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Bordering Injustice
by Traci Griggs and Martha ValdsLa Jornada
December 9th, 1998
Non-profit environmental justice groups such as the San Diego-based Environmental Health Coalition (EHC), are trying to remove the rose colored glasses and expose the harsh reality of the U.S/Mexico border in an attempt to protect public and environmental health. EHC's battle against an abandoned maquiladora turned toxic dump, serves as a microcosm of what's wrong with border health and how NAFTA, for the most part, has exacerbated the problem.

A Movement Blossoms: Cross-Border Activism Picks Up Speed
by Kent PatersonBorderlines
October 20th, 1998
In October 1998, after years of protest by an unprecedented bi-national coalition, the proposed Sierra Blanca nuclear waste dump was defeated. The proposed site for the commercial nuclear waste dump was just 16 miles from the Texas-Mexico border.

US: Ford and GM Scrutinized for Alleged Nazi Collaboration
by Michael DobbsWashington Post
September 30th, 1998
Three years after Swiss banks became the target of a worldwide furor over their business dealings with Nazi Germany, major American car companies find themselves embroiled in a similar debate.

Death, Neglect and the Bottom Line
by William Allen and Kim BellSt. Louis Post-Dispatch
September 27th, 1998
St. Louis-based Correctional Medical Services leads the expanding field of private companies providing medical care behind bars. The industry tries to keep a low profile, but a five-month investigation by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch found a disturbing pattern of deaths and untreated illnesses behind bars.

MEXICO: NGO Battles Telmex Planning Move into US Market
by Kent PatersonBorderlines
September 1st, 1998
U.S. consumers may soon have yet another long-distance phone company competing for their monthly accounts. After years of wrangling, Telefonos de Mexico (Telmex) was recently granted approval by the Federal Communications Commission to test-market telephone services aimed at Spanish-speakers in Tucson, AZ.

The Mexican Version of Pulpwood Plantations
by Alejandro VillamarWorld Rainforest Movement Bulletin
August 1st, 1998
In response to pressure from the maquiladora industry, the Mexican government is now paving the way for the large-scale pulpwood plantations in order to provide industry with raw material to produce cheap pulp and paper.

US: No Remorse from Raytheon Protesters
by Sarah GodcherEagle-Tribune
April 23rd, 1998
Seven anti-war protesters arrested at Raytheon last month held a vigil outside the Lawrence courthouse before a pre-trial hearing yesterday. Shown here are (from left) former North Andover resident Sean Donahue of Durham, N.H., and Marcia Gagliardi and Harriet Nestel, both of Athol, talking to Shannon O'Connor of Maine. But all seven self-described "Raytheon Peacemakers" rejected the offer in favor of a jury trial - all the while admitting they did cross a boundary line established by police.

India: New Computer Operating System Takes Country by Storm
by B. HarshIndia Abroad News Service
February 9th, 1998
MUMBAI -- Linux, a computer operating system that has thrown up the biggest ever challenge to Microsoft's monopoly and which got a boost with the Hollywood blockbuster ''Titanic'', is taking the Indian software industry by storm.

China: Reviewing Ban of the Arms sales on China
by Steven Lee Myers New York Times
January 18th, 1998
On the eve of his trip to Asia this week, Secretary of Defense William S. Cohen pressed the Clinton Administration to let an American arms maker sell spare parts to China, despite a ban on sales of military equipment imposed after the Tiananmen Square massacre in 1989, Administration officials say.

US: The Northrop Grumman B-2 Boondoggle
by Ken SilversteinMultinational Monitor
September 1st, 1997
As the monitor goes to press, the U.S. Congress appears headed for a showdown vote on the fate of Northrop-Grumman's B-2 bomber, the single most expensive piece of military equipment ever designed, with a per unit price of about $2 billion. Congress has already allocated $44 billion for the project, a figure that exceeds the annual defense budget for all but four nations in the world (England, France, Japan and Germany). Now, hawks in the House led by Representative Norm Dicks of Washington state -- a major recipient of campaign cash from Boeing, a B-2 subcontractor -- are trying to win another $9 billion for the bomber. The Senate has voted to cap production at the current level of 20. A conference committee will soon resolve the issue.

Nike Must Stop Exploiting My Students
by Yvonne H.D. NobleLos Angeles Times
July 26th, 1997
Last fall, a reporter from The Times asked me about the relationship between Crenshaw High School boys' basketball program and Nike in terms of what the corporations donates to the basketball players. To my knowledge as the principal, I told him, the company gave each member of the boys' team a pair of tennis shoes, just as Karl Kani, a smaller African American ownedbusiness, gave shoes to members of the girls' team.

Double Standards: Notes for a Border Screenplay
by Debbie NathanTexas Observer
June 6th, 1997
The case had been settled only minutes ago, and now jurors for Mendoza v. Contico were seated in a room outfitted with movie theater chairs and plugs for devices like VCRs. They were in the ''Ceremonial Court'' in El Paso, where victorious lawyers often hold post-trial press conferences.

Canada: Business-Education Partnerships a Troubling Trend
by Bernie Froese-Germain and Marita MollEducation Monitor
June 1st, 1997
Berne Froese-Germain and Martia Moll, two researchers with the Canadian Teachers Federation, outline the scope of the problem.

USA: Cigarette Companies Target Ethnic Groups to Expand Markets, Activists Complain
by Annie NakaoSan Francisco Examiner
May 18th, 1997
Asian community leaders -- mindful of ''World No Tobacco Day'' on May 31 -- say their battle to reduce high smoking rates among Asian Americans is making inroads but can't succeed as long as cigarette advertisers keep targeting their neighborhoods.

Saudi Arabia: Royal Family Gets Quiet Help From U.S. Firm With Connections
by Charles J HanleyAssociated Press
March 22nd, 1997
Vinnell first came to Saudi Arabia 22 years ago on a "one-time" training mission. Today, under a Pentagon-supervised contract, its military specialists are permanent on-scene consultants throughout the National Guard. Three hundred Vinnell experts, almost all U.S. military veterans, many recently discharged, instruct Saudi guardsmen in the latest weaponry, supervise supply operations, teach brigade-level tactics, help operate a hospital and are updating the Guard's data processing, among other functions.

US: Old hands hold hands with Beijing on trade policy
by George ArchibaldThe Washington Times
March 3rd, 1997
Big bucks and big names are proving to be corporate America's weapons of choice in a heightened lobbying push to head off any U.S. retaliation for China's reported involvement in the unfolding political fund-raising scandal.

USA: RSI Suit May Finally Catch Up with Apple
by Reynolds HoldingSan Francisco Chronicle
January 19th, 1997
For the first time ever, a keyboard maker has lost a lawsuit involving repetitive stress injury. And, with dozens of suits pending against it, this could be bad news for Apple.

USA: Intel Computer Chip Plant Tests New Environmental Rules
by Pratap ChatterjeeInter Press Service
October 14th, 1996
SAN FRANCISCO -- The 1.3-billion-dollar expansion of a computer chip plant near Phoenix, Arizona, heralds a new era in environmental regulation, according to company and U.S. government officials.

US: Disney Shows Two Worlds
by Mark FritzAssociated Press
September 30th, 1996
Because Disney World controls so much of its corporate and municipal universe, it can't help but act in a heavy-handed manner in order to ferociously protect its self-interest.

US: Lockheed Talks, the Pentagon Listens
by William HartungWashington Post
June 26th, 1996
His name is not a household word, but Norman Augustine is one of those rare Washington power brokers for whom a Cabinet-level position would be a demotion. Augustine is the chief executive officer of Lockheed Martin Corp., the world's largest defense conglomerate, and a key player in the network of quasi-official military-industrial interest groups. He will probably have as much to say about how much money the United States spends on weapons through the end of this decade as any secretary of defense.

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