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JAMAICA: Regulators Mull Viability of Ferti-irrigation
by Patricia WilliamsIPS News
December 26th, 2007
Appleton Estates seemed to have solved the centuries old problem of what to do with distillery waste when they started a new project eight years ago. However, they are yet to convince regulators and locals that it is a viable option.

IRAQ: Sexual Violence: An Occupational Hazard -- In Iraq and at Home
by Marie TessierWomen's Media Center
December 26th, 2007
Jamie Leigh Jones was just 20 in 2005 when she took a leap of faith to work in Iraq for her employer, military contractor Kellogg, Brown & Root, then a subsidiary of Halliburton. She went on a mission she believed in. Shortly after her arrival in Iraq, however, Jones' ambitions were dashed in an alleged gang rape by co-workers.

EUROPE: Both Sides Cite Science to Address Altered Corn
by Elisabeth RosenthalNew York Times
December 26th, 2007
A proposal made by Europe’s top environment official, to ban the planting of a genetically modified corn strain produced by companies like Syngenta and Monsanto, sets up a bitter war within the European Union.

SOUTH KOREA: South Korea Arrests 2 Captains in Huge Oil Spill
Agence France Press
December 25th, 2007
The South Korean Coast Guard said Monday that it had arrested the captains of a barge owned by Samsung Heavy Industry and a tugboat that caused an oil spill this month, the nation’s worst.

IRAQ: Bosses didn't want to expose Iraqi police corruption
by Henry McDonald, Duncan Campbell and Richard Norton-TaylorThe Guardian
December 24th, 2007
"It appears that ArmorGroup, by taking on extra staff ... and quickly making some redundant, is essentially transferring the risk inherent in such contract work to employees while making fat profits for itself," his MP, Dr Phyllis Starkey, told the House of Commons earlier this year.

INDIA: Many rescued child laborers in India soon back at another dismal job
by Heidi J. ShragerChronicle Foreign Service
December 23rd, 2007
A 2006 report by the Child Welfare Committee found that 12 of 22 children from a village in the impoverished eastern state of Bihar were re-trafficked, mostly to different states, within a year after being rescued from a Delhi hand-embroidery sweatshop.

CHINA/US: The Recalls’ Aftershocks
by Louise Story and David BarbozaNew York Times
December 22nd, 2007
Toy makers are investigating whether they need to treat their tainted products with stabilization chemicals or if they must seal the toys in giant polyethylene bags.

CHINA: China Grabs West’s Smoke-Spewing Factories
by Joseph Kahn and Mark LandlerNew York Times
December 21st, 2007
In its rush to re-create the industrial revolution that made the West rich, China has absorbed most of the major industries that once made the West dirty.

EUROPE: Europe Proposes Binding Limits on Auto Emissions
by James KanterNew York Times
December 20th, 2007
European Union officials told leading automakers to make deep cuts in tailpipe emissions of the cars they produce or face fines that could reach billions of euros. Companies including Volkswagen and Renault immediately promised a fight to weaken the proposed legislation.

PNG: Govt Warns Public To Stay Away From Barrick Gold's Porgera Mine
by Alexander RheeneyThe Pacific Magazine
December 18th, 2007
The Papua New Guinea government has appealed to the public to keep away from the Porgera gold mine after security guards shot dead an alleged illegal miner.

GLOBAL: Mining Firms Bulk Up, Echoing Big Oil Mergers
by Patrick Barta and Robert Guy MatthewsWall Street Journal
December 18th, 2007
Mining are embarking on another round of deals that promises industry juggernauts with great influence over the cost of raw materials -- and, by extension, the price of consumer electronics, cars and new apartment blocks.

KUWAIT: How Iraq Conflict Rewards A Kuwaiti Merchant Family
by CAM SIMPSON and GLENN R. SIMPSONWall Street Journal
December 17th, 2007
Federal prosecutors in Atlanta are looking into whether Public Warehousing and another family-dominated company, Sultan Center Food Products Co., colluded to gouge the U.S. military.

US: Wider Spying Fuels Aid Plan for Telecom Industry
by Eric Lichtblau, James Risen and Scott ShaneNew York Times
December 16th, 2007
The Bush administration is waging a high-profile campaign to persuade Congress to pass legislation protecting companies from lawsuits for aiding the National Security Agency's warrantless eavesdropping program. At stake is the federal government's partnership with industry to conduct a wide range of secret surveillance operations in fighting terrorism and crime.

US: U.S. paid $32M for Iraqi base that wasn't built
by Matt KelleyUSA Today
December 14th, 2007
The U.S. military paid a Florida company nearly $32 million to build barracks and offices for Iraqi army units even though nothing was ever built, Pentagon investigators reported.

US: Charity’s Share From Shopping Raises Concern
by Stephanie StromNew York Times
December 13th, 2007
Increasingly, nonprofit experts are questioning one of the fastest-growing sectors of giving, the practice of building a donation into the purchase of items. Such giving is unregulated and, in most cases, unaccountable — and no one knows who, if anyone, is claiming a tax deduction for it.

UK: The Biggest Global Warming Crime in History
by Cahal MilmoIndependent (UK)
December 13th, 2007
BP is accused of investing a large sum of money to extract oil from the Canadian wilderness using environmentally unsound methods.

US: Senator Says Wal-Mart Sells Products From Sweatshops
by ReutersNew York Times
December 13th, 2007
A Democratic senator said Wednesday that Christmas tree ornaments sold at Wal-Mart Stores and other major retailers were made in a Chinese sweatshop.

US: House Panel Looking Into Charges by Former KBR Employee
by Justin RoodABC News
December 13th, 2007
A House panel is looking into charges of sexual assault made by a former Halliburton/KBR employee in Iraq.

US: A World Consumed by Guilt
by Eric WilsonNew York Times
December 13th, 2007
Buying green may not be so easy.

US: Group: Wal-Mart Blind to Illegal Logging
by Marcus KabelForbes.com
December 12th, 2007
A nonprofit group has found that Wal Mart's wood products use timber from a Russian region rife with illegal logging.

US: Wary of Protests, Exxon Plans Natural Gas Terminal in the Atlantic
by Jads MouawadNew York Times
December 12th, 2007
Exxon Mobil would like to build a $1 billion floating terminal for liquefied natural gas about 20 miles off the coast of New Jersey.

US: DOJ Questioned About '05 Iraq Rape Case
by John PorrettoAP News
December 12th, 2007
The chairman of the House Judiciary Committee asked the Justice Department on Tuesday to give a full account of its investigation into the alleged rape of a female contract worker in Iraq two years ago.

US: Class-Action Bias Suit Against Wal-Mart Reaffirmed
by ReutersNew York Times
December 12th, 2007
Wal-Mart Stores suffered a legal setback on Tuesday in its attempt to head off the biggest sexual discrimination case in United States history when an appeals court allowed the case to remain a class-action lawsuit.

US: Black Given Prison Term Over Fraud
by Tim ArangoNew York Times
December 11th, 2007
Conrad M. Black is handed down a 6 1/2 year prison sentence for removing 13 boxes of documents from the office of his media company, Hollinter International.

GLOBAL: Big Oil lets sun set on renewables
by Terry MacalisterGuardian (UK)
December 11th, 2007
Shell, the oil company that recently trumpeted its commitment to a low carbon future by signing a pre-Bali conference communique, has quietly sold off most of its solar business. Rival BP decided last week to invest in the world's dirtiest oil production in Canada's tar sands, indicating that Big Oil might be giving up its flirtation with renewables and going back to its roots.

NIGERIA: Nigeria suspends Siemens dealings
BBC News
December 11th, 2007
Nigeria has cancelled a contract with Siemens and suspended dealings with the German telecoms firm pending an investigation into bribery allegations.

US: Disputed in Iraq, Blackwater Now Splits California Town
by Salomon MooreNew York Times
December 11th, 2007
A small community in southern California is upset at the prospect of a Blackwater training camp moving into town.

US: Victim: Gang-Rape Cover-Up by U.S., Halliburton/KBR
by Brian Ross, Maddy Sauer & Justin RoodABC News
December 10th, 2007
A Houston, Texas woman says she was gang-raped by Halliburton/KBR coworkers in Baghdad, and the company and the U.S. government are covering up the incident.

US: Wal-Mart Takes Image Hit From Shank Case
by Kimberly MorrisonThe Morning News
December 7th, 2007
Wal-Mart won a lawsuit against a former employee, injured in an accident that left her brain damaged, divorced and penniless, for reimbursement from her medical care.

UK: Supermarkets admit milk price fix
BBC News
December 7th, 2007
Supermarket firms Sainsbury's and Asda have admitted that they were part of a dairy price-fixing group that earned about £270m extra from shoppers.

US: The Army's $200 Billion Makeover
by Alec KleinWashington Post
December 7th, 2007
A $200 billion plan to remake the largest war machine in history unfolds in one small way on a quiet country road in the Chihuahuan Desert.

CANADA: Gov't Urged to Rein in Mining Sector
by Am JohalIPS News
December 7th, 2007
Canadian mining companies continue to come under scrutiny from civil society organisations for international human rights violations and environmental damage that critics say the Canadian government has done little to check.

GLOBAL: 'MNCs Gaining Total Control Over Farming'
by Anil NettoIPS News
December 7th, 2007
Food security campaigners are now more concerned than ever that farmers are turning dependent on large multinational corporations (MNCs) for seeds, fertilisers, pesticides and other inputs while also becoming more vulnerable to pressures to produce genetically engineered crops.

US: Former Chief Will Forfeit $418 Million
by Eric DashNew York Times
December 7th, 2007
The former chief executive of UnitedHealth Group agrees to settle claims related to back-dated stock options.

US: Shoshone Use Film, Courts to Fight Barrick Gold Mine on Sacred Land
by Lisa J. WolfEnviroment News Service
December 6th, 2007
"Our Land, Our Life," a 74 minute documentary directed by George and Beth Gage, details Carrie and Mary Dann's 30 year struggle to protect their traditional ways and ancestral lands from mining degradation in a battle that went to the U.S. Supreme Court and beyond to the United Nations with no relief as yet from the U.S. government.

SOUTH KOREA: Tired of Corruption but Afraid of the Crackdown
by Choe Sang-HunNew York Times
December 4th, 2007
Manufacturing giant Samsung faces accusations of corruption.

US: Life Was Lost in Maelstrom of Suspicion
by Ginger Thompson and Eric SchmittNew York Times
December 4th, 2007
The suicide of a top Air Force procurement officer casts a cloud of suspicion, threatening to plunge a service still struggling to emerge from one of its worst scandals into another quagmire.

IVORY COAST: The Bitter Taste of Cocoa in Côte d'Ivoire
by Michael DeibertIPS News
December 3rd, 2007
In addition to funding conflict, cocoa revenues are believed to have been defrauded for enrichment of persons in both the government and rebel camps. Article also mentions the following corporations: Lev-Ci and Cargill.

SINGAPORE: Neste to build $814 mln Singapore biofuel plant
by Tarmo VirkiThe Guardian
November 30th, 2007
Finnish refiner Neste Oil is working to build the world's largest biodiesel plant amongst controversy over the environmental impact of palm oil plants.

US: Producer of Poisonous Toy Beads Issues Apology
by Keith BradsherNew York Times
November 29th, 2007
The Hong Kong company that manufactured millions of poisonous toy beads in mainland China issued a public apology on Thursday, with the chairman saying that it had not occurred to anyone to check whether an inexpensive glue ingredient in the beads would be dangerous for children to eat.

AFGHANISTAN: NATO Airstrike Kills 14 Afghans
by Abdul Waheed WafaNew York Times
November 29th, 2007
A NATO airstrike killed 14 laborers working for an Afghan road construction company that had been contracted by the United States Army Corps of Engineers.

US: Google launches search for energy solutions
by Bob KeefePalm Beach Post
November 28th, 2007
Google is going ga-ga over green energy.

EU: EU Fines 4 Glassmakers for Price-Fixing
by Constant BrandAP
November 28th, 2007
A U.S. company that makes glass is accused of price fixing by European regulators.

FRANCE: China Deal Gives Lift to Revival of Fission
by John TagliabueNew York Times
November 27th, 2007
Critics question recent deal between French nuclear power giant Areva and China's leading nuclear power company.

GLOBAL: Global campaign vows to fight MNC drug monopoly
by Marwaan Macan-Markar IPS News
November 26th, 2007
Public health and HIV/AIDS activists from the developing world are seeking to break the monopoly over drugs held by pharmaceutical giants through a new global campaign designed to influence international debate over the issue.

US: Blackwater Probe Stifled by Conflicts
by Richard LardnerAssociated Press
November 26th, 2007
A Blackwater weapons probe continues to be bogged down after months of strained relations between Bush administration officials.

US: New York Manhole Covers, Forged Barefoot in India
by Heather Timmons and J. Adam HugginsNew York Times
November 26th, 2007
Companies responsible for the manufacturing of manholes are criticized over worker conditions in India, where manufacturing takes place.javascript:change_form_block( 'location_trigger' );

US: One big country club: A UK marketing group leads the field in Washington power game
by Stephanie KirchgaessnerFinancial Times
November 26th, 2007
UK marketing group, WPP exerts political influence in Washington DC on a number of controversial issues, including gun control.

INDONESIA: Police and border guard stop Greenpeace demonstration near Porvoo refinery
Helsingin Sanomat
November 26th, 2007
Greenpeace demonstrators and police came to a head over protests against a major palm oil producer in Indonesia.

UK: Payload: Taking Aim at Corporate Bribery
by Nelson D. Schwarts and Lowell BergmanNew York Times
November 25th, 2007
Controversial financial ties between British military contracting giant, BAE Systems, and Downing Street in Saudi Arabia attract attention during King Abdullah's visit to Buckingham Palace.

CHINA: China Shows High Interest in African Oil
by Benoit FauconWall Street Journal
November 22nd, 2007
Royal Dutch Shell is considering selling interests in two Nigerian offshore oil blocks to China's Cnooc Ltd. as it restructures its business in the troubled region.

UK: Severn Trent hit with criminal charges
by Graeme WeardenThe Guardian (UK)
November 22nd, 2007
Severn Trent Water has been charged with three criminal offences of supplying water regulator Ofwat with inaccurate data on water leakages over several years.

ECUADOR: No Dial Tone, No Contract
by Kintto LucasInter Press News Service (IPS)
November 21st, 2007
The possible cancellation of the mobile telephone operating licence granted by Ecuador to Porta Celular, a company indirectly owned by Mexican multi-millionaire Carlos Slim, could set a precedent in Latin America.

US: Law firm seeks nearly $700 mil for Enron pacts
by Martha GraybowReuters
November 21st, 2007
The law firm that helped win $7.2 billion in settlements for Enron investors is seeking nearly $700 million in legal fees for itself and other attorneys who handled the case, according to court documents.

US: Border Fence Work Raises Environmental Concerns
by Randal C. ArchiboldNew York Times
November 21st, 2007
Environmental groups, elected officials and local Indian tribes criticize the Department of Homeland Security over environmental concerns related to fencing along the U.S.-Mexico border.

INDONESIA: Indonesia palm oil tanker dodges Greenpeace blockade
Reuters
November 17th, 2007
Greenpeace vowed on Saturday to keep up a blockade on a key palm oil port in Indonesia's Sumatra as part of protest against forest destruction, as a tanker it had been trying to block for three days managed to leave the port.

US: Gap Campaigns Against Child Labor
by Amelia GentlemanNew York Times
November 15th, 2007
Gap has begun an effort to rebuild its reputation after a child-labor scandal in India.

COLOMBIA: Victims of Colombian Conflict Sue Chiquita Brands
New York Times
November 14th, 2007
Victims of Colombia’s civil conflict sued the banana importer Chiquita Brands International yesterday, accusing it of making payments to a paramilitary group responsible for thousands of killings.

GERMANY: Get Rich or Die Trying
by John Goetz and Conny NeumannDer Spiegel
November 12th, 2007
Germany companies send mercenaries to Iraq.

US: Army may ban security firm from contracts; Executive accused of using information gained during affair
by Matt KelleyUSA Today
November 12th, 2007
The Army has threatened to ban a private security firm in Iraq from government work because an executive allegedly got inside information to win $2.5 million in contracts, Army records show.

US: Failure to Launch: In Death of Spy Satellite Program, Lofty Plans and Unrealistic Bids
by Philip TaubmanNew York Times
November 11th, 2007
Collapse of a government funded project to build new spy satellites was all but inevitable.

US: Intel official: Say goodbye to privacy
by Pamela Hess Associated Press
November 11th, 2007
Privacy no longer can mean anonymity, says Donald Kerr, the principal deputy director of national intelligence. Instead, it should mean that government and businesses properly safeguards people's private communications and financial information.

DRC: Six arrested in Congo radioactive dumping scandal
by Joe BavierReuters
November 10th, 2007
Congolese authorities arrested six people in connection with the dumping of tonnes of highly radioactive minerals into a river near the southeastern town of Likasi. A report said some 17 tons of the minerals confiscated were destined for Chinese firm Magma.

UK: Weapons firm's role in St Athan academy condemned
by Martin ShiptonWestern Mail
November 9th, 2007
Campaigners have condemned the Assembly Government for backing a huge military training project, despite the involvement of a weapons company previously linked to cluster bombs.

US: Merck Agrees to Settle Vioxx Suits for $4.85 Billion
by Alex BarensonNew York Times
November 9th, 2007
Three years after withdrawing its pain medication Vioxx from the market, Merck has agreed to pay $4.85 billion to settle 27,000 lawsuits by people who claim they or their family members suffered injury or died after taking the drug.

EU: Court hits at Brussels secrecy
by Andy BoundsFinancial Times
November 8th, 2007
The European Union's secretive decision-making processes were condemned on Thursday in a legal judgment that should lead to more light being shed on how thousands of regulations affecting businesses are hatched.

US: Mom: Chemical-Laced Toy Made Son 'Drunk'
by Dikky SinnWashington Post
November 7th, 2007
Chemical on toy beads makes children sick.

US: Louisiana Charges Price Fixing by Insurers
New York Times
November 7th, 2007
The Louisiana attorney general sues the state’s largest property insurance companies for engaging in an elaborate price-fixing scheme.

US: A Story of Surveillance: Former Technician 'Turning In' AT&T Over NSA Program
by Ellen NakashimaWashington Post
November 7th, 2007
Telecommunication firm AT&T allowed NSA to access emails and search other internet records of telecom companies without their knowledge.

US: Coal-Funded Ad Is Called Misleading
by Steven MufsonWashington Post
November 7th, 2007
A Kansas newspaper ad paid for by coal mining giant Peabody Energy uses Putin, Chavez and Ahmadinejad to counter calls for cleaner energy.

US: Yahoo plea over China rights case
BBC News
November 7th, 2007
Internet giant Yahoo has asked a US court to dismiss a lawsuit accusing it of complicity in rights abuses and acts of torture in China.

US: Banana Workers Get $3.3M In Pesticide Case
AP
November 7th, 2007
A Los Angeles jury awarded $3.3 million to six workers on Monday who claimed they were left sterile by a pesticide used at a banana plantation in Nicaragua operated by Dole Fresh Fruit Co.

PERU-IRAQ: A Year in Hell for 1,000 Dollars a Month
by Ángel PáezIPS News
November 7th, 2007
Poor well-trained ex guerrillas from Peru are easily recruited for security contract work in Iraq.

US: Defense contractor guilty in US lawmaker corruption scandal
AFP
November 7th, 2007
A former defense contractor was convicted by a San Diego court on Monday of bribing a jailed US lawmaker with 700,000 dollars in cash, gifts and prostitutes.

US: Fort Huachuca intelligence center draws private contractors
by Mike SunnucksPhoenix Business Journal
November 7th, 2007
An increasing amount of U.S. intelligence work -- including training related to aggressive interrogation methods -- is being parceled out to defense firms making Arizona's Fort Huachuca a major contracting hub.

SOUTH KOREA: Corruption scandal snowballs at Samsung Group in South Korea
by Choe Sang-HunInternational Herald Tribune
November 6th, 2007
A corruption scandal at Samsung Group, the South Korean conglomerate, snowballed Tuesday as prosecutors vowed to open a formal investigation into allegations that its chairman had masterminded a massive scheme of bribery and illegal transactions.

US: Whistleblowers claim contractor fraud ignored
by Guillermo ContrerasExpress News
November 5th, 2007
Whistleblower allegations against corporate wrongdoings in the War in Iraq are often swept under the rug by the U.S. Government.

US: Toxins Threaten to Uproot Entire Town
by Mark WeisenmillerIPS News
November 5th, 2007
The mostly African American citizens of a small town in rural Florida suffer severely because of a beryllium leak at a Lockheed Martin-owned plant.

US: Blackwater Mounts a Defense With Top Talent
by John M. Broder and James RisenNY Times
November 5th, 2007
lackwater Worldwide, its reputation in tatters and its lucrative government contracts in jeopardy, is mounting an aggressive legal, political and public relations counterstrike.

US: Gap plans 'sweatshop free' labels
by Dan McDougallGuardian
November 4th, 2007
In what would be the biggest commitment to ending child labour ever undertaken by a major retailer, Gap Inc is drawing up plans to label its products 'Sweatshop Free'.

US: Blackwater's Owner Has Spies for Hire
by Dana HedgpethWashington Post
November 3rd, 2007
The Prince Group, the holding company that owns Blackwater Worldwide, has been building an operation that will sniff out intelligence about natural disasters, business-friendly governments, overseas regulations and global political developments for clients in industry and government.

IRELAND: Irish subsidiary implicated in Saddam fraud
by Arthur BeesleyThe Irish Times
November 1st, 2007
The Irish subsidiary of US industrial group Ingersoll-Rand paid a $53,919 (EUR 37,235) "kickback" to Saddam Hussein's regime in Iraq in an effort to secure a UN contract, US regulators have claimed.

SOUTH AFRICA: Recriminations start as trapped miners are freed
by Basildon PetaIndependent
November 1st, 2007
The South African government shut down Elandsrand gold mine yesterday as the last of 3,200 miners trapped more than a mile underground made their way back to the surface after more than 36 hours underground.

US: Protest Leads Army to Reconsider Big Contract
by Dana HedgpethWashington Post
November 1st, 2007
One of the biggest military contracts to house, feed and provide other services to U.S. military troops in Iraq, Afghanistan and Kuwait may be canceled and renegotiated after the Government Accountability Office said yesterday that it upheld a protest from two teams that lost the bid.

CHINA: Chinese Chemicals Flow Unchecked to Market
by Walter BogdanichNY Times
October 31st, 2007
Pharmaceutical ingredients exported from China are often made by chemical companies that are neither certified nor inspected by Chinese drug regulators, The New York Times has found.

US: US soldier's family brings legal action against British private security firm
by Susan GoldenbergThe Guardian
October 30th, 2007
A British private security firm hired to protect the oil installations of post-invasion Iraq is being sued for causing the death of an American soldier.

US: Democrats Criticize Immunity Offers to Guards
by David JohnstonNY Times
October 30th, 2007
Prominent Democrats in Congress reacted angrily today to disclosures that State Department investigators made apparently unauthorized offers of immunity to Blackwater security guards.

US: Video Puts Canadian Part of Falls in US
by Matthew LeeThe Guardian
October 30th, 2007
The Bush administration appears to have annexed a major Canadian landmark as part of a slick new campaign to promote U.S. tourism and welcome foreign visitors to America.

US: Energy Dept. Audit Finds Overcharges On Contracts Alleged 'Padding' By KBR Affiliate
by Dana HedgpethWashington Post
October 30th, 2007
Energy Dept. Audit Finds Overcharges On Contracts Alleged 'Padding' By KBR Affiliate

US: Hearing on Beef Packaging Fails Activists' Smell Test
by Rick WeissWashington Post
October 30th, 2007
A congressional hearing on the use of carbon monoxide to keep meat looking fresh promises to be an odious affair.

GERMANY: FSC's 'Green' Label for Wood Products Gets Growing Pains
by Tom Wright and Jim CarltonWall Street Journal
October 30th, 2007
The Forest Stewardship Council -- a widely recognized third-party labeling system to identify "green" wood and paper products -- has acknowledged that some companies using its label are destroying pristine forests and says it plans to overhaul its rules.

US: Little Green Lies
by Ben ElginBusiness 2.0
October 29th, 2007
The notion that making a company environmentally friendly can be not just cost-effective but profitable is questioned.

US: Indian 'slave' children found making low-cost clothes destined for Gap
by Dan McDougallGuardian
October 28th, 2007
Child workers, some as young as 10, have been found working in a textile factory in conditions close to slavery to produce clothes that appear destined for Gap Kids.

US: BP fined $373m by US government
BBC News
October 26th, 2007
Oil giant BP has been fined a total of $373m (£182m) by the US Department of Justice for environmental crimes and committing fraud.

US: Rice Says ‘Hole’ in U.S. Law Shields Contractors in Iraq
by John M. BroderNY Times
October 26th, 2007
Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice conceded on Thursday that there was a “hole” in United States law that had allowed Blackwater USA employees and other armed contractors in Iraq to escape legal jeopardy for crimes possibly committed there.

UK: Peer was paid to introduce lobbyist to minister
by David Leigh and Rob EvansThe Guardian
October 26th, 2007
A Labour peer has admitted taking money to introduce an arms company lobbyist to the government minister in charge of weapons purchases.

US: US lawmakers plan squeeze on Chevron in Myanmar
AFP
October 24th, 2007
Proposed sanctions introduced in the US House of Representatives would pressure US energy giant Chevron to pull its investment from Myanmar, which rights activists say is helping prop up the ruling military junta.

US: BP Settlements Seen on Safety and Price Cases
by Stephen Labaton and Lowell BergmanNY Times
October 24th, 2007
The British energy company BP, tarnished by a string of costly legal problems, is preparing to settle accusations that it was criminally indifferent to worker safety and that it manipulated energy prices.

US: Lessons Even Thomas Could Learn
by David LeonhardtNY Times
October 24th, 2007
Toy manufacturer RC2 recalls toys due to lead content, replacing them with new lead-contaminated toys.

US: F.D.A. Panel Urges Ban on Medicine for Child Colds
by Gardiner HarrisNY Times
October 20th, 2007
A Food and Drug Administration advisory panel voted Friday to ban popular over-the-counter cold products intended for children under the age of 6.

US: Fight Against Coal Plants Draws Diverse Partners
by Susan MoranNY Times
October 20th, 2007
Western anti-coal coalitions of environmentalists and non-environmentalists are becoming more effective at dampening new efforts to build coal plants.

US: Clinton Bucks The Trend and Rakes in Cash From The US Weapons Industry
by Leonard DoyleThe Independent (UK)
October 19th, 2007
The US arms industry is backing Hillary Clinton for President and has all but abandoned its traditional allies in the Republican party.

US: Houston Businessman Is Key Figure In U.S. Probe of Iraq Food Contracts
by Glenn R. SimpsonWall Street Journal
October 18th, 2007
As federal authorities probe the web of food suppliers for U.S. troops in Iraq, one focus of scrutiny is a Lebanese-American businessman indicted for allegedly inflating food prices with fraudulent bills.

US: V.A. Is Limiting Use of Diabetes Drug
by Stephanie SaulNY Times
October 18th, 2007
The Department of Veterans Affairs has decided to severely limit the use of Avandia, the once-popular drug for Type 2 diabetes, delivering another blow to the product’s maker, GlaxoSmithKline.

US: Homeland Security's Use of Contractors Is Questioned
by Spencer S. HsuWashington Post
October 17th, 2007
DHS attempts to address concerns over contractor accountability.

INDIA: A Backlash for Big Retail in India
by Madhur SinghNew Delhi Times
October 17th, 2007
Supermarkets open across the country and international big box stores partner with smaller local stores to gain a toehold in the market.

US: Food Companies Face U.S. Probe Over Iraq Deals
by Glen R. SimpsonWall Street Journal
October 16th, 2007
Prominent American food companies are under scrutiny in a federal probe of possible fraud and corruption in the military's food-supply operations for the Iraq war.

NAMIBIA: All Hiring for Iraq Halted
by Brigitte WeidlichThe Namibian
October 16th, 2007
A Namibian labour hire company, which processed the applications of Namibian ex-combatants who wanted to become 'security' guards in Iraq and Afghanistan, has stopped the process.

US: Verizon Says It Turned Over Data Without Court Orders
by Ellen NakashimaWashington Post
October 16th, 2007
Firm's Letter to Lawmakers Details Government Requests

US: Pentagon probes contractor fraud on Kuwait base
by Matt KelleyUSA Today
October 15th, 2007
Dozens of investigations turn up ties to U.S. Army's Camp Arifjan.

US: Blackwater vies for jobs beyond security
by August ColeWall Street Journal
October 15th, 2007
Even as Blackwater USA works to recover from criticism of its private-security forces in Iraq, the company plans for an expansion into other areas.

US: Companies go green: Greenquest or greenwash?
by Jill JamesFinancial Times
October 15th, 2007
Are companies going green to protect their reputations rather than being genuinely concerned for the environment?

US: US green groups urge Toyota U-turn
by John ReedFinancial Times
October 15th, 2007
Toyota is scrambling to protect its green reputation in the US, its largest market, where environmental groups are urging it to drop its opposition to a draft fuel economy bill.

US: We are overpaid say executives
by Francesco GuerreraFinancial Times
October 15th, 2007
Most US corporate leaders believe chief executives are overpaid, according to a study.

IRAQ:2 Women Killed in Security Shooting Are Buried in Iraq
by Andrew E. Kramer and James GlanzNY Times
October 11th, 2007
Two women killed Tuesday by a barrage of gunfire from private security guards in central Baghdad are buried there.

CANADA: Newmont joins the gold rush to Nunavut
by Richard Blackwell and Andy HoffmanGlobe and Mail
October 10th, 2007
Newmont Mining Corp. looks into a previously undeveloped gold deposit in Nunavut, Vancouver as a potential new gold mining hot spot.

CHINA: China Takes Aim at U.S. on Quality Control Amid Criticism Over Recalls
by Nicholas ZamiskaWall Street Journal
October 10th, 2007
The Chinese government, scrambling to counter a storm of criticism over the safety of the nation's exports, is now taking aim at products sent to China from some of America's largest companies.

UK: From $1 firm, Lord Ashcroft nets £132m
by Simon BowersGuardian (UK)
October 9th, 2007
The UK's Lord Ashcroft, the Conservative party deputy chairman and major donor, has agreed to sell his loss-making US janitorial business in a deal that will bring him a £132m windfall.

RUSSIA: Siberian boom threatens traditions
by Tom EsslemontBBC News
October 8th, 2007
Russia is forging ahead with ambitious energy projects in eastern Siberia, but the indigenous Evenk people are complaining that their age-old way of life is in danger.

GERMANY:Siemens Settlement Sets Off Criticism of German Inquiries
by David Crawford and Mike EsterlWall Street Journal
October 8th, 2007
In the wake of a settlement between Siemens AG and German authorities over one aspect of a bribes-for-business scandal, critics are saying the sanction is light given the scale of the alleged crime and reflects how difficult it is for local law enforcement to pursue corporate corruption.

US: CEO pay disparity rears its head
by  Francesco Guerrera and Daniel PimlottFinancial Times
October 8th, 2007
The question of "internal pay equity" continues to climb the corporate governance agenda.

SOUTH AFRICA: Old perils resurface as trapped S African miners emerge alive
by Alec Russell in CarletonvilleFinancial Times
October 5th, 2007
Old perils resurface as trapped S African miners emerge alive.

US: 77 multi-million dollar suits filed against Monsanto
by Chris DickersonWV Record
October 5th, 2007
A Charleston attorney has filed more than 70 cancer lawsuits against Monsanto and related companies over its old plant in Nitro.

BURMA: Criticism of Total Operations Grows
by Michael DiebertIPS
October 4th, 2007
The Yadana natural gas pipeline runs through the heart of the debate on corporate responsibility as to how foreign businesses should operate in a country ruled by a military dictatorship accused of widespread human rights abuses and violent suppression of dissent within its borders.

CONGO: World Bank accused of razing Congo forests
by John VidalThe Guardian (UK)
October 4th, 2007
The World Bank encouraged foreign companies to destructively log the world's second largest forest, endangering the lives of thousands of Congolese Pygmies, according to a report on an internal investigation by senior bank staff and outside experts.

US: Wal-Mart Workers Win $62 Million
by Marieclaire DaleAP
October 4th, 2007
Wal-Mart workers in Pennsylvania who previously won a $78.5 million class-action award for working off the clock will share an additional $62.3 million in damages, a judge ruled Wednesday.

US: The People vs. the Profiteers
by David RoseVanity Fair
October 4th, 2007
Americans working in Iraq for Halliburton spin-off KBR have been outraged by the massive fraud they saw there. Dozens are suing the giant military contractor, on the taxpayers' behalf. Whose side is the Justice Department on?

IRAQ: From Errand to Fatal Shot to Hail of Fire to 17 Deaths
by James Glanz and Alissa J. RubinNY Times
October 3rd, 2007
Witness accounts give new details in the Blackwater shooting in Nisour Square.

US:Nike Adds Indian Artifacts to Its Swoosh
by Andrew A. GreenNY Times
October 3rd, 2007
To the amusement of some and the disapproval of other, Nike introduces a shoe designed specifically for American Indians, complete with arrowheads and feathers.

US: Chief of Blackwater Defends His Employees
by John M. BroderNew York Times
October 2nd, 2007
Erik D. Prince, chief executive of Blackwater USA, told a Congressional committee on Tuesday that his company’s nearly 1,000 armed guards in Iraq were not trigger-happy mercenaries, but rather loyal Americans doing a necessary job in hostile territory.

US: U.S. Pays Steep Price for Private Security in Iraq
by Walter PincusWashington Post
October 1st, 2007
It costs the U.S. government a lot more to hire contract employees as security guards in Iraq than to use American troops.

INDIA: Child labour on the rise in cottonfields
by Ch Prashanth ReddyBusiness Standard
October 1st, 2007
More than 416,000 children under the age of 18, of whom almost 225,000 are younger than 14, are involved in child labour in India's cottonseed production. Most of them are girls.

US: Billions over Baghdad; The Spoils of War
by Donald L. Barlett and James B. SteeleVanity Fair
October 1st, 2007
Between April 2003 and June 2004, $12 billion in U.S. currency--much of it belonging to the Iraqi people--was shipped from the Federal Reserve to Baghdad, where it was dispensed by the Coalition Provisional Authority. Incredibly, at least $9 billion has gone missing, unaccounted for, in a frenzy of mismanagement and greed.

US: State Dept. Tallies 56 Shootings Involving Blackwater on Diplomatic Guard Duty
by James RisenNY Times
September 28th, 2007
The State Department said Thursday that Blackwater USA security personnel had been involved in 56 shootings while guarding American diplomats in Iraq so far this year.

BURMA: Total says pulling out would raise hardship
by Ed CrooksFinancial Times
September 28th, 2007
Total of France, which operates a natural gas project in Burma, has expressed its "deep concern" over the situation in the country but rejected the idea it should pull out.

RUSSIA: Energomash Says It Was Asked for $10M Bribe
by Anatoly MedetskyMoscow Times
September 28th, 2007
Engineering company NPO Energomash reports that it was approached for a large bribe to reinstate its export license.

IRAQ: Iraqis describe violence by private U.S. security guards
by Leila FadelSeattle Times
September 28th, 2007
Acts of violence committed by Blackwater security guards, charged with protecting U.S. diplomats are described by Iraqi victims.

FRANCE: Total: No Capital Expenditures in Myanmar
Associated Press
September 27th, 2007
Total SA, reacting Thursday to comments by French President Sarkozy urging the oil and gas giant to refrain from new investment in Myanmar, said it had not made any capital expenditure there since 1998. The military junta that rules Myanmar this week escalated its efforts to repress pro-democracy demonstrations led by thousands of Buddhist monks.

US: Green group attacks oil giant on climate research
by Alison BenjaminGuardian Unlimited
September 26th, 2007
An environmental group today took aim at ExxonMobil with the launch of an online video attacking the oil giant's green credentials.

US: 73,000 U.A.W. Members Go on Strike Against G.M.
by Michelle MaynardNew York Times
September 25th, 2007
The United Automobile Workers union wielded its most potent weapon against General Motors yesterday, sending 73,000 workers to picket lines in its first national strike at G.M. since 1970.

US: Software maker admits to taking bribes
by Stephanie KirchgaessnerFinancial Times
September 25th, 2007
An oil and gas services company owned by a US buy-out firm on Monday admitted it sought to bribe officials connected to several nationally owned oil companies to improve sales of its software, including Kazakhstan’s KazMunaiGas and subsidiaries of China’s CNOOC.

US: UAW Workers Walk Off the Job
by John D. Stoll and Jeffrey McCrackenWall Street Journal
September 24th, 2007
The decision Monday by the United Auto Workers to walk off the job at General Motors highlights yet again the divisive element of healthcare in labor relations, and how what began as a historic accident is now the single biggest liability for both businesses and workers.

US: Cribs Recalled After Deaths of 2 Children
by Michael M. Grynbaumnytimes
September 24th, 2007
One million cribs designed by Simplicity for Children, a manufacturer based in Pennsylvania, have been recalled after the suffocation deaths of at least two children, the government said yesterday. It was the company’s fourth recall in a little more than two years.

US: Graft in Military Contracts Spread From Base
by Ginger Thompson and Eric SchmitNew York Times
September 24th, 2007
A US major is arrested in relation to a bribery scheme involving companies seeking military contracts.

US: Advertising Company Will Monitor Phone Calls to Tailor Ads
by Louise Story New York Times
September 24th, 2007
Company plans to introduce an internet phone service that will be supported by advertising targeted to what people say in their phone conversations.

US: Wal-Mart maps out grand plan to go greener
by Fiona Harvey and Jonathan BirchallFinancial Times
September 24th, 2007
Wal-Mart will set out how it will cut costs by measuring and reducing greenhouse gas emissions throughout its supply chain Monday.

IRAQ: Blackwater Shooting Crisis Rallies Baghdad
by Philip ShishkinWall Street Journal
September 24th, 2007
An escalating controversy over the alleged shooting of Iraqi civilians by a U.S. security firm has triggered the strongest challenge yet to legal immunity for some foreigners in Iraq, while providing a rare rallying cry for the country's polarized factions.

US: Lockheed Looks Beyond Weapon: Contractor Targets Growth With Services in Strife-Torn Areas
by August ColeWall Street Journal
September 24th, 2007
Lockheed looks to secure more U.S. government contracts for other services from managing military bases and embassies to helping writing constitutions for developing nations.

US: U.S. probes Blackwater weapons shipments
by Joseph NeffNews & Observer (North Carolina)
September 22nd, 2007
The U.S. government is investigating whether private military contractor Blackwater USA, blamed for the deaths of 11 Iraqis in Baghdad on Sunday, has been shipping unlicensed automatic weapons and military goods to Iraq.

US: Head of firm paid to track Iraq spending investigated
by Matt KelleyUSA Today
September 21st, 2007
The head of a firm hired to audit Iraqi reconstruction spending is under investigation for violation of conflict of interest laws.

US: BAE faces class-action suit in America
by Josephine MouldsThe Daily Telegraph (UK)
September 21st, 2007
BAE Systems is facing a class-action lawsuit in the US related to alleged bribery, which could lift the lid on the inner workings of the defence company.

US: Embattled Siemens hires general counsel
by Simon ThielBloomberg News
September 20th, 2007
In an attempt to tighten controls and improve its image following a bribery investigation that began last year, a German engineering company appoints new board members and senior managers.

US: Evoking Vietnam clash, Wisconsin students to protest Halliburton visit
by Ryan J. Foley, APHouston Chronicle
September 19th, 2007
Students at Madison protest against Halliburton Co. recruiters, evoking memories of a 1967 protest of Dow, which made napalm for the US military.

IRAQ: Big oil’s waiting game over Iraq’s reserves
by Ed Crooks and Sheila McNultyFinancial Times
September 19th, 2007
Oil companies face a dilemma in Iraq over whether to wait for a new oil law which will give them a legal framework in which to operate or to sign agreements now with the Kurdistan Regional Government at the risk of sullying relations with Baghdad and the rest of the country.

IRAQ: Iraqi Report Says Blackwater Guards Fired First
by Sabrina Tavernise and James GlanzNew York Times
September 19th, 2007
A preliminary Iraqi report says that Blackwater security guards needlessly fired at a car, killing a couple and their infant.

US: Families Cannot Sue Firm for Israel Deaths
by Ed PilkingtonGuardian (London)
September 19th, 2007
The parents of Rachel Corrie, the US peace activist who was crushed to death four years ago in the then Israeli-occupied Gaza as she was protesting against the demolition of Palestinian homes, have been refused permission to sue the company which made the bulldozer that killed her.

EUROPE: Microsoft Ruling May Bode Ill for Other Companies
by Kevin J. O'Brien and Steve LohrNew York Times
September 18th, 2007
Europe’s second-highest court delivered a stinging rebuke to Microsoft Monday, but the impact of the decision upholding an earlier antitrust ruling may extend well beyond the world’s largest software maker to other high-technology companies.

US: U.S. Contractor Banned by Iraq Over Shootings
by Sabrina TaverniseNew York Times
September 18th, 2007
Blackwater USA, an American contractor that provides security to some of the top American officials in Iraq, has been banned from working in the country by the Iraqi government after a shooting that left eight Iraqis dead and involved an American diplomatic convoy.

IRAQ: Will Iraq Kick Out Blackwater?
by Adam Zagorin and Brian BennettTIME Magazine
September 17th, 2007
TIME has obtained an incident report prepared by the U.S. government describing a fire fight Sunday in Baghdad in which at least eight Iraqis were reported killed and 13 wounded. The loss of life has provoked anger in Baghdad, where the Interior Ministry has suspended Blackwater's license to operate around the country.

US: In Turnaround, Industries Seek Regulations
by Eric Lipton and Gardiner HarrisNew York Times
September 16th, 2007
After years of favoring the hands-off doctrine of the Bush administration, some of the nation's biggest industries are pushing for something they have long resisted: new federal regulations.

US: US accountants charged in probe
BBC News Online
September 14th, 2007
US financial regulators have charged 69 firms for breaking new corporate laws brought in after a wave of scandals.

CANADA: Four Former Nortel Executives Charged With Accounting Fraud
Associated Press
September 13th, 2007
The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has charged four more former Nortel Networks Corp. executives with accounting fraud, alleging they manipulated reserves to change Nortel's earnings statements on the orders of more senior officers of the Canadian networking equipment maker.

US: '60s Figure Says He Financed Donor Hsu
by Ianthe Jeanne Dugan and Brody MullinsWall Street Journal
September 12th, 2007
A company controlled by Democratic Party donor Norman Hsu recently received $40 million from a Madison Avenue investment fund run by Joel Rosenman, who was one of the creators of the Woodstock rock festival in 1969. That money, Mr. Rosenman told investors this week, is missing.

US: Whistle-blowers remain in the line of fire
by Jeremy GrantFinancial Times
September 12th, 2007
When the Securities and Exchange Commission came under congressional fire this year for its handling of an insider trading probe into hedge fund Pequot Capital, Senator Charles Grassley said the episode showed that whistle-blowers were "as welcome as a skunk at a picnic".

US: NASA gives Google founders a coveted parking place for their private jet
by Miguel HelftInternational Herald Tribune
September 12th, 2007
In the annals of perks enjoyed by American corporate executives, the founders of Google may have set a new standard: an un-crowded, federally-managed runway for their private jet that is as close as can be to being in the company's own backyard.

CHINA: An Opportunity for Wall St. in China’s Surveillance Boom
by Keith BradsherNew York Times
September 11th, 2007
China Security and Surveillance Technology, a fast-growing company that installs and sometimes operates surveillance systems for Chinese police agencies, jails and banks, has just been approved for a listing on the New York Stock Exchange. The company’s listing is just a sign of ever-closer ties among Wall Street, surveillance companies and the Chinese government’s security apparatus.

CHILE: Pascua Lama payoff disputed by Chile locals
by Trey PollardSantiago Times/El Mercurio
September 11th, 2007
Huasco Valley property owners who live below the Pascua Lama gold mine and administer US$3 million yearly in “hush” money given them by mine owner Barrick Gold charged this weekend that their predecessors used Barrick’s money for personal gain.

INDONESIA: Mr. Clean: Accused of Poisoning Indonesian Villagers, Rick Ness Tries to Prove His Innocence
by David CaseMother Jones magazine
September 10th, 2007
Ever since Rick Ness was accused of contaminating pristine Indonesian water, he's been spending a million a month to convince the world that he's innocent. And once you meet him, you'll want to believe him.

US: Investigative Report: U.S. ships unsafe products
by Russell CarolloSacramento Bee
September 9th, 2007
This report finds that goods manufactured in the US and sent to other countries do not meet our own safety standards and often do not receive media attention.

UK: Three 'face jail' over Ikea deals
BBC News Online
September 7th, 2007
A supplier and two employees of the furniture giant Ikea have admitted to using bribes in purchasing deals.

SOUTH KOREA: Hyundai Motor, affiliates hit with 63 billion won fine for unfair business
by Tony ChangYonhap News Service
September 6th, 2007
South Korea's corporate watchdog said Thursday that it fined Hyundai Motor Co., the country's No. 1 automaker, and its four affiliates more than 60 billion won (US$63.9 million) for 'unfairly' supporting other units.

US: Iraq convoy was sent out despite threat
by T. Christian MillerLA Times
September 3rd, 2007
Senior managers for defense contractor KBR overruled calls to halt supply operations in Iraq in the spring of 2004, ordering unarmored trucks into an active combat zone where six civilian drivers died in an ambush, according to newly available documents.

US: SEC Asks Firms to Detail Top Executives' Pay
by Kara Scannell and Joann S. LubliThe Wall Street Journal
August 31st, 2007
Stepping up its campaign to shed light on the mysteries of executive pay, the Securities and Exchange Commission has sent letters to nearly 300 companies across America critiquing disclosures in this year's proxy statements and demanding more information.

INDIA: Building a Modern Arsenal in India
by Heather Timmons and Somini SenguptaThe New York Times
August 31st, 2007
India is developing a military appetite to match its growing economic power. With a ballooning arms budget, India will soon become one of the largest military markets in the world, making it an important new target for American arms manufacturers.

US: Army to examine Iraq contracts
by Richard LardnerAssociated Press
August 29th, 2007
The Army will examine as many as 18,000 contracts awarded over the past four years to support U.S. forces in Iraq to determine how many are tainted by waste, fraud and abuse.

US: FTC: Milk Ads Not Misleading
by Sam HananelGuardian (UK)
August 28th, 2007
Federal regulators have turned down a request from Monsanto Co. to take action against dairy companies that advertise milk as free of synthetic hormones.

US: Role of Telecom Firms in Wiretaps Is Confirmed
by Eric LichtblauNew York Times
August 24th, 2007
The Bush administration has confirmed for the first time that American telecommunications companies played a crucial role in the National Security Agency’s domestic eavesdropping program after asserting for more than a year that any role played by them was a “state secret.”

CHINA: The Misery of China's Mines As Anger Flares Over Latest Disaster,Workers and Families Feel Powerless
by Edward CodyWashington Post
August 22nd, 2007
Anger at the wide spread pain and suffering of mining communities flares with each new disaster and the recent collapse of a mine on the Chaiwen River is no exception.

CHINA: Ravaged Rivers
by Jane SpencerWall Street Journal
August 22nd, 2007
China Pays Steep Price As Textile Exports Boom Suppliers to U.S. Stores Accused of Dumping Dyes To Slash Their Costs

CHINA: U.S. Group Accuses Chinese Toy Factories of Labor Abuses
by David Barboza New York Times
August 21st, 2007
A workers’ rights group in the United States released a report on Tuesday detailing what it called brutal conditions and illegal practices in Chinese toy factories, many of which supply some of the world’s biggest brand-name toy makers, including Walt Disney and Hasbro.

US: Plaintiffs Find Payday Elusive in Vioxx Cases
by Alex BerensonNew York Times
August 21st, 2007
Facing numerous lawsuits by people contending that they or their loved ones suffered heart attacks or strokes after taking the painkiller Vioxx, Merck & Company has managed to combat litigation, avoiding any form of liability.

EU: EU lobbyists face tougher regulation
by Andrew Bounds and Marine FormentiniFinancial Times
August 16th, 2007
Europe seems set for US-style controls on lobbying after the biggest public affairs companies in Brussels ruled out voluntary regulation because they would have to divulge their clients and fees.

US: Lead found in more baby bibs? Bibs sold in Toys R Us, Babies R Us questioned
by Anna Marie KukecDaily Herald
August 16th, 2007
A California consumer group said Wednesday it has filed a legal action against Toys R Us and Babies R Us for selling vinyl baby bibs said to contain high levels of lead.

INDIA: Indian Activists' Rising Clout
by Jackie RangeWall Street Journal
August 16th, 2007
India's Supreme Court is poised to decide whether a British company has the right to mine in a sacred tribal forest, a case that underlines the complexity of undertaking large-scale industrial projects here. The case's hearing by the court reflects the growing clout of activist groups in India.

UK: Raft of flaws found in popular carbon offsetting schemes
by Martin HickmanThe Independent (UK)
August 13th, 2007
A television documentary has uncovered flaws in a series of carbon offsetting schemes intended to make good the global warming gases emitted by flights and other polluting activities.

UK: British firm under scrutiny for export of Bosnian guns to Iraq
by Jamie Doward and Johnny McDevittThe Observer (UK)
August 13th, 2007
MPs and Amnesty International demand to know if a Nottingham-based company has breached the United Nations arms embargo

US: Hiking the Cost of Bribery
by Emma SchwartzUS News & World Report
August 13th, 2007
The Justice Department crackdown on corrupt practices overseas ensnares both U.S. and foreign companies

CHINA: China Enacting a High-Tech Plan to Track People
by Keith BradsherThe New York Times
August 12th, 2007
At least 20,000 police surveillance cameras are being installed along streets here in southern China and will soon be guided by sophisticated computer software from an American-financed company to recognize automatically the faces of police suspects and detect unusual activity.

IRAQ: U.S. Pays Millions In Cost Overruns For Security in Iraq
by Steve FainaruThe Washington Post
August 12th, 2007
U.S. military has paid $548 million over the past three years to two British security firms that protect the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on reconstruction projects, more than $200 million over the original budget, according to previously undisclosed data that show how the cost of private security in Iraq has mushroomed.

INDIA: Novartis Patents Case Far From Dead
by Praful BidwaiInter Press Service News Agency
August 9th, 2007
Cancer patients in India have reason to be relieved at a high court ruling this week which dismissed a petition by Swiss pharmaceuticals multinational corporation (MNC) Novartis challenging an Indian law which denies patents for minor or trivial improvements to known drugs.

INDIA: Indians Protest Wal-Mart’s Wholesale Entry
by Amelia GentlemanThe New York Times
August 9th, 2007
Wal-Mart, in a struggle to expand its global reach, is trying to enter India through the back door, but many consumers here have taken notice.

INDIA: Setback for Novartis in India Over Drug Patent
by Amelia GentlemanThe New York Times
August 7th, 2007
Indian companies will be free to continue making less expensive generic drugs, much of which flow to the developing world, after a court rejected a challenge to the patent law on Monday.

US: Lawmaker Calls for Registry of Drug Firms Paying Doctors
by Gardiner HarrisNew York Times
August 4th, 2007
An influential Republican senator says he will propose legislation requiring drug makers to disclose the payments they make to doctors for services like consulting, lectures and attendance at seminars.

US: Boeing unit subject of refiled CIA-flight suit
by Bloomberg NewsChicago Tribune
August 2nd, 2007
A Boeing Co. unit falsified flight plans to disguise the Central Intelligence Agency's transporting of terrorism suspects to secret prisons overseas, the American Civil Liberties Union claims in an updated lawsuit.

US: As Iraq Costs Soar, Contractors Earn Record Profits
by Eli CliftonInter Press Service News Agency
August 2nd, 2007
In a report to lawmakers earlier this week, the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office found that the war in Iraq could cost U.S. taxpayers over a trillion dollars when the long-term costs of caring for soldiers wounded in action, military and economic aid for the Iraqi government, and ongoing costs associated with the 190,000 troops stationed in Iraq are totaled up.

WORLD: We must count the true cost of cheap China
by Richard McGregorFinancial Times
August 2nd, 2007
In the wake of the multiple scandals over tainted Chinese food and drug exports in recent months, Chinese goods now have an indelible image of being not just cheap, but life-threatening as well. But the fact that wrongly labelled foods, liquor and pharmaceuticals have routinely sickened and even killed people en masse in China has been largely overlooked.

US: Mattel Recalls One Million Toys
by Louise Story New York Times
August 2nd, 2007
Mattel, the maker of Barbie dolls and Hot Wheels cars, is recalling nearly one million toys in the United States today because the products’ surfaces are covered in lead paint. According to Mattel, all the toys were made by a contract manufacturer in China.

COLOMBIA: Suing Multinationals Over Murder
by Ken StierTIME Magazine
August 1st, 2007
Organized labor often complains of its treatment at the hands of corporate America, but its accusations pale in comparison to those made recently by the widows of Colombian mine workers in an Alabama courtroom. During a two-week trial, a Birmingham jury weighed charges that the local Drummond Coal Company bore responsibility for the murders of three union leaders who represented workers at its Colombian mine - the world's largest open pit mine.

MEXICO: Thousands of Unpaid Teens Bag Groceries for Wal-Mart
by Joseph ContrerasNewsweek
August 1st, 2007
Wal-Mart prides itself on cutting costs at home and abroad, and its Mexican operations are no exception. Wal-Mart is Mexico's largest private-sector employer in the nation today, with nearly 150,000 local residents on its payroll. An additional 19,000 youngsters between the ages of 14 and 16 work after school in hundreds of Wal-Mart stores, mostly as grocery baggers, throughout Mexico-and none of them receives a red cent in wages or fringe benefits.

CHINA: Beijing Games Officials Penalize Firms
by Mei FongThe Wall Street Journal
August 1st, 2007
The Beijing Olympic Organizing Committee said it was taking corrective measures after a monthlong investigation found that four factories making Olympic merchandise were guilty of labor violations.

US: A Storied Union Takes On Starbucks
by Moira HerbstBusiness Week
August 1st, 2007
The Industrial Workers of the World is taking on the coffee giant and its much-praised workplace practices

BRITAIN: Brown unveils global anti-poverty drive
by Jean EagleshamFinancial Times
August 1st, 2007
Gordon Brown yesterday unveiled a "moral" alliance of leaders of governments and multinationals to tackle global poverty, telling the United Nations that globalisation could be a force for justice.

US: Blackwater-U. of I. tie
by E.A. Torriero and Jodi S. CohenThe Chicago Tribune
July 31st, 2007
The University of Illinois is investigating potential conflicts of interest involving the director of the school's prestigious police-training institute and Blackwater U.S.A., the military contractor.

IRAQ: For Abducted Guards, Iraq Wasn't Just About Money
by Steve FainaruWashington Post Foreign Service
July 30th, 2007
Surrounded by darkness, an AK-47 at his side, Jonathon Cote considered his future early last November from Southern Iraq. On Nov. 16, he and four colleagues from Crescent Security Group, a small private firm, were ambushed and taken hostage.

US: Can Ford Clean Up After Itself?
by Ron StodghillThe New York Times
July 29th, 2007
Follow-up studies on a cleanup effort at the site of a former Ford car factory have shown that there is still a great deal of toxins left in the soil.

IRAQ: Cutting Costs, Bending Rules, And a Trail of Broken Lives
by Steve FainaruThe Washington Post
July 29th, 2007
An ambush in Iraq last November left four Americans missing and a string of questions about the firm they worked for.

US: Navajos and Environmentalists Split on Power Plant
by Felicity BarringerThe New York Times
July 27th, 2007
A plan to build a new, large coal-fired power plant has proved divisive in the Navajo community in Nevada, with some arguing that it will bring the community millions, while others saying it is a lethal "energy monster" and harbinger of environmental destruction.

IRAQ: Foreign Workers Abused at Embassy, Panel Told
by William BraniginThe Washinton Post
July 27th, 2007
Two American civilian contractors who worked on a massive U.S. Embassy construction project in Baghdad told Congress yesterday that foreign laborers were deceptively recruited and trafficked to Iraq to toil at the site, where they experienced physical abuse and substandard working conditions.

IRAQ: Bechtel Meets Goals on Fewer Than Half of Its Iraq Rebuilding Projects, U.S. Study Finds
by James GlanzThe New York Times
July 26th, 2007
One of the largest American contractors working in Iraq, Bechtel National, met its original objectives on fewer than half of the projects it received as part of a $1.8 billion reconstruction contract, while most of the rest were canceled, reduced in scope or never completed as designed, federal investigators have found in a report released yesterday.

CHINA: Thomas & Friends Toy Maker Discusses Lead Paint Problem
by Louise Story New York Times
July 26th, 2007
Since the toy manufacturer RC2, discovered lead paint on a Thomas train in April, it has tried to strengthen its safety safeguards in China.

SOUTH AFRICA: S African miners vote to strike
BBC News
July 26th, 2007
South African workers for the world's biggest diamond producer, De Beers, have voted to go on strike over pay.

US: FDA Panel to Review Avandia
by Jennifer Corbett DoorenThe Wall Street Journal
July 26th, 2007
The Food and Drug Administration will ask a panel of outside medical experts Monday whether it thinks GlaxoSmithKline PLC's diabetes drug Avandia should remain on the U.S. market.

US: Savings and Issues in Candidates’ Use of Private Jets
by Michael Cooper and Leslie WayneThe New York Times
July 26th, 2007
Political fortunes and high costs have forced some presidential candidates to switch from using chartered private jets to those of corporations, including John McCain, who had previously sponsored a bill limiting use of corporate jets by candidates.

US: Blackwater supports inquiry into fatal shooting
by Bill SizemoreVirginian-Pilot
July 25th, 2007
After one of his personal bodyguards was shot to death by a Blackwater USA security contractor last Christmas Eve, Iraqi Vice President Adil Abdul-Mahdi assured the U.S. ambassador that he was trying to keep the incident out of the public eye.

COLOMBIA: Drummond Union: Govt Muffles Key Witness
by Frank BajakForbes.com
July 24th, 2007
The union activists suing U.S. coal company Drummond Co. Inc. in Alabama in the 2001 murders of three labor leaders say deliberate foot-dragging by Colombian authorities is preventing the jury from hearing their star witness. Concerned by the delay, 12 Democrats in the U.S. Congress wrote Colombia's vice president last week asking him to intercede.

US: Tax Break Used by Drug Makers Failed to Add Jobs
by Alex BerensonThe New York Times
July 24th, 2007
Two years ago, when companies received a big tax break to bring home their offshore profits, the president and Congress justified it as a one-time tax amnesty that would create American jobs. Drug makers were the biggest beneficiaries of the amnesty program, repatriating about $100 billion in foreign profits and paying only minimal taxes. But the companies did not create many jobs in return. Instead, since 2005 the American drug industry has laid off tens of thousands of workers in thi

BRITAIN: Companies 'looting' a continent
by Fran AbramsBBC News
July 24th, 2007
Gordon Brown has signalled he wants to see poor countries develop through trade rather than aid.

US: Sale of KBR Bolsters Profit at Halliburton
by Bloomberg NewsThe New York Times
July 24th, 2007
Halliburton, the oil field contractor, said second-quarter net income more than doubled on a gain from selling its government services and construction subsidiary, KBR.

EUROPE: A Genetically Modified Potato, Not for Eating, Is Stirring Some Opposition in Europe
by Elisabeth RosenthalThe New York Times
July 24th, 2007
Amflora potatoes, likely to become the first genetically modified crop in the last decade to be approved for growth in Europe, have become the unlikely lightning rod in the angry debate over such products on the Continent.

ITALY: Devil's Advocate
by Daniel FisherForbes
July 24th, 2007
Italian oil giant Eni has a long history of cutting deals with anyone, and of accusations of corruption and bribery. Now that its future hangs on Russia and its notorious reputation in the energy market, has Eni finally met its match?

US: 'America's private army' under fire for Illinois facility
by E.A. TorrieroChicago Tribune
July 23rd, 2007
Blackwater North, as the North Carolina-based firm calls its new site, is designed primarily as a tactical training ground for domestic law enforcement and contractors. Using civilians schooled in military warfare, the site offers training in weaponry, hostage dealings and terror reaction. Still, the sudden appearance of Blackwater is attracting criticism and questions from miles around. Anti-war activists and locals are wary about the new training site.

US: Drug Safety Critic Hurls Darts From the Inside
by Stephanie SaulNew York Times
July 23rd, 2007
An activist doctor emerges as the nation's unoffical ariter of drug safety by digging deep into companies' clinical data. At the same time, he presides over industry-financeed research worth millions of dollars.

EUROPE: Brussels accused of breaking lobbyist rules
by Andrew Bounds Financial Times
July 23rd, 2007
European commissioners, the continent’s regulators, have been criticised by their own watchdog for refusing to divulge details of meetings they and their staff have held with lobbyists.

US: Ex-Willbros official who sought Nigeria contract is indicted
by David Ivanovich Houston Chronicle
July 23rd, 2007
A federal grand jury in Houston has charged a former executive of a Willbros Group subsidiary with conspiring to bribe Nigerian officials as part of an alleged scheme to win a major natural gas pipeline contract.

CONGO: Edmonds group in spin after miner is run out
by Ben LauranceSunday Times
July 22nd, 2007
Billy Rautenbach, a former kingpin of the mining world in southern Africa becomes the newest "persona non grata" in the new DRC regime's attempt to rid its mining industry of corruption.

NIGERIA: Nigeria Adds Fraud Charge Against Pfizer in Civil Lawsuit
by Associated PressWall Street Journal
July 20th, 2007
Nigerian government lawyers added a tougher fraud charge in their $7 billion civil lawsuit against drug maker Pfizer Friday.

US: SEC Suspends Online Listing Of Companies Tied to Terrorism
by Deborah Solomon and Neil King Wall Street Journal
July 20th, 2007
Amid a barrage of criticism, the Securities and Exchange Commission is temporarily suspending an online list intended to spotlight companies doing business in countries tied to terrorism.

US: 3 Executives Spared Prison in OxyContin Case
by Barry MeierThe New York Times
July 20th, 2007
After hearing testimony from parents of young adults who died from overdoses involving the painkiller OxyContin, a federal judge Friday sentenced three top executives of the company that makes the narcotic to three years' probation and 400 hours each of community service in drug treatment programs.

NIGERIA: Tycoon exits Nigerian oil deals
BBC News
July 19th, 2007
Nigerian consortium Bluestar, led by tycoon Aliko Dangote, has pulled out of a deal to take stakes in oil refineries after protests by trade unionists.

US: Contractors fume over slow FEMA checks
by Becky BohrerAssociated Press
July 18th, 2007

UK: MPs want UK to pay living wage to overseas staff
by Karen McVeighThe Guardian (UK)
July 17th, 2007
MPs called for legislation yesterday to make British retailers pay their garment workers overseas a living wage.

US: Filling Gaps in Iraq, Then Finding a Void at Home
by John M. BroderNew York Times
July 17th, 2007
Taking the place of enlisted troops in every American army before this one, contract employees in Iraq cook meals, wash clothes, deliver fuel and guard bases. And they die and suffer alongside their brothers and sisters in uniform. About 1,000 contractors have been killed in Iraq since the war began; nearly 13,000 have been injured. The consequences of the war will be lasting for many of them and their families, ordeals that are largely invisible to most Americans.

US: Cited firm gets big security contract; Violations won't sour $323 million deal
by Allen Powell IIWest Bank Bureau
July 15th, 2007
A Hammond security company, Inner Parish Security Corp., which admitted to several "serious" state violations, including hiring an underage officer, has been awarded a large federal contract to provide private security officers at FEMA trailer parks in metro New Orleans.

US: Katrina Ice Being Melted After 2 Years
Associated Press
July 14th, 2007
After nearly two years, thousands of truck miles and $12.5 million in storage costs, the federal government is getting rid of thousands of pounds of ice it had sent south to help Katrina victims, then north when it determined much of the ice wasn't needed.

US: Former KBR employee pleads guilty in Kuwaiti kickback case
by Brett ClantonHouston Chronicle
July 13th, 2007
A former KBR employee pleads guilty to Kuwaiti kickback charges.

US: Conrad Black Found Guilty in Fraud Trial
by Richard SilkosThe New York Times
July 13th, 2007
Conrad M. Black, the gregarious press tycoon also known as Lord Black of Crossharbour, was found guilty today by a Chicago jury of three counts of mail fraud and one count of obstruction of justice. He could face up to 35 years in prison.

WORLD: A Way for Resource-Rich Countries to Audit Their Way Out of Corruption
by Tyler CowenThe New York Times
July 12th, 2007
An Oxford economist has a new and potentially powerful idea: setting up an voluntary international charter to guide transparency efforts in resource-rich developing countries, in order to stave of corruption.

CHINA: Lead Toxins Take a Global Round Trip
by Gordon FaircloughThe Wall Street Journal
July 12th, 2007
High levels of toxic lead turning up in cheap jewelry from China are prompting recalls in the U.S. But some of the lead used by these Chinese manufacturers comes from an unconventional source: computers and other electronic goods discarded in Western countries and dumped in China.

UGANDA: African forest under threat from sugar cane plantation
by Daniel HowdenThe Independent (UK)
July 10th, 2007
Conservationists in Uganda are fighting a last-ditch battle to stop the destruction of a forest reserve by a sugar corporation friendly with the government.

CHILE: Gold rush threatens glacier
by Lucia Newman Al Jazeera
July 8th, 2007
A new gold rush is under way as mining companies seek to supply the ever-increasing demand for the precious metal from emerging economies such as India, and with reserves dwindling all over the world they are going to extraordinary lengths to extract it.

UN: Global Compact with Business 'Lacks Teeth' - NGOs
by Gustavo CapdevilaInter Press News Service (IPS)
July 6th, 2007
The U.N.'s Global Compact with international big business "at the moment is so voluntary that it really is a happy-go-lucky club," says Ramesh Singh, chief executive of ActionAid, a non-governmental organisation. The controversy has come to a boiling point because of the Global Compact Leaders' Summit being held in Geneva on Thursday and Friday, at which over 1,000 representatives of multinational companies are taking part, in addition to well-known civil society figures like Irene Khan, the secretary general of AI; Mary Robinson, president of the Ethical Globalisation Initiative; Guy Ryder, general secretary of the International Trade Union Confederation; and Jeremy Hobbs, executive director of Oxfam International.

NETHERLANDS: Shell ordered to withdraw 'misleading' Dutch ad that made environmental claims
by James KanterThe International Herald Tribune
July 5th, 2007
Royal Dutch Shell has been ordered to withdraw an advertisement in the Netherlands that sought to portray the oil giant as environmentally friendly, and British authorities said Thursday they had opened a formal investigation in the case.

US: Contractors Back From Iraq Suffer Trauma From Battle
by James RisenThe New York Times
July 5th, 2007
Contractors who have worked in Iraq are returning home with the same kinds of combat-related mental health problems that afflict United States military personnel, according to contractors, industry officials and mental health experts.

IRAQ: Private contractors outnumber U.S. troops in Iraq
by T. Christian MillerThe Los Angeles Times
July 4th, 2007
New U.S. data show how heavily the Bush administration has relied on corporations to carry out the occupation of the war-torn nation.

INDONESIA: Palm Oil Producer Unethical, Groups Say
by Toby SterlingThe Associated Press
July 3rd, 2007
A Singapore-based company was involved in slashing and burning Indonesian forests to make way for palm oil plantations that feed the growing market for biofuels, environmental and activist groups claimed Tuesday. The company emphatically denied the allegations.

SAO TOME: No Oil Yet, but African Isle Finds Slippery Dealings
by Barry Meier and Jad MouawadThe New York Times
July 2nd, 2007
The experience of São Tomé, a poor country that supports itself by selling cocoa and commemorative stamps featuring celebrities like Elvis Presley and Brigitte Bardot, shows how just the hint of oil can set off a scramble for riches.

IRAQ: A Private Realm Of Intelligence-Gathering; Firm Extends U.S. Government's Reach
by Steve Fainaru and Alec KleinWashington Post Foreign Service
July 1st, 2007
On the first floor of a tan building inside Baghdad's Green Zone, the full scope of Iraq's daily carnage is condensed into a 30-minute PowerPoint presentation. The intelligence was compiled not by the U.S. military, but by a British security firm, Aegis Defence Services Ltd. The Reconstruction Operations Center is the most visible example of how intelligence collection is now among the responsibilities handled by a network of private security companies that work in the shadows of the U.S. military.

US: Buying Into the Green Movement
by Alex WilliamsThe New York Times
July 1st, 2007
Consumers have embraced living green, and for the most part the mainstream green movement has embraced green consumerism. But even at this moment of high visibility and impact for environmental activists, a splinter wing of the movement has begun to critique what it sometimes calls “light greens.”

UK: Tesco investors attack executive bonus plan
by Karen AttwoodThe Independent
June 30th, 2007
Anger is mounting over a new bonus scheme at Tesco that will reward chief executive Sir Terry Leahy with a £11.5m windfall if the supermarket group's US venture Fresh & Easy succeeds.

US: States Target Big-Box Stores; Maine Is First to Require That Wal-Mart, Rivals Undergo Impact Studies
by Kris HudsonThe Wall Street Journal
June 29th, 2007
Maine Gov. John Baldacci last week signed into law a measure requiring developers of retail stores exceeding 75,000 square feet to conduct studies gauging the project's impact on municipal services, the environment and local businesses. Similar measures have been passed in other states.

IRAQ: Blackwater Blues for Dead Contractors' Families
by Bill BerkowitzInter Press Service News Agency
June 29th, 2007
The families of four Blackwater employees who were killed in Iraq have filed a lawsuit that accuses the world's largest private security firm of negligence; Blackwater is suing back.

CHINA: The Growing Dangers of China Trade
by Jyoti ThottamTIME Magazine
June 28th, 2007
Growing concerns over the safety of everyday goods manufactured in China and imported to the US have thrown into relief the problematic (and dangerous) differences in safety and regulatory standards between the two countries.

WORLD: US probes Saudi-linked UK arms firm
by David Robertson and Tom BaldwinThe Times (London)
June 28th, 2007
The British and US governments are on a diplomatic collision course after the US Department of Justice launched a formal investigation into allegations of corruption at defence company BAE Systems. The US investigation will scrutinise BAE's dealings with Saudi Arabia to expose an account allegedly held by the Bank of England that is used to facilitate Saudi payments for arms.

US: Bandar Bribery Case Crosses the Atlantic
by Emad Mekay Inter Press Service News Agency
June 27th, 2007
The U.S. Justice Department is investigating allegations of bribery by the British defence contractor BAE Systems to Prince Bandar Bin Sultan, a high-ranking member of the Saudi royal family with wide contacts and relations here.

NIGERIA: Pfizer wins early Nigeria battle
BBC News
June 26th, 2007
A Nigerian court has refused to allow more cases to be added to a lawsuit against a pharmaceutical giant accused of improper drugs trials on children.

US: At Home Depot, How Green Is That Chainsaw?
by Cliffard KrausNew York Times
June 25th, 2007
As companies rush to carry "environmentally friendly" products, Home Depot encourages suppliers to pitch to have their products included in its new Eco Options marketing campaign. Critics argue that the green label is overused and overmarketed.

IRAQ: Audit of KBR Iraq Contract Faults Records For Fuel, Food; U.S. Says It Will Increase Monitoring in Baghdad
by Dana HedgpethThe Washington Post
June 24th, 2007
KBR, the government contracting firm formerly under Halliburton, did not keep accurate records of gasoline distribution, put its employees in living spaces that may be larger than warranted and served meals that appeared to cost $4.5 million more than necessary under a contract to perform work in Iraq, according to an audit by a government oversight agency.

US: On the Rio Grande, Anger Swells Over Plans for Fence; Residents, Ecologists United in Opposition
by Sylvia MorenoThe Washington Post
June 22nd, 2007
Environmentalistsa and land-owners livng along the US-Mexico border express anger at the US government's plan to build 700 miles of fence along the US-Mexico border, claiming that the fence will threaten both local farming and a valuable nature preserve and wildlife corridor.

SOUTH AFRICA: Globalization Brings South Africa Gains -- and Pains
by David WesselThe Wall Street Journal
June 21st, 2007
Globalization has been both a boon and a bane for South Africa; it has helped along the country's integration into the global economy and strengthened its regional political position, but it has also contributed to the widening gap between a wealthy minority and the poor majority, something that is creating a whole new generation of disenfranchised citizens.

US: Starbucks in Ethiopia coffee vow
BBC News Online
June 21st, 2007
Starbucks has agreed a wide-ranging accord with Ethiopia to support and promote its coffee, ending a long-running dispute over the issue.

INDONESIA: Mud Volcano Sullies Top Investment Firms
by Emad MekayInter Press News Service (IPS)
June 21st, 2007
Environmental campaigners are urging several heavyweight investment firms, including Credit Suisse, Barclays, Fortis Group and Merrill Lynch, to shoulder some responsibility for a catastrophic mud volcano on the Indonesian island of Java that resulted from a gas project the firms helped fund.

US: Fired worker wins Wal-Mart case
BBC News
June 20th, 2007
A female pharmacist dismissed by Wal-Mart has been awarded nearly $2m (£1m) in damages after a jury concluded she was the victim of discrimination.

US: Ex-Enron Executive Sentenced to Prison
by Bloomberg NewsThe New York Times
June 19th, 2007
The former chief of the Internet unit at Enron has been sentenced to 27 months in prison for helping mislead investors in the fraud that sent Enron, the world's largest energy trader, into bankruptcy.

US: Justices Back Underwriters On New Issues
by Linda GreenhouseThe New York Times
June 19th, 2007
The securities industry dodged a bullet on Monday when the Supreme Court threw out a private antitrust suit that accused 10 leading investment banks of conspiring to fix prices for the initial public offerings of hundreds of technology companies during the 1990s.

US: Politics Forcing Detroit to Back New Fuel Rules
by Micheline MaynardThe New York Times
June 19th, 2007
This week, with a vote possible in the Senate on an energy plan, car companies retreated from their longstanding argument that any legislation to increase fuel economy standards would rob them of profits, force them to lay off workers and deprive consumers of the vehicles they wanted to buy. They are now lobbying for a modest increase in mileage standards, a position already adopted by Toyota, in the hopes of silencing calls for even tougher targets.

MALAYSIA: Death of a Migrant Worker
by Anil NettoInter Press Service News Agency
June 19th, 2007
False promises of good pay and healthy working conditions fed to Indian migrant workers in Malaysia have led to destitution, physical abuse, and now, it seems, death.

US: Offshoring and Cheap Imports May Hurt Workers, OECD Says
by Marcus WalkerThe Wall Street Journal
June 19th, 2007
Offshoring and inexpensive imports may be hurting low-skilled workers in the U.S. and Europe to the extent that free trade and open markets could become increasingly difficult for politicians to sell to their constituents, according to one of the world's leading economics institutes.

CHINA: Child Labour Scandal Exposes Gross Corruption
by Antoaneta BezlovaInter Press Service News Agency
June 18th, 2007
An unfolding national scandal on the large-scale abuse of child labourers in the brick kiln industry raises questions on the adequacy of planned labour laws that are supposed to take on sweatshops and protect workers' rights.

AFRICA: What Does Africa Need Most: Technology or Aid?
by Jason PontinThe New York Times
June 17th, 2007
TED Global 2007 is one small skirmish in a larger ideological conflict between those who believe that Africa needs more and better international aid, and those who think entrepreneurialism and technology will lift the continent out of poverty and thus reduce its miseries.

US: What Ted Stevens, Bolivian cocaine and Halliburton have in common; Or, how the Alaskan Inupiat Eskimos got a no-bid contract in South America from the U.S. government.
by Michael SchererSalon.com
June 17th, 2007
An Alaskan Inupiat Eskimo firm has been awarded a multi-million dollar no-bid contract to feed Bolivian soldiers and police in that country's continuing drug war, raising questions concerning the firms on-going relationship with former Halliburton subsidiary KBR and the US Senate's Alaskan Native Corporation privilege.

IRAQ: Contractors Face Growing Parallel War; As Security Work Increases, So Do Casualties
by Steve FainaruWashington Post Foreign Service
June 16th, 2007
Private security companies, funded by billions of dollars in U.S. military and State Department contracts, are fighting insurgents on a widening scale in Iraq, enduring daily attacks, returning fire and taking hundreds of casualties that have been underreported and sometimes concealed, according to U.S. and Iraqi officials and company representatives.

COLUMBIA: Studies Find DNA Damage from Anti-Coca Herbicide
by Stephen LeahyInter Press Service News Agency
June 16th, 2007
U.S.-funded aerial spraying of coca plantations in Colombia near the Ecuador border has severely damaged the DNA of local residents, a new study has found.

BURMA: No End to Forced Labour
by Gustavo Capdevila Inter Press Service News Agency
June 15th, 2007
The International Labour Organisation (ILO) expressed profound concern about the persistence of forced labour in Burma, while it is closely monitoring the implementation of a mechanism for victims to file complaints, which was recently agreed with the Southeast Asian country's governing junta.

IRAQ: Caught in Trafficking
by David PhinneyInter Press Service News Agency
June 15th, 2007
A Filipino air conditioner repairman's life was turned upside down when promises of good pay and work in Kuwait were replaced with the harsh realities of corrupt recruiters, horrible living conditions and forced work in Iraq.

UK: Mission impossible for legal top gun?
by David ProsserThe Independent
June 12th, 2007
BAE is set to appoint Lord Woolf as head of a business ethics committee designed to restore the reputation of the battered defence giant.

DR CONGO: DR Congo reviews 60 mining deals
BBC News
June 12th, 2007
The BBC's John James in Kinshasa says that since DR Congo's independence in 1960 its vast mineral wealth has been a key factor in the country's civil wars and instability.

US: CIA Plans Cutbacks, Limits on Contractor Staffing
by Walter Pincus and Stephen BarrWashington Post
June 11th, 2007
Acting under pressure from Congress, the CIA has decided to trim its contractor staffing by 10 percent. It is the agency's first effort since the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks to curb what critics have decried as the growing privatization of U.S. intelligence work, a circumstance that has sharply boosted some personnel costs.

CHINA: Child labour caution for China Olympics
by Andrew TaylorFinancial Times
June 10th, 2007
Licensed goods being made for next year’s Beijing Olympic Games are being manufactured by child labour and “sweatshops” in China, the Playfair Alliance says in a report published on Monday.

WORLD: Food Firms Accused of Pushing Toddler Milk
by Bellinda KontominasSydney Morning Herald
June 9th, 2007
Food and drug companies are using aggressive marketing tactics similar to those used in the tobacco industry to circumvent advertising bans on infant formulas and sell milk drinks to parents.

IVORY COAST: Cocoa exports ‘fund’ Ivory Coast conflict
by  William Wallis and Dino MahtaniFinancial Times
June 7th, 2007
After diamonds and timber, Global Witness, the London-based pressure group, has turned its sights on chocolate in a report that claims cocoa exports from Ivory Coast, the world’s largest producer, have contributed to funding and prolonging the conflict there.

LONDON:Saudi Prince Secretly Made $2B in 1985 Arms Deal
by Kevin SullivanWashington Post Foreign Service
June 7th, 2007
Prince Bandar bin Sultan, a member of Saudi Arabia's royal family and the kingdom's former ambassador to the United States, pocketed about $2 billion in secret payments as part of a $80 billion arms deal between Britain and Saudi Arabia first signed in 1985, British media reported Thursday.

CAMBODIA:Denuded by Corruption, Plunder, Impunity
by Marwaan Macan-Markar Inter Press Service News Agency
June 6th, 2007
The Cambodian government turns its ire on non-governmental organisations that are critical of Cambodia's environmental policies and the copious relationships between logging companies and Cambodia's political elite and military.

BRUSSELS:Europe Moves to Make Big Polluters Pay for Emissions
by Stephen CastleThe New York Times
June 4th, 2007
Europe moves towards making significant changes to its emissions-trading system that could force large polluters to pay for most, if not all, permits to produce climate-changing gases.

GERMANY:German Police and Protesters Battle Near Site of G-8 Meeting
by Reutershttp://www.nytimes.com/2007/06/03/world/europe/03germany.html?_r=1&n=Top%2fReference%2fTimes%20Topics%2fOrganizations%2fG%2fGroup%20of%20Eight&oref=slogin
June 3rd, 2007
German police clashed with hundreds of protesters in the port of Rostock on Saturday following a much larger peaceful demonstration against the Group of 8 summit meeting next week in a nearby Baltic resort.

CHILE: Chile Must Pay US$5.4 Million to Aricans Living Amid Toxic Waste
by Mike HagerThe Santiago Times
June 1st, 2007
In a landmark case, Chile’s Supreme Court ruled this week that the state must compensate 356 residents of two slums in the northern mining city of Arica for health problems brought on by years of exposure to open deposits of toxic waste. Promel, the Swedish company responsible for the importation of the toxic materials, cannot compensate the plaintiffs because the company no longer exists.

GERMANY: AUB chief says Siemens funded union
by Richard Milnein FrankfurtThe Financial Times Limited 2007
May 31st, 2007
Siemens' senior management sanctioned the funding of an alternative labour organisation to the German industrial group's main trade union, according to claims made by the former head of the rival union.

US: Bristol-Myers to Pay Fine
Agence France Presse
May 31st, 2007
Bristol-Myers Squibb has agreed to plead guilty and pay a $1 million criminal fine for lying to the government about a patent deal on its blood-thinning drug Plavix, officials said Wednesday. The Justice Department said in a statement that the company’s actions had threatened to reduce competition for the drug, one of the best-selling prescription medications worldwide.

NIGERIA: Pfizer Faces Criminal Charges in Nigeria
by Joe StephensWashington Post
May 30th, 2007
Officials in Nigeria have brought criminal charges against pharmaceutical giant Pfizer for the company's alleged role in the deaths of children who received an unapproved drug during a meningitis epidemic.

JAPAN: NEC workers fake orders worth Y2.2bn
by Mariko Sanchanta Financial Times
May 29th, 2007
NEC, the Japanese electronics company, Tuesday said that 10 rogue employees placed fake orders worth Y2.2bn ($200m) and accepted kickbacks worth Y500m, which they spent on personal wining and dining.

US: Whistleblower alleges Lockheed official misled Congress on Deepwater
by Alice LipowiczWashington Technology
May 29th, 2007
A senior official at Lockheed Martin Corp. in charge of the Deepwater contract for the Coast Guard refused a meeting with one of his own division employees in 2004 to discuss shortcomings in the program’s converted patrol boats, charged Deepwater whistleblower Michael DeKort in a just-released letter to two members of Congress.

US: Investigators eye remodeling at Alaska home of Sen. Ted Stevens
Associated Press
May 29th, 2007
Federal agents are looking into Sen. Ted Stevens' role in the ongoing investigation into the remodeling of his Alaska home, according to two law enforcement officials familiar with the probe.

CHINA: BNP executive ‘bribed official’
by Richard McGregor in Beijing and Sundeep Tucker in Hong KongFinancial Times
May 29th, 2007
An executive in the Shanghai office of BNP Paribas bribed a senior government official in the capital in order to win business underwriting Chinese sovereign bonds, according to the Beijing city prosecutor’s office.

IRAQ: U.S. Security Contractors Open Fire in Baghdad
by Steve Fainaru and Saad al-IzziThe Washington Post
May 27th, 2007
Employees of Blackwater USA, a private security firm under contract to the State Department, opened fire on the streets of Baghdad twice in two days last week, and one of the incidents provoked a standoff between the security contractors and Iraqi forces, U.S. and Iraqi officials said.

INDONESIA: Blood boils as mud volcano swallows homes
Sydney Morning Herald
May 26th, 2007
One year ago this Tuesday, a gas-exploration well part-owned by the Australian mining giant Santos blew, sending a geyser of mud and toxic gas into the air. Nearby villages and factories were flooded, then a big highway and railway were covered, and later East Java's main gas pipeline ruptured.

IRAQ: Death Toll for Contractors Reaches New High in Iraq
by John M. Broder and James RisenNew York Times
May 19th, 2007
Casualties among private contractors in Iraq have soared to record levels this year, setting a pace that seems certain to turn 2007 into the bloodiest year yet for the civilians who work alongside the American military in the war zone, according to new government numbers.

AUSTRALIA: Miner's poll cash for MPs
by Amanda O'BrienThe Australian
May 19th, 2007
MINING company Precious Metals Australia donated thousands of dollars to the election campaigns of two West Australian politicians who helped write a doctored report that commercially benefited the company.

US: Governor vetoes liquefied gas proposal
by Marc LifsherLos Angeles Times
May 19th, 2007
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Friday vetoed a proposal to build a terminal for importing liquefied natural gas 20 miles off the coast of Malibu, but he kept the door open for future LNG projects if they are environmentally sensitive.

SUDAN: China accused of supporting Sudan rights abuse
Agence France Presse
May 18th, 2007
A leading opponent of a Chinese-financed dam in Sudan accused Beijing on Friday of fueling widespread human rights abuses, as Khartoum moved to relocate 70,000 villagers to make way for the project.

THAILAND: Holding Big Pharma's feet to the fire
by Marwaan Macan-MarkarInter Press Service
May 17th, 2007
For nearly a week, the advertising pages of Thai- and English-language dailies have been the stage for debates on Thailand's decision to break patents on anti-AIDS drugs in the interest of public health. A lobby championing the cause of the powerful pharmaceutical companies ran full-page spreads in the morning newspapers with an eye-catching warning in large, bold text, which said: "The Wrong Prescription for Thailand".

US: Halliburton on short list for Corporate Hall of Shame
MSN News
May 15th, 2007
Halliburton Co. is one of eight companies voters can choose to be inducted to Corporate Accountability International's Corporate Hall of Shame.

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