News
January 16th, 2001
China won't sacrifice income support for farmers in talks this week to join the World Trade Organization, officials and analysts said yesterday.

SWITZERLAND: WTO Still Not Ready for New Round
by Gustavo CapdevilaInter Press Service
December 21st, 2000
One year after the failed World Trade Organisation (WTO) ministerial conference, the hostile climate established in the US city of Seattle with respect to new negotiations to broaden global economic liberalisation persists.

USA: Latin America Is Priority on Bush Trade Agenda
by Anthony DePalmaNew York Times
December 18th, 2000
He may not be comfortable discussing unrest in East Timor, or pronouncing the name of the leaders of Turkmenistan, but President-elect George W. Bush considers the rest of the Western Hemisphere "our backyard" and will have several opportunities in his first year in office to make Latin America a trade and foreign policy priority.

Brazil: Unions Want FTAA Put to Popular Vote
by Mario OsavaInter Press Service
December 15th, 2000
Some 700 representatives of the central trade unions of the members of South America's leading trade bloc, the Southern Common Market (Mercosur) - Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay - called on their governments to submit an eventual continent-wide free trade treaty to national plebiscites.

NICARAGUA: Pentagon Contracts Nicaraguan Sweatshops
by Steven GreenhouseThe New York Times
December 3rd, 2000
An arm of the Pentagon has come under fire for procuring large quantities of apparel from a Nicaraguan factory that labor rights groups say is a sweatshop and that the United States trade representative has voiced serious concerns about.

Zambia: Toxics Worry Critics of African Free Trade Pact
by Singy HayonaEnvironment News Service
November 28th, 2000
Environmentalists in Zambia are concerned that a new free trade agreement will open the floodgates for dangerous imported products and industrial wastes.

US: Student Movement is Thriving After Seattle
by Bhumika MuchhalaBoulder Daily Camera
November 25th, 2000
Nov. 30 is the first anniversary of the ''Battle of Seattle.'' As thousands of students joined with trade unionists, environmentalists and others to demonstrate against the World Trade Organization, a new era of protest was dawning.

US: Seattle WTO Protests Mark New Activist Age
by Luis CabreraAssociated Press
November 25th, 2000
The protests that all but shut down last year's World Trade Organization meeting may have been a surprise, but they were no fluke, organizers and observers say.

BRUNEI: Clinton Urges Economic Globalization
by Dirk BeveridgeAssociated Press
November 15th, 2000
President Clinton sought to nudge economic globalization forward Wednesday by calling for new world trade negotiations by 2001 -- a deadline developing nations are resisting.

Canada: Arctic Pollution Linked to Industrial Plants and Incinerators
by Danielle KnightInter Press Service
October 3rd, 2000
Toxic pollution that has mysteriously entered Canada's pristine Arctic region has now been linked to air emissions from specific municipal waste incinerators, cement kilns and industrial plants in the United States, Canada and Mexico, according to a new study released Tuesday.

US: Roundup of Student Activism Against Sweatshops
by Keith MeattoMother Jones
October 1st, 2000
This year's cause celebre was the campaign to end the use of sweatshop labor by the $2.5-billion collegiate apparel industry. Undergraduates nationwide demanded their colleges quit the Fair Labor Association (FLA) -- an industry-backed watchdog that opponents liken to a fox guarding the hen house -- and join the Worker Rights Consortium. Founded by students, academics, and labor unions last October, the WRC promises strict workplace oversight, free from industry influence.

AUSTRALIA: U.S. Soccer Players Confront Nike Protestors
Times of India
September 12th, 2000
This was Sunday, the day before the start of the three-day World Economic Forum in Melbourne, the same type of meeting that sparked riots in Seattle last year. The two players just happened to pass one of the demonstrations at a park.

Australia: Anti-Globalization Protestors Claim Victory
Agence France Presse
September 11th, 2000
Anti-globalisation campaigners claimed victory Monday after blockading a major international economic conference in a pitched battle with police in which scores of people were hurt.

USA: Billion Dollar NAFTA Challenge to California MTBE Ban
by Cat LazaroffEnvironment News Service
September 11th, 2000
The Canadian challenger, Methanex Corporation, has argued that a plan to remove the toxic chemical MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether) from California's gasoline violates the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

MEXICO: Country Ordered to Pay US Company $17 Million for NAFTA Violations
by Danielle KnightInter Press Service
August 31st, 2000
An international trade tribunal based here has ruled that Mexico violated the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and ordered the government to pay 16.7 million dollars to a US company.

NICARAGUA: US Retailers Contract with Sweatshops
by Carrie AntlfingerAssociated Press
August 22nd, 2000
Gonzalez was one of two workers invited Monday to recount conditions at two Nicaraguan factories that human rights, religious and labor groups claim supply Kohl's Department Stores with cheap garments.

SWITZERLAND: Report Calls WTO 'Nightmare'
by Robert EvansReuters
August 11th, 2000
A United Nations-appointed study team has labeled the World Trade Organization a ''nightmare'' for developing countries and suggested the body should be brought under the U.N.'s purview.

CHINA: China WTO Deal Imminent
Associated Press
August 1st, 2000
Mexico expects to sign an agreement with China ''very soon'' on the communist nation's entry into the World Trade Organization, Mexico's foreign minister said Tuesday.

FRANCE: José Bové a 'French Gandhi'?
by Charles BremnerTimes of London
July 1st, 2000
The anti-capitalist campaigner José Bové compared himself to Gandhi when he went on trial yesterday for demolishing a McDonald's restaurant in a southern French market town.

US: High Court Considers Massachusetts Anti-Burma Law
by Steven MufsonWashington Post
March 23rd, 2000
Tearing a page from the anti-apartheid movement, the two drew up legislation that penalized companies with ties to Burma when those firms competed for Massachusetts state contracts. Using the draft of an anti-apartheid bill, they crossed out South Africa and inserted Burma. Two years later, the measure became law.

CARIBBEAN: Banana Producers Fear Falling Victim to US-EU Trade War
by Brian KenetyInter Press Service
March 16th, 2000
A group of Caribbean banana-producing states fear that a prolonged lull in negotiations between the European Union (EU) and the United States over the EU's banana import regime could work against them.

USA: Clinton Backs Multinationals Against States in Challenge to Burma Sanctions
by Jim LobeInter Press Service
February 16th, 2000
In a major boost for the forces of economic globalisation, US President Bill Clinton has decided to back multinational corporations in a key court challenge to a Massachusetts law designed to promote democracy in Burma.

JAPAN: Officials Blamed for Promoting Toxic Incinerators in Thailand
Environment News Service
February 9th, 2000
Japan is using official lending agencies which provide development aid to promote the export of Japanese incinerators to Thailand, Greenpeace alleges.

WORLD: Critics Fear New Treaty Subordinates Biosafety to Trade
by Danielle KnightInter Press Service
February 1st, 2000
Environmental groups, while praising aspects of the first worldwide treaty governing trade in genetically modified organisms (GMO), criticise the scope of the agreement and worry it could be subverted by powerful free trade interests.

USA: Seattle Dismisses 280 WTO-related Cases
Associated Press
January 4th, 2000
Citing lack of evidence, the city attorney said Monday he was dropping about 280 cases against demonstrators who blocked the streets and demonstrated against the recent World Trade Organization meetings.

Bordering Injustice
by Traci Griggs and Martha ValdsLa Jornada
December 9th, 1998
Non-profit environmental justice groups such as the San Diego-based Environmental Health Coalition (EHC), are trying to remove the rose colored glasses and expose the harsh reality of the U.S/Mexico border in an attempt to protect public and environmental health. EHC's battle against an abandoned maquiladora turned toxic dump, serves as a microcosm of what's wrong with border health and how NAFTA, for the most part, has exacerbated the problem.

Double Standards: Notes for a Border Screenplay
by Debbie NathanTexas Observer
June 6th, 1997
The case had been settled only minutes ago, and now jurors for Mendoza v. Contico were seated in a room outfitted with movie theater chairs and plugs for devices like VCRs. They were in the ''Ceremonial Court'' in El Paso, where victorious lawyers often hold post-trial press conferences.