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Canada: Silencing Quebec
by Naomi KleinGlobe and Mail
March 20th, 2001
It turns out that the most effective form of crowd control isn't pepper spray, water cannons, tear gas, or any of the other weapons being readied by Quebec police in anticipation of the arrival of 34 heads of state. The most cutting-edge form of crowd control is controlling the crowds before they converge: this is state-of-the-art protest deterrence -- the silencing you do yourself.

Argentina: Political Fallout From Austerity Plan
by Oscar MartinezAgence France Presse
March 19th, 2001
The Argentine government found itself Monday struggling to contain political fallout from the announcement three days earlier of major public spending cuts, as the first protesters took to the streets.

USA: Corporate Power in Overdrive
by Robert B. ReichNew York Times
March 18th, 2001
There's no longer any countervailing power in Washington. Business is in complete control of the machinery of government. The House, the Senate and the White House are all run by business-friendly Republicans who are deeply indebted to American business for their electoral victories.

UK: How the Market Made Us Stupid
by Will HuttonThe Observer (London)
March 18th, 2001
Four trillion dollars is a lot of money. It is the entire annual output of Britain and France put together. It is also the amount American investors in high-tech shares have lost over the past 12 months -- and that's before their losses in the rest of the stock market.

CHINA: Government Puts Brakes on WTO
by Robert MarquandChristian Science Monitor
March 16th, 2001
After a strong '90s-era push by China's top echelon of reformers to insert this huge but developing country into the fast lane of the world's economy, including World Trade Organization membership this year, a quiet but significant shift toward caution is under way, with a wing of Communist Party brass reportedly worried about the potential social pressures that wrenching and wholesale structural changes to China's economy may bring.

Sudan: Oil Firms Accused of Fueling Mass Displacement and Killing
by Victoria Brittain and Terry MacalisterThe Guardian (London)
March 15th, 2001
Oil companies operating in Sudan are complicit in the systematic depopulating of large areas of the country and atrocities against civilians, tens of thousands of whom have been killed and displaced from the areas around the oil fields, according to a report to be published today.

FRANCE: Activist Jose Bov Gets Suspended Sentence
Agence France Presse
March 15th, 2001
French anti-globalization activist Jose Bove on Thursday was sentenced to a 10-month suspended prison term for the destruction in 1999 of genetically altered rice plants.

USA: Federal Worker Fired For Posting Refuge Map
by Lisa GetterLos Angeles Times
March 15th, 2001
Last week, Ian Thomas posted a map on a U.S. government Web site of the caribou calving areas in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, an area the Bush administration wants to open up for oil exploration. This week, Thomas is looking for a new job.

USA: Bush's Reversal on Greenhouse Gas Cuts
by Cat LazaroffEnvironment News Service
March 14th, 2001
President George W. Bush did an abrupt about face Tuesday, reversing a previous pledge to legislate limits on carbon dioxide emissions from U.S. power plants. Bush said such a rule would prove too costly, launching another in a slew of recent federal and state government attempts to roll back environmental protections in favor of controlling energy prices.

Brazil: Dam Protestors Occupy Energy Ministry
Environment News Service
March 14th, 2001
The Brazilian Ministry of Mines and Energy was occupied this morning by 1,500 people who came from all across the country to protest the negative effects of large dams.

USA: 'Union-Free' Wal-Mart
by Harry KelberLaborTalk
March 12th, 2001
There are about 3,000 Wal-Mart stores that employ 950,000 people and not one has been unionized. The best the 1.4 million-member United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) has been able to achieve is to organize a delicatessen unit of 11 Wal-Mart workers last year in a store in Jacksonville. Tex., where 10 of them no longer work.

USA: Right Wing IMF Critic Named to Treasury Post
by Paul Blustein--Health GAP CoalitionWashington Post
March 6th, 2001
Kenneth W. Dam, a law professor and former top State Department official, will be nominated to become deputy secretary of the Treasury, the White House announced yesterday.

SOUTH AFRICA: Financial Institutions Eye Public Services
by Gumisai MutumeInter Press Service
March 6th, 2001
Anti-privatisation protestors are expected to descend on the streets of Johannesburg this month as they demand a reversal of the sale of their municipal water supply to French multinational Suez Lyonnaise des Eaux.

Italy: G-8 Ministers Renew Commitment To Kyoto Protocol
UN Wire
March 5th, 2001
Environment ministers from the world's seven most industrialized countries plus Russia yesterday renewed their commitment to combat global warming and promised to reach consensus on reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Group of Eight country representatives met for three days starting Friday in Trieste, Italy.

SRI Lanka: Overtime Law Hurts Sweatshop Workers
by Renuka SenanayakeInter Press Service
March 2nd, 2001
Rights activists are unhappy with the Labour Ministry's plan to amend labour laws to introduce 80 hours of overtime every month for factory workers, including those in export processing zones (EPZ).

US: Nike Sued for Greenwash
March 2nd, 2001
Marc Kasky, a self-described environmentalist, viewed the Ernst and Young audit as an opportunity. Enlisting the support of San Francisco attorney Alan Caplan, he filed a suit against Nike in April of 1998. The suit claims that Nike's assertions about the labor conditions in its Asia factories amounted to false advertising.

MEXICO: Rocks, Tear Gas at Cancun Protest
by Traci CarlAssociated Press
February 28th, 2001
Injured protesters were loaded into ambulances and tourists strolled past bloodstained streets in this beach resort after police charged a group of anti-globalization demonstrators,kicking and beating those they could catch.

South Africa: Bush Policy Threatens AIDS Prevention Among Youth
by John MurphyBaltimore Sun
February 28th, 2001
But Senne's ambitious plans have been replaced by fears of severe budget cuts. When President Bush announced a ban last month on aid to international organizations that perform or promote abortions, it signaled the end of U.S. funding to Planned Parenthood of South Africa, Senne says.

USA: Mom vs. Mastercard
by Jennifer
February 27th, 2001
Bankruptcy laws were originally established to give people like the Trapps an opportunity to overcome financial misfortunes with a ''fresh start.'' But credit card companies, banks and other lending institutions -- some of President George W. Bush's and Congress's strongest campaign contributors -- say people are abusing the system.

MEXICO: World Economic Forum, Anti-Globalization Protestors Gather in Cancun
Agence France Presse
February 26th, 2001
Anti-globalization activists were set Monday to stage a series of protests against the World Economic Forum gathered here for a two-day meeting, but also said they hoped to meet their opponents in debate.

USA: Supreme Court Sides with American Airlines Over Union
February 26th, 2001
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday let stand a ruling that a pilots union and two of its officers must pay $45.5 million in compensatory damages to AMR Corp.'s American Airlines, the nation's second-largest airline, for refusing to halt a sickout in 1999.

US: Bostonians Outraged at Corporate Subway Sponsorship Plan
by Pamela FerdinandSan Francisco Chronicle
February 26th, 2001
State transportation officials, looking for new revenue, are taking a cue from professional sports arenas and seeking corporate sponsors to purchase naming rights for subway stations here.

Tanzania: World Bank/IMF Refuse to Cancel Africa's Debt
Associated Press
February 24th, 2001
The heads of the World Bank and International Monetary Fund told 12 African leaders it would be impossible to cancel the entire debt of the world's poorest nations, as many have asked.

Canada: Government Fights NAFTA Ruling in Court
Environment News Service
February 23rd, 2001
Canada is asking its own federal court to overturn a North American free trade tribunal ruling that Canada breached trade rules when it banned exports of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste in the 1990s.

USA: The Unimog, Daimler's New Polluter
Deutsche Presse-Agentur
February 22nd, 2001
DaimlerChrysler announced plans Wednesday to produce a version of the German military vehicle, the Unimog, for sale in the United States, with production planned to begin in January.

Canada: Quebec Set to Crackdown on FTAA Protests
by Darryl LerouxAlterNet
February 20th, 2001
From April 20-22, Quebec City has the dubious honour of hosting the 3rd Summit of the Americas. The Summit will bring together 34 heads of state -- every head of state in the Americas except Fidel Castro. And despite stringent security measures, including the largest police deployment in Canadian history, a tremendous contingency of anti-globalization protesters will be there to shake up the process.

USA: Stormy Weather
Environmental News Network
February 16th, 2001
Increasing scientific evidence shows climate change has already started and may be impacting some people more than others. Although scientists predict we will feel the largest impact of global warming in about three decades, extreme weather patterns such as hurricanes, floods and cyclones have increased in recent years.

FRANCE: McDonald's Foe Jose Bové Back in Court
Agence France Presse
February 15th, 2001
Jose Bové, French peasants' champion and hero of the international anti-globalism movement, was due back in court Thursday on trial for his part in the dismantling of a McDonald's restaurant.

USA: The Pharmaceutical Industry Stalks the Corridors of Power
by Julian BorgerThe Guardian Unlimited
February 13th, 2001
In this pantheon of corporate muscle, no industry wields as much power as the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers Association (PhRMA), a pressure group breathtaking for its deep pockets and aggression, even by the standards of US politics.

Mexico: Baja Towns Struggle After Saving Whale Sanctuary
Environment News Service
February 9th, 2001
Communities surrounding Laguna San Ignacio in Baja, Mexico, will receive money from environmental groups that helped stop a plan to convert the last undisturbed nursery for the Pacific gray whale into the worlds largest industrial salt facility.

ECUADOR: Nationwide Protests End with Triumph by Indians
by Kintto LucasInter Press Service
February 7th, 2001
The nationwide protests or ''uprising'' by Ecuador's indigenous people that has brought much of this Andean nation to a standstill over the past two weeks ended Wednesday with the signing of a pact with President Gustavo Noboa, who agreed to lower the price of gasoline, one of the demonstrators' main demands.

Grave Danger Posed Under NAFTA by Unsafe Mexican Trucks
Public Citizen
February 6th, 2001
Although a trade panel is expected this week to order the United States to permit access to all U.S. roads by Mexican trucks, the U.S. should continue to limit access because of the grave dangers many Mexican trucks pose to motorists on U.S. highways, Public Citizen has concluded in a report released today.

USA: Going Bananas
by Michael JessenAlterNet
February 6th, 2001
With a history tied to colonial exploitation, union busting, presidential influence peddling, and environmental degradation, it's obvious the banana is much more than a topping for breakfast cereal or a nutritious snack food. The banana has been at the center of a controversial World Trade Organization ruling and just last month the world's top banana producer (Chiquita Brands International) appeared to teeter on the brink of bankruptcy even as it filed a half-billion dollar lawsuit against the European Union.

AMERICAN SAMOA: Abuses Cited at Apparel Plant That Supplied U.S. Retailers
by Steven GreenhouseThe New York Times
February 6th, 2001
Workers at a factory in American Samoa that made apparel for the J. C. Penney Company and other retailers were often beaten and were provided food so inadequate that some were ''walking skeletons,'' a Labor Department investigation has found.

Ecuador: Army Crackdown Leaves Four Indian Protesters Dead
by Kintto LucasInter Press Service
February 5th, 2001
The protests by indigenous groups against the government's economic austerity policies have brought large areas of the country to a standstill for the past two weeks, intensifying Monday when four people, including a child, were killed when the army cracked down on demonstrators in the Amazon province of Napo.

India: Economy Shaken by Quake
by Ranjit DevrajInter Press Service
February 1st, 2001
According to a top government leader, the Jan. 26 quake, which rated 7.9 on the Richter scale, destroyed property worth more than 100 billion rupees (about two billion U.S. dollars) in western coastal Gujarat state.

Switzerland: UN Chief Enlists ABB CEO to Boost Global Compact
by Jason Topping ConeForum News Daily
January 29th, 2001
United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan called here on Sunday for more corporations to get serious about environmental protection, human rights and labor standards -- and lobbied them to come on board the UN's Global Compact for corporate responsibility.

Pakistan: Shell Under Fire for Pipeline
Environmental News Service
January 29th, 2001
Environmentalists have taken multinational oil giant Shell to court over its plans to build a pipeline for mineral and gas exploration in Pakistan's Kirthar National Park.

SWITZERLAND: UN Chief Warns Business
by Orla RyanBBC News Online
January 28th, 2001
United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan has called on business to work harder on environmental and social issues.

SWITZERLAND: Police Barricade Davos to Prevent Protests
by John A. Dillon and Malini GoelForum News Daily
January 28th, 2001
The police used water cannons and steel fences to stop protesters on Saturday from getting within a mile of the World Economic Forum's Annual Meeting in Davos.

AMERICAN SAMOA: Vietnamese Workers Have Nowhere to Turn
by John GittelsohnOrange County Register
January 28th, 2001
More than 250 Vietnamese garment workers are stranded in American Samoa, lacking money, jobs and fearful of punishment if they return home.

Vietnam: New Export, People
by John GittelsohnOrange County Register
January 28th, 2001
''Sending laborers to work abroad is one of Vietnam's major efforts to settle issues of employment, especially for young people,'' Prime Minister Pham Van Khai said last year

Nigeria: Ogonis Say Arms Were Sponsored by Shell
by Ahamefula Ogbu and Chuks
January 25th, 2001
The multinational oil giant, the Shell Petroleum Development Corporation (SPDC) was yesterday accused of importing arms and ammunitions into the country with which destabilisation was engendered in the Niger Delta.

US: Shoe Manufacturer Latest Casualty to Free Trade
by Justin PopeThe Associated Press
January 22nd, 2001
Sneaker maker Converse Inc., best known for its basketball and ''Chuck Taylor'' brand shoes, is closing three North American production plants and shifting production to Asia as part of a Chapter 11 bankruptcy reorganization.

BRAZIL: World Social Forum Seeks a 'Possible World'
by Mario OsavaInter Press Service
January 22nd, 2001
The World Social Forum, meanwhile, involves leaders and groups with links to the political left and centre-left, who are attempting to build a broad, worldwide organization to take on what they consider the ''exclusive globalisation'' process imposed by the big capitalists who meet in Davos and to prove that ''another world is possible,'' the theory adopted as a the meeting's slogan.

USA: Bush Cabinet Ties to Tobacco Lobby
by Marc KaufmanWashington Post
January 21st, 2001
Thompson, Ashcroft and Norton are among a number of figures in the Bush administration who have been relatively helpful to the tobacco industry and who could take positions that would signal a marked change in the federal government's approach to cigarette makers.

CHINA: Government Refusal to Cut Aid to Farmers Blocks Bid to Join WTO
Bloomberg News
January 16th, 2001
China won't sacrifice income support for farmers in talks this week to join the World Trade Organization, officials and analysts said yesterday.

TURKEY: Court Bans Cyanide Gold Process Near Ancient Town
by Jon GorvettEnvironment News Service
January 16th, 2001
Despite an order from the country's Supreme Court backing up environmentalists, the pressure is mounting this week for the reopening of a controversial mine in one of Turkey's most visited tourist areas.

World: WHO Denounces Interference by Tobacco Industry
by Gustavo CapdevilaInter Press Service
January 16th, 2001
The tobacco industry exerted pressure in Switzerland throughout recent decades to prevent the approval of stricter measures against smoking, says a study sponsored by the World Health Organisation (WHO).

Central America: Earthquake Poses New Threat to Development
by Nfer MuozInter Press Service
January 15th, 2001
The earthquake that left behind death and destruction in El Salvador last Saturday has imposed new obstacles for the development of all Central America, just as the nightmares caused by Hurricane Mitch in 1998 were beginning to dissipate.

Thailand: Premier-Elect for Softening IMF Terms
Inter Press Service
January 11th, 2001
In his first media interview since his party's landslide win in the Jan. 6 national election, telecommunications tycoon Thaksin Shinawatra also said his government would try to soften the ''tough'' terms imposed on Thailand by the International Monetary Fund (IMF).

US: The Corporate Conservative Administration
by Russell Mokhiber and Robert WeissmanFocus on the Corporation
January 11th, 2001
Pushing beyond the corporate corrupting frontiers blazed by the Clinton administration, the Bush team is making clear that it intends to deliver on its campaign promises to strengthen Big Business's grip over government policy-making.

Ecuador: Record Inflation in First Year of 'Dollarization'
by Kintto LucasInter Press Service
January 10th, 2001
The adoption of the dollar a year ago in Ecuador has not been happily accepted by most of the population, who suffered 91 percent inflation in dollars last year, the highest annual rate in the history of the country.

USA/India: Toxic Shipment Under Fire
by Neville JuddEnvironment News Service
January 10th, 2001
Maine's worst mercury polluter is proving to be as controversial in liquidation as when the company was manufacturing caustic soda and chlorine from its Orrington plant on the Penobscot River.

USA: Corporate Friendly Lobbyists Set to Overhaul Policy
by Michael KranishBoston Globe
January 8th, 2001
As President-elect Bush's campaign chairman, Don Evans helped raise nearly $100 million by relying heavily on corporate chieftains who became Bush ''pioneers.'' Now, the commerce secretary nominee is in an extraordinary position to help the business of the pioneers.

USA: Clinton Preserves Pristine Roadless National Forests
by Brian HansenEnvironment News Service
January 5th, 2001
In a move that ranks among the most significant environmental policy initiatives in U.S. history, President Bill Clinton today announced the adoption of a comprehensive strategy that bans road construction and commercial logging on nearly 60 million acres of U.S. Forest Service land.

El Salvador: Dollarization Brings Chaos
by Néfer MuñozInter Press Service
January 5th, 2001
A sense of bewilderment prevailed among El Salvador's poor majority after the introduction of the dollar as legal tender this week, as many people in the informal sector of the economy did not even know how to make change in dollars.

Malaysia: Prime Minister Visits for Business
Inter Press Service
January 4th, 2001
Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad's visit to Burma is mainly for business and not for human rights, critics here say.

USA: Ten Worst Corporations of 2000
by Russell Mokhiber and Robert WeissmanFocus on the Corporation
January 3rd, 2001
Here is the annual Top 10 Worst Corporations of 2000 list compiled by Russell Mokhiber and Robert Weissman. This year, rushing to the head of the pack of irresponsible biotech companies was the French corporation Aventis, the maker of Cry9C corn, sold under the name StarLink.

USA: Combination of Pesticides Linked to Parkinson's Disease
by Cat LazaroffEnvironment News Service
January 3rd, 2001
A combination of two widely used agricultural pesticides - but neither one alone - creates in mice the exact pattern of brain damage that doctors see in patients with Parkinson's disease. The research offers the most compelling evidence yet that everyday environmental factors may play a role in the development of the disease.

US: Activist Group Links Pentagon, Firms to Child Labor
Washington Post
December 22nd, 2000
The Defense Department and five companies, including Sharper Image Corp. and Kohl's Corp., sell goods produced at factories in Asia and Central America that exploit workers, a labor rights group claimed.

USA: Protests Planned at Bush Inauguration
Associated Press
December 22nd, 2000
Demonstrators who shut down a global trade meeting in Seattle last year and brawled with police at the Republican National Convention plan to show up in force for President-elect Bush's inauguration next month.

SWITZERLAND: WTO Still Not Ready for New Round
by Gustavo CapdevilaInter Press Service
December 21st, 2000
One year after the failed World Trade Organisation (WTO) ministerial conference, the hostile climate established in the US city of Seattle with respect to new negotiations to broaden global economic liberalisation persists.

USA: Nurses Organize to Protect Patients
by Michael J. BerensChicago Tribune
December 20th, 2000
Besieged by inadequate staffing, nurses are pushing their calls for reform into the public spotlight. From raucous street rallies to private meetings, the primarily female profession is circumventing a code of silence that, in some hospitals, still mandates that nurses should not speak to a superior unless spoken to first.

USA: Latin America Is Priority on Bush Trade Agenda
by Anthony DePalmaNew York Times
December 18th, 2000
He may not be comfortable discussing unrest in East Timor, or pronouncing the name of the leaders of Turkmenistan, but President-elect George W. Bush considers the rest of the Western Hemisphere "our backyard" and will have several opportunities in his first year in office to make Latin America a trade and foreign policy priority.

Brazil: Unions Want FTAA Put to Popular Vote
by Mario OsavaInter Press Service
December 15th, 2000
Some 700 representatives of the central trade unions of the members of South America's leading trade bloc, the Southern Common Market (Mercosur) - Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay - called on their governments to submit an eventual continent-wide free trade treaty to national plebiscites.

Argentina: Public Fed Up with Austerity
by Elizabeth LoveSan Francisco Chronicle
December 14th, 2000
President Fernando de la Rua's most pressing problem is a cash crunch, in large part a result of interest payments coming due on $144 billion in foreign debt. Investors are concerned that the $280 billion economy cannot grow enough to stay solvent.

USA: Critics Warn Bush Presidency Disastrous for Environment
by Brian HansenEnvironment News Service
December 13th, 2000
Bush briefly outlined a number of issues he plans to address as president, including public education, social security, prescription drug coverage for seniors, tax relief, and strengthening the military. He made no mention of the environment.

USA: Microsoft Settles Temp Lawsuits for $97 Million
by Peggy AndersenAssociated Press
December 13th, 2000
Microsoft agreed to pay $97 million to settle federal lawsuits filed on behalf of thousands of long-term temporary workers, who often received lower pay and fewer benefits than their permanent counterparts.

South Africa: New Treaty Bans Top 12 Toxic Chemicals
Environment News Service
December 11th, 2000
After a week of deliberations to ban the world's most toxic chemicals, delegates have reached an agreement, which ''constitutes a declaration of war on persistent organic pollutants,'' said conference chairman John Buccini.

Ecuador: US Company Drops Bid to Build Pipeline
December 7th, 2000
U.S.-based Williams Cos. Inc. has dropped its bid to build a heavy crude pipeline in Ecuador, a company spokesman said on Thursday.

Kenya: Protests Against World Bank-Driven Land Reforms
by Judith Achieng'Inter Press Service
December 7th, 2000
Kenyan human rights activists are adding their voices to those already opposed to the World Bank driven land reforms, which they say, seek to make land "just another commodity" to be subjected to the whims of market forces, at the expense of millions of landless peasants.

US: It's Not Easy Being Green
by Katharine
December 7th, 2000
The truth is, even policymakers, social scientists, environmentalists and engineers don't really know for sure. Researchers are only now beginning to study what e-commerce means for the Earth.

USA: EPA, General Electric Clash Over Hudson River Cleanup
by Brian HansenEnvironment News Service
December 6th, 2000
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today recommended that the General Electric Company finance a $460 million effort to dredge more than 100,000 pounds of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from a 40 mile stretch of the Hudson River in upstate New York.

Canada: Developed Countries Resume Climate Talks
Environment News Service
December 5th, 2000
According to a report from Earth Negotiations Bulletin, senior officials from key developed countries will resume discussions on the so-called ''crunch''issues, the outstanding areas that caused the breakdown of talks at the 6th Conference of Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP-6), held two weeks ago in The Hague.

NICARAGUA: Pentagon Contracts Nicaraguan Sweatshops
by Steven GreenhouseThe New York Times
December 3rd, 2000
An arm of the Pentagon has come under fire for procuring large quantities of apparel from a Nicaraguan factory that labor rights groups say is a sweatshop and that the United States trade representative has voiced serious concerns about.

Colombia: US Military Aid from the Private Sector
by Paul de la Garza and David AdamsSt. Petersburg Times
December 2nd, 2000
But the Clinton administration quietly has hired a high-level group of former U.S. military personnel whose job far exceeds the narrow focus of the drug war and is intended to turn the Colombian military into a first-class war machine capable of winning a decades-old leftist insurgency.

US: Fights Union Activity
by Steven GreenhouseNew York Times
November 29th, 2000 has come out swinging in its fight to stop a new unionization drive, telling employees that unions are a greedy, for-profit business and advising managers on ways to detect when a group of workers is trying to back a union.

Zambia: Toxics Worry Critics of African Free Trade Pact
by Singy HayonaEnvironment News Service
November 28th, 2000
Environmentalists in Zambia are concerned that a new free trade agreement will open the floodgates for dangerous imported products and industrial wastes.

US: Lockheed Martin's Tests on Humans
Environmental Working Group
November 27th, 2000
On behalf of military contractor Lockheed Martin, Loma Linda University is conducting the first large-scale tests of a toxic drinking water contaminant on human subjects -- a precedent medical researchers and Environmental Working Group condemned as morally unethical and scientifically invalid.

USA: Lockheed Funds Study Using Human Guinea Pigs
by Marla ConeLos Angeles Times
November 27th, 2000
But these human volunteers--recruited by Loma Linda University Medical Center and paid $1,000 apiece--are not testing a new medication. The pills contain an industrial pollutant called perchlorate, a chemical found in rocket fuel.

US: Student Movement is Thriving After Seattle
by Bhumika MuchhalaBoulder Daily Camera
November 25th, 2000
Nov. 30 is the first anniversary of the ''Battle of Seattle.'' As thousands of students joined with trade unionists, environmentalists and others to demonstrate against the World Trade Organization, a new era of protest was dawning.

US: Seattle WTO Protests Mark New Activist Age
by Luis CabreraAssociated Press
November 25th, 2000
The protests that all but shut down last year's World Trade Organization meeting may have been a surprise, but they were no fluke, organizers and observers say.

Netherlands: Climate Talks are Dead, Now It's Time for Action
by Mark LynasOneworld Opinion
November 25th, 2000
The final plenary session of the Sixth Conference of the Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change gave few clues as to the reasons for this failure. Desperate to salvage some credibility from the ashes of this long and complex process, delegates queued up to deliver heart-felt statements of regret and willingness to resume in the near future.

USA: Outlook Bleak for Environment Cleanup
by Danielle KnightInter Press Service
November 23rd, 2000
If deterioration of the global environment over the past several decades is any guide, the coming century does not hold out much promise for reversing these trends, many environmentalists are warning as the millennium comes to a close.

Netherlands: Anger at US Boils Over at Climate Talks
by Robin PomeroyReuters
November 22nd, 2000
Scuffles broke out as over 20 British protesters burst into a room where a group of ministers were negotiating and shouted slogans demanding that the United States, the world's biggest producer of heat-trapping gases, do more to stop climate change.

India: Three Dead in Protests Against Industry Shut Down
by Devinder SharmaEnvironment News Service
November 22nd, 2000
Three people have been killed in violent protests in India's capital city of New Delhi. The four days of protests are against the court ordered closure of about 7,000 polluting industrial facilities.

India: ''Green Revolution'' Bad News for Poor Laborers
by Bharat DograInter Press Service
November 22nd, 2000
Sikri Kalan is a ''Green Revolution'' village. The term is derived from India's three-decade-old farming revolution, which was ushered in by high-yielding wheat crops that helped make the country self-reliant in food.

USA: United Farm Workers Call Off Grape Boycott
by Brian MelleyAssociated Press
November 21st, 2000
In time for Thanksgiving, the United Farm Workers union ended its 16-year ''Wrath of Grapes'' boycott Tuesday -- halting the longest of its three California table grape boycotts.

Colombia: Monsanto, US War on Drugs Poison Environment
by Brian HansenEnvironment News Service
November 20th, 2000
The aerial fumigation program that has grown out of the U.S. government's so-called ''war on drugs'' is endangering the fragile ecosystems and indigenous cultures of Colombia's Amazon Basin, a coalition of groups warned today at a news conference on Capitol Hill.

FRANCE: Yahoo! Ordered To Block Users
by Pierre-Antoine SouchardAssociated Press
November 20th, 2000
In a landmark ruling, a French court on Monday ordered Yahoo! to block French Web users from its auction sites selling Nazi memorabilia.

Netherlands: Oil Companies Wreak Destruction from Arctic Circle to Nigeria
by Mark
November 19th, 2000
As delegates caught up on their sleep during the official day of rest yesterday, speakers were lining up at the 'Climate Justice Summit' to tell their stories of devastation wrought by oil companies. One of the main themes of the conference was an emphasis on the leading role being taken by local communities trying to stop the climate change problem at source by confronting oil and mining companies.

BRUNEI: Clinton Urges Economic Globalization
by Dirk BeveridgeAssociated Press
November 15th, 2000
President Clinton sought to nudge economic globalization forward Wednesday by calling for new world trade negotiations by 2001 -- a deadline developing nations are resisting.

Netherlands: US Position Threatens to Derail Climate Negotiations
by Cat LazaroffEnvironment News Service
November 14th, 2000
The United States has taken a tough stance regarding the compromises it is willing to make in this week's international climate change negotiations in the Netherlands. The U.S. position threatens to alienate the support of some environmental groups, which could be crucial to the successful implementation of the agreement.

Vietnam: US Firms Seek SE Asian Market
by Martin CrutsingerAssociated Press
November 14th, 2000
American business is hungry for a share of the Vietnam market, seeking to meet its demand for soft drinks, consumer products and high-tech telecommunications services and to gain a foothold in the massive rebuilding of a country heavily damaged by U.S. warplanes a quarter-century ago.

USA: Washington Turns a Blind Eye to Union Busting
by Michael
November 14th, 2000
Avante employees had twice voted, in landslide numbers, to align themselves with the Service Employees International Union. Both times, Avante had contested the elections and forced more rounds of voting. Now the company is in an ongoing legal battle with the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) that will likely take several years to resolve.

USA: Cheney Made Millions Off Oil Deals with Hussein
by Martin A. LeeSan Francisco Bay Guardian
November 13th, 2000
During former defense secretary Richard Cheney's five-year tenure as chief executive of Halliburton, Inc., his oil services firm raked in big bucks from dubious commercial dealings with Iraq. Cheney left Halliburton with a $34 million retirement package last July when he became the GOP's vice-presidential candidate

India: Dam Protesters Confront World Bank Chief
by Frederick NoronhaEnvironment News Service
November 13th, 2000
Over a thousand environmental protesters today stormed police barricades in New Delhi, and marched up to the offices of the World Bank, demanding they be allowed to meet with visiting Bank president James Wolfensohn.

USA: Gore Campaign Challenges Florida Vote
by Daniel J. WakinReuters
November 9th, 2000
Vice President Al Gore's campaign announced an all-out effort today to contest Florida's presidential election result, demanding a recount by hand in four counties and promising to support legal challenges as the dispute grew increasingly bitter.

USA: Ralph Nader's No Pat Robertson
by Gregory PalastLeft Labour Review (Britain)
November 8th, 2000
I cast the vote that dare not speak its name: so shoot me, I voted Nader. But my shame is not in electing George W. I'm more nagged by an unflattering parallel between Nader's campaign and the 1988 run for President by that Bible-banging, sticky-fingered televangelist Pat Robertson.

USA: Green Voters Create American Presidential Cliffhanger
Environment News Service
November 8th, 2000
It all comes down to Florida. Despite winning the popular vote by an estimated 220,000 votes, Democratic candidate Vice President Al Gore may yet lose the presidential election, based on a handful of absentee ballots in Florida and the turnout of Green Party voters.

USA: Europeans Sue Big Tobacco
by Suzanne DaleyNew York Times
November 7th, 2000
The European Commission said today that it had filed a civil lawsuit in the United States against the Philip Morris Company and the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company seeking damages for what it called their involvement with organized crime in smuggling cigarettes into Europe.

USA: World Bank and IMF Have Stake in Elections
by Gumisai MutumeInter Press Service
November 5th, 2000
Bush, the Republican candidate for the Nov. 7 US presidential elections, is more leery of the current role of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank, analysts say.

World: Climate Talks Hinge on US Elections
by Marcela ValenteInter Press Service
November 3rd, 2000
The United States has been the key actor in preparatory negotiations leading up to the climate change conference to be held at The Hague this month, leading many to fear that US presidential elections Nov 7 will mean the enactment of the conference's resolutions will be put on hold.

USA: Ex-EPA Head Reilly Accuses Gore of Sell-Out
U.S. Newswire
November 2nd, 2000
Former EPA Administrator William Reilly testified on Tuesday that a top Gore aide encouraged him to issue a trial-burn permit for the WTI incinerator located in East Liverpool -- despite Gore's promises not to before the people of the Ohio River Valley.

World: Climate Change Conference or Business Meeting?
by Marcela ValenteInter Press Service
November 1st, 2000
Delegates from 175 countries are to meet at The Hague in mid-November to hammer out details for satisfying commitments made for curbing emissions of climate-changing greenhouse gases, but environmental activists warn that the discussions leading up to the conference look more like business deals.

USA: Lesser-Evil Voting Is a Hard Sell to His Sons
by Robert ScheerLos Angeles Times
October 31st, 2000
Being a columnist is hardly the influential position it's cracked up to be. For weeks I've been trying to convince Ralph Nader voters that they have an obligation to vote for Al Gore or risk right-wing domination of government's three branches. For me, it's a no-brainer since George W. Bush has named Clarence Thomas and Antonin Scalia as his role models for the three to five Supreme Court appointments he's likely to make.

UN: Report Reveals Dire Global Warming Projections
UN Wire
October 31st, 2000
A new report by the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reveals new evidence that man-made pollution has ''contributed substantially'' to global warming and that the planet is likely to get hotter than previously predicted, the Associated Press reports. The findings are expected to carry great weight in the climate debate over the next decade.

Pacific Islands: Report Says Pacific Reefs, Economies Threatened
UN Wire
October 31st, 2000
Pacific island nations face severe economic decline due to the effects of global warming on coral reefs, which currently represent a key source of income, according to a Greenpeace report released Friday.

UK: Earth Will Get Hotter than Expected
by John VidalThe Guardian Unlimited
October 30th, 2000
Leading climate scientists now agree that human pollution, mainly from fossil fuels, has added substantially to global warming in the past 50 years and that the Earth is likely to get far hotter than previously predicted, with immense consequences for people and wildlife.

India: Anti-Narmada Dam Campaigner on Hunger Strike
by Ranjit DevrajInter Presss Service
October 27th, 2000
Famed anti-Narmada dam campaigner, Medha Patkar, Friday entered the third day of her hunger protest, in the city of Bhopal, the capital of central Madhya Pradesh state. The state is the home of most of the quarter million, mainly indigenous people to be displaced by the four billion-U.S. dollar Sardar Sarovar dam.

World: Enviromentalists Call for Mining Standards
by Danielle KnightInter Press Service
October 25th, 2000
Following January's cyanide spill in Romania and new reports on mining disasters from China, environmentalists are calling for governments worldwide to adopt international mining standards.

USA: World Bank Lambasted for Ignoring Racial Dimension of Poverty
by Gumisai MutumeInter Press Service
October 25th, 2000
Race has become such a scary word to the World Bank that its officials found themselves referring to it as the 'R-word' while responding to charges that the institution had skirted race in its recent World Development Report.

Africa: WHO Enlists Politicians in Anti-Tobacco War
by Judith AchiengInter Press Service
October 25th, 2000
The World Health Organisation (WHO), is targeting African policy-makers, to counter the intensified marketing campaigns by tobacco multinationals in the continent.

South Africa: Cholera Could be Linked to Water Fees
SAPA and Woza News
October 24th, 2000
The cholera outbreak in KwaZulu-Natal, which has claimed 31 lives, could be related to the government's growth, employment and redistribution (GEAR) strategy, the National Health and Allied Workers' Union (Nehawu) said on Monday.

World: WHO Starts Talks On Tobacco Treaty
UN Wire
October 18th, 2000
Government representatives began discussions Monday in Geneva on a proposed anti-tobacco treaty for preventing smoking-related deaths, which are predicted to reach 10 million annually by 2030.

USA: Corporate Giants Begin Greenhouse Gas Trading Program
by Danielle KnightInter Press Service
October 18th, 2000
Seven corporations, including several of the world's largest multinational companies, have joined with an environmental group in seeking ways to trade emission permits to reduce their production of heat-trapping greenhouse gas emissions. But critics say the partnership is just more of the same hot air from the world's fossil fuel industry.

USA: Corporate Giants Begin Greenhouse Gas Trading
Inter Press Service
October 18th, 2000
Seven corporations, including some of the world's largest multinational companies, have joined with an environmental group in seeking ways to trade emission permits to reduce their production of heat-trapping greenhouse gas emissions.

Europe: Biotechnology Mega-Merger
by Jaya RamachandranInter Press Service
October 17th, 2000
The merger of two biotech corporations - the Swiss Novartis and British AstraZeneca - to create the world's biggest agribusiness is alarming some of Europe's largest development agencies.

USA: Chevron-Texaco Merger Criticized
Institute for Public Accuracy
October 16th, 2000
Chevron has just agreed to acquire Texaco for $36 billion. This follows the BP-Amoco and Exxon-Mobil mergers. The following analysts are available for comments.

Venezuela: Oil Workers Strike
by Fabiola SanchezAssociated Press
October 11th, 2000
As tensions mounted between President Hugo Chavez and opposition labor groups, tens of thousands of oil workers went on strike Wednesday to demand higher wages.

Russia: Villagers Dump Radioactive Soil on Parliament's Doorstep
Environment News Service
October 10th, 2000
Villagers from the Chelyabinsk region in the Ural Mountains delivered contaminated soil to the Russian parliament Monday. The soil comes from the gardens and farms that surround the giant Mayak nuclear site. The villagers' protest, which has attracted more than two million signatures on a petition, is at a proposal to allow imports of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.

UK: Aventis Admits Growing Unauthorized GM Seed
Environment News Service
October 10th, 2000
Biotechnology company Aventis admitted Monday that it had grown genetically modified sugar beet without permission at two trial sites in the United Kingdom.

Czech Republic: A World Bank Economist's Odyssey in Kafka's Prague
by Antonio AndradeBusiness World (The Philippines)
October 9th, 2000
Columnist Walden Bello met an old contact from the World Bank during the World Bank-IMF joint annual meetings in Prague, Czech Republic, on Sept. 26 to 28. The following is his account of the events that unfolded around him during that fateful conference. Antonio Andrade is not his real name.

USA: Hotel Chains Rate Poorly on Diversity and Promotion Practices, Says NAACP
by Ron ZapataAssociated Press
October 9th, 2000
The nation's 11 major hotel chains have not kept their promises to improve business opportunities for blacks, the NAACP said Monday in urging people to avoid ''underperforming'' companies.

Kenya: Civil Servants Face Job Loss Due to IMF Policies
by John KamauGemini News Service
October 6th, 2000
Betty Kavila is one of the 25,783 civil servants who are to be retrenched in October as a condition set by the World Bank and International Monetary Fund to resume lending to Kenya.

USA: Nader Challenges Presidential Debate Funding
by Leslie GevirtzReuters
October 6th, 2000
Lawyers for Green Party presidential candidate Ralph Nader sought on Thursday to toss out corporate financing of the presidential debates, arguing before a federal appeals panel that such funding was illegal.

USA: Government Ties Helped Cheney and Halliburton Make Millions
by John RegaBloomberg News
October 6th, 2000
While the comment came in a light-hearted exchange with his Democratic opponent Joe Lieberman, Cheney's reply left out how closely Dallas-based Halliburton's fortunes are linked to the U.S. government. The world's largest oil services firm is a leading U.S. defense contractor and has benefited from financial guarantees granted by U.S. agencies that promote exports.

World: Environment Ministers Plan for Rio+10
by Susana Guzmn OrtegaEnvironment News Service
October 5th, 2000
The ministers are getting ready for Rio+10, a global meeting of world leaders 10 years after the historic 1992 United Nations Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Rio+10 is expected to build on Agenda 21, the plan of work agreed upon at the Earth Summit to conserve the environment.

US: Computers Bad for Kids
by Russell Mokhiber and Robert WeissmanFocus on the Corporation
October 5th, 2000
Last month, the Alliance for Childhood a group of more than 75 educators, child-development and health authorities called for a time-out from the overwhelming pressure on educators and parents to computerize childhood.

USA: Nader Campaign Draws Big Crowds
by Damian WhitworthTimes of London
October 3rd, 2000
If the race for the White House was won by whoever drew the biggest crowd there would be no contest. The next president would be a gaunt man in a crumpled suit who travels on discounted senior citizen's tickets and delivers long, rambling speeches. He is Ralph Nader, the consumer advocate turned Green Party presidential candidate.

Canada: Arctic Pollution Linked to Industrial Plants and Incinerators
by Danielle KnightInter Press Service
October 3rd, 2000
Toxic pollution that has mysteriously entered Canada's pristine Arctic region has now been linked to air emissions from specific municipal waste incinerators, cement kilns and industrial plants in the United States, Canada and Mexico, according to a new study released Tuesday.

Ecuador: Farmers Accuse Logging Firm of Harassment
by Kintto LucasInter Press Service
October 2nd, 2000
The logging firm Botrosa, one of whose partners is Ecuador's Trade Minister Roberto Pea Durini, has been charged in court for harassing peasant farmers and environmentalists in the northwestern province of Esmeraldas, near the Colombian border.

USA: Koch Industries Indicted for Air, Hazardous Waste Violations
by Brian HansenEnvironment News Service
October 2nd, 2000
A Texas based oil conglomerate and four of its employees were indicted last week on 97 counts of violating federal clean air and hazardous waste laws. The charges come less than one year after the company was slapped with the largest civil penalty ever levied under federal environmental statutes.

US: Roundup of Student Activism Against Sweatshops
by Keith MeattoMother Jones
October 1st, 2000
This year's cause celebre was the campaign to end the use of sweatshop labor by the $2.5-billion collegiate apparel industry. Undergraduates nationwide demanded their colleges quit the Fair Labor Association (FLA) -- an industry-backed watchdog that opponents liken to a fox guarding the hen house -- and join the Worker Rights Consortium. Founded by students, academics, and labor unions last October, the WRC promises strict workplace oversight, free from industry influence.

Europe: Biotech Congress Cancelled
Corporate Europe Observer
October 1st, 2000
EuropaBio, the European biotech lobby group, has recently suffered a major blow when it had to cancel its annual congress. The Fourth Annual European Biotechnology Congress was scheduled to take place in Edinburgh, Scotland on October 9-13. According to the Dutch daily newspaper, De Volkskrant, EuropaBio, ''cannot deny that the conference was cancelled due to the fierce critique of genetic engineering in the UK and the resulting lack of sponsors.''

Turkey: Swedish Firm Pulls Out of World Bank Dam Project
Environment News Service
September 29th, 2000
One of the leading partners in a controversial hydroelectric dam project in southeastern Turkey pulled out of the scheme this week.

US: Report Says Global Accounting Firm Overlooks Factory Abuses
by Steven GreenhouseThe New York Times
September 28th, 2000
In a rare inside look at the auditing firms that inspect overseas factories to see whether they are sweatshops, an M.I.T. professor contends that the world's largest factory-monitoring firm does a shoddy job and overlooks many safety and wage violations.

Nicaragua: Banana Workers May Sue International Firms
September 27th, 2000
DBCP, or dibromochloropropane, is one of the pesticides used on Nicaragua's banana plantations in the 1970s. Workers say it has affected 22,000 people, directly or indirectly, and that DBCP-related illnesses have already killed at least 83 of their comrades.

USA: Anti-Tobacco Activists Add Video to Arsenal Before Framework Talks
by Jim LobeInter Press Service
September 27th, 2000
Anti-tobacco activists have added a new weapon to their arsenal in advance of next month's negotiations in Geneva for a global Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC).

Czech Republic: Protesters March on IMF Meeting
September 26th, 2000
Some 5,000 demonstrators marched towards Prague's Congress Centre on Tuesday in a bid to besiege the annual International Monetary Fund and World Bank meetings.

Czech Republic: Festive Demonstrations in Prague
Agence France Presse
September 26th, 2000
The front line was a scene of confrontation, with riot police three-deep stopping protesters, occasionally by leaking tear gas in their direction and by truncheon blows, from advancing toward the Congress Center on the other side of the several-hundred-meter(-yard)-long bridge, where delegates from the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund are holding their annual plenary meeting.

USA: Protesters Disrupt Morning Rush in Washington DC
Washington Post
September 26th, 2000
Police arrested 32 protesters who sat down and linked arms to obstruct the 1900 block of L Street NW during rush hour this morning. The demonstrators were part of a group of 200 who marched and chanted for "global justice" and for the rights of local parking attendants to join a union.

JAPAN: Snow Brand Inc. Merges with Nestle After Food-Poisoning Outbreak
Agence France Presse
September 26th, 2000
The dairy company at the centre of Japan's biggest ever food-poisoning outbreak said Tuesday it was tying up with Swiss giant Nestle, as it unveiled big job cuts in a bid to repair the financial damage.

Czech Republic: Protestors Demand More Action on Debt Relief
September 25th, 2000
International debt relief campaigners took to the streets of Prague on Sunday angrily demanding that the world's creditors finally make good on promises to write off large swathes of poor countries' debts.

India: Farmers Urge 10-Year Moratorium on GM Agriculture
Agence France Presse
September 25th, 2000
A tribunal formed by more than 25 farmers groups in India called Monday for a 10-year national moratorium on the commercial use of genetic engineering in agriculture.

Czech Republic: Havel Brings IMF/WB Face-To-Face with Critics
September 24th, 2000
Czech President Vaclav Havel brought leaders of the IMF and the World Bank together with their critics on Saturday in the hope dialogue would replace demonstrations as the keynote of this week's gatherings.

WORLD: NGOs Tell World Bank "Don't Hijack the Internet"
by Gumisai MutumeInter Press Service
September 21st, 2000
Non-governmental organisations and academics are alarmed over the Global Gateway, a portal website project which the Bank says will be the ''the premier web entry point for information about poverty and sustainable development'' but which the NGOs say is flawed and non-participatory.

USA: Shell to Face Lawsuit for Saro-Wiwa Execution
by Karen McGregorThe Independent
September 19th, 2000
Allegations that the oil multinational Shell aided and abetted the torture and murder of Nigerian activists including the executed writer Ken Saro-Wiwa will be tested by a full jury trial in New York, after the oil company's attempts to have the case thrown out were rejected.

USA: Why I'm Skipping the Olympics
by Kaliya YoungSan Francisco Chronicle (Opinion)
September 17th, 2000
My perspective on the Games gradually shifted. I began to see that my sacrifices were going to be used by the Olympic Games and their sponsors for ends that conflicted with my fundamental values. My competitive performance would not just be a part of a world community gathering to compete in the spirit of fair play, good will and global unity, but rather it would be sold to the highest corporate bidder for their own commercial gain.

UN: G-77 Calls for Rules of Engagement for Corporate Partnerships
Panafrican News Agency
September 16th, 2000
In the second year of UN Secretary General, Kofi Annan's policy of UN engagement with the private sector, the Group of 77 Friday called for appropriate rules to guide such an engagement.

US: Sony Corporation Tracks Environmental Organizations
by Danielle KnightInter Press Service
September 15th, 2000
A leaked document written by Sony Corporation, obtained by IPS, outlines a presentation made in July to fellow electronics companies at a conference in Brussels illustrating the various activities of environmental groups. It names specific US activists who seek to regulate waste caused by the electronics industry.

USA: New Report Examines Commercialism in Schools
by Constance L. HaysNew York Times
September 14th, 2000
From exclusive soft-drink contracts to computers displaying continuous advertising, corporate marketing in public schools is rising sharply. But few states have laws in place to address the phenomenon, and most decisions on commercial arrangements in schools are made piecemeal by local officials, according to a report from the General Accounting Office scheduled to be released today.

AUSTRALIA: U.S. Soccer Players Confront Nike Protestors
Times of India
September 12th, 2000
This was Sunday, the day before the start of the three-day World Economic Forum in Melbourne, the same type of meeting that sparked riots in Seattle last year. The two players just happened to pass one of the demonstrations at a park.

US: Ford/Firestone = Homicide?
by Russell Mokhiber and Robert WeissmanFocus on Corporations
September 12th, 2000
Matthew Hendricks is one of more than 150 deaths around the world linked to Firestone tread separations. The families and friends of those killed in these accidents want to know -- what did Ford and Firestone know about these tires and when did they know it?

Australia: Anti-Globalization Protestors Claim Victory
Agence France Presse
September 11th, 2000
Anti-globalisation campaigners claimed victory Monday after blockading a major international economic conference in a pitched battle with police in which scores of people were hurt.

USA: Billion Dollar NAFTA Challenge to California MTBE Ban
by Cat LazaroffEnvironment News Service
September 11th, 2000
The Canadian challenger, Methanex Corporation, has argued that a plan to remove the toxic chemical MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether) from California's gasoline violates the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

UN: Protests at the Millennium Summit
by Jacki LydenNational Public Radio
September 9th, 2000
Improving health care and education, and ending poverty were some of the resolutions world leaders agreed upon at the United Nations Millennium Summit this week in New York. Participants also pledged to strengthen the UN's role in preventing international conflict.

UN: Don't Bother Looking to the World Body for Help
by Naomi KleinToronto Globe & Mail
September 6th, 2000
This meeting is hosted by the United Nations, which, by its mandate, places human and ecological needs ahead of the voracious demands of the market. Imperfect as the UN system may be, it is generally viewed by critics of globalization as a ray of moral hope on the international stage.

INDIA: 325,000 Telecom Workers Strike over Corporatization Plan
Agence France Presse
September 6th, 2000
Some 325,000 Indian state telecom workers began an indefinite strike Wednesday, to push for guarantees against layoffs and pension losses when their department becomes a corporation next month.

France: Fuel Prices Ignite Protests
Financial Times
September 6th, 2000
French riot police prevented farmers from blocking freight access to the Channel Tunnel as protests against petrol prices continued to escalate.

Czech Republic: Prague Prepares for Anti-Globalization Protests
UN Wire
September 5th, 2000
The International Monetary Fund and World Bank will hold their annual meeting in Prague next month, attracting nearly 18,000 officials, private bankers and journalists, as well as 20,000-40,000 protesters.

USA: Alternative Summit Meetings Examine Globalization
by Grant McCoolReuters
September 5th, 2000
Activists, businessmen and government leaders met on Tuesday in the shadow of the U.N. Millennium Summit, agonizing over the future of economic globalization following the disruption of the WTO in Seattle and how to narrow the widening gap between rich and poor.

CHINA: McDonald's Fires Underage Workers
Associated Press
September 4th, 2000
Scores of underage workers hired in a mainland China factory that makes toys for McDonald's were fired following recent media reports about the situation, a Hong Kong labor-monitoring group said Monday.

UN: Globalization Tops Agenda for World Leaders at Millenium Summit
by Barbara CrossetteNew York Times
September 3rd, 2000
The stormy battle over globalization that brought protests to the streets of Seattle and Washington moves this week to the heart of the world's only truly global organization, the United Nations.

USA: Ralph Nader's Racial Blindspot
by Vanessa DanielColorlines
September 1st, 2000
By contrast, Ralph Nader is actually addressing some of the big issues affecting people of color. In tackling thorny topics such as corporate globalization, environmental abuse and child poverty, Nader often speaks to problems that have their most devastating affects in communities of color.

UN: Making Peace with Power
by George MonbiotThe Guardian
August 31st, 2000
The United Nations Centre on Transnational Corporations, which tried to help weak nations to protect themselves from predatory companies, had recommended that businesses should be internationally regulated. The UN refused to circulate its suggestions.

MEXICO: Country Ordered to Pay US Company $17 Million for NAFTA Violations
by Danielle KnightInter Press Service
August 31st, 2000
An international trade tribunal based here has ruled that Mexico violated the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and ordered the government to pay 16.7 million dollars to a US company.

Mexico: Environmentalist Found Guilty, Rights Groups Protest
New York Times
August 29th, 2000
In closing a case that has led to outrage among environmental groups around the world, a district judge in the state of Guerrero found Rudolfo Montiel Flores guilty today of drugs and weapons crimes and sentenced him to nearly seven years in prison.

JAPAN: Police Raid Mitsubishi Motors
Business Recorder
August 28th, 2000
Japanese police investigators raided the offices of Mitsubishi Motors Corp on Sunday on suspicion of concealing customer complaints and recalls from government inspectors for decades, Kyodo news agency reported.

US: McDonald's Uses Sweatshop
Associated Press
August 27th, 2000
Snoopy, Winnie the Pooh and Hello Kitty toys sold with McDonald's meals in Hong Kong are made at a mainland Chinese sweatshop that illegally employs child laborers to package the toys, a newspaper reported Sunday.

USA: Behavior in Nazi Era Examined
Associated Press
August 27th, 2000
The country that would prefer to be known more for its World War II heroism will take its turn in examining how some in corporate America and official Washington also failed Hitler's victims.

USA: Chevron Will Pay $7 Million for Clean Air Violations
by Cat LazaroffEnvironment News Service
August 24th, 2000
Chevron USA, the second largest U.S. oil company, has agreed to pay a $6 million fine and spend $1 million on environmental improvements to settle a federal lawsuit over Clean Air Act violations at a California offshore oil terminal.

UK: GMO Crop Testing Approved
Environment News Service
August 24th, 2000
Unperturbed by threats of legal action from environmental groups, the UK's agriculture ministry announced Wednesday that it will allow genetically modified (GM) crop trials to go ahead this fall.

India: Outcry at Police Action Against Dam Protestors
by Danielle KnightInter Press Service
August 24th, 2000
Human rights and environmental groups are condemning state police in India for preventing about 500 people from attending a public hearing on a controversial dam planned for the Narmada river.

Germany: Farben to Create Slave Labor Fund
Associated Press
August 23rd, 2000
IG Farben, the German chemical company that made poison gas for Nazi death camps, will set up a compensation fund for Nazi-era slave laborers within weeks, an official in charge of liquidating the once-great firm said Wednesday.

Brazil: Grassroots Referendum on Foreign Debt
by Axel BuggeReuters
August 23rd, 2000
Worries by Brazil's government over plans by a grassroots movement to hold a plebiscite on the country's huge debt costs gathered steam this week as the vote aiming to force attention on deep social inequalities approached.

NICARAGUA: US Retailers Contract with Sweatshops
by Carrie AntlfingerAssociated Press
August 22nd, 2000
Gonzalez was one of two workers invited Monday to recount conditions at two Nicaraguan factories that human rights, religious and labor groups claim supply Kohl's Department Stores with cheap garments.

Canada: Sweet-Scented Pesticide 'Sugarcoats a Toxic Pill'
by Andrew DuffyOttawa Citizen
August 20th, 2000
An association that represents Ontario lawn-care companies is selling cherry and bubble-gum flavoured scents to mask the smell of toxic pesticides.

Bangladesh: Shell Oil Drilling Threatens Tiger Preserve
by Jonathan LeakeSunday Times of London
August 20th, 2000
SHELL, the Anglo-Dutch oil company, is planning to survey the world's biggest tiger reserve after company geologists pinpointed it as one of the richest potential sources of oil and gas on earth.

TURKEY: Dam Will Destroy Kurdish Culture, Say Critics
August 16th, 2000
A Kurdish human rights lawyer is spearheading an international campaign to block the Turkish government's efforts to build a dam he says will dislodge thousands of Kurds and destroy archeological artifacts.

USA: Corporate Media Misses Protest Story, Focuses on Violence
by Tamara StrausAlterNet
August 16th, 2000
It was an odd fact of the demonstrations surrounding the Democratic Convention in Los Angeles that the only protests to get mass media coverage were those where cops moved in and arrested people.

Australia: Fosters Beer to Drop Greenhouse Gas Refrigerants
Environment News Service
August 16th, 2000
One month before the opening ceremony for the 2000 Olympic Games, Greenpeace Australia has issued a report card to the Games that shows Sydney has failed to live up to the promise of the so-called Green Games.

USA: Los Angeles Police Defend Crackdown on Protest
by Arthur SpiegelmanReuters
August 15th, 2000
Civil liberties groups threatened to sue the Los Angeles Police Department Tuesday, saying it shot innocent people in the back with rubber bullets as they peacefully left a Democratic Convention protest, but the city's top cop said he felt good about police actions.

USA: Los Angeles Activists Target Corporate Greed
by Christine HanleyAssociated Press
August 14th, 2000
Activists organized protests against corporate greed, oil company abuses and the lack of campaign finance reform to mark Monday's opening of the Democratic National Convention.

USA: Oil Corporations Woo Democrats
Associated Press
August 14th, 2000
While Democrats will be partying all across Tinseltown this week, these events go far beyond typical convention-week soirees. Each is aimed at the Democrat who would take over a key committee if the party managed to regain control of Congress in the November elections.

USA: Los Angeles Hotel Workers Fight Back
by Jennifer BleyerAlterNet
August 14th, 2000
While Democratic visitors inside the posh Loews Santa Monica Beach Hotel gussied themselves up for yesterday evening's events, dozens of hotel workers and hundreds of supporters rallied outside the hotel for their right to organize. Taking advantage of this week's national spotlight on Los Angeles to publicize their struggle, the rally, which was sponsored by the Hotel Employees and Restaurant Employees Union, Local 814, included appearances by Minnesota Senator Paul Wellstone, AFL-CIO President John Sweeney, and Rev. Jesse Jackson.

USA: U'wa March Trashes Gore
by Tamara StrausAlterNet
August 14th, 2000
To put it mildly, the U'wa are a touchy issue for Gore. The presidential candidate owns between $500,000 and $1 million in Occidental stock and his father, Al Gore Sr., served as chair of the board for 28 years, earning an annual salary of $500,000. The elder Gore was such a close political ally of the company that Armand Hammer, Occidental's founder and CEO, liked to say that he had Gore ''in my back pocket.''

India: World Bank Admits Failure of Coal Project
UN Wire
August 14th, 2000
According to the report, thousands of villagers in eastern and central India received no compensation after state-owned Coal India used a $530 million loan from the World Bank in 1997 to raze their homes in a coal mine modernization scheme. Although resettling, compensating and retraining farmers as entrepreneurs was part of the loan deal, Coal India had no experience in these activities and was unable to carry them out.

SWITZERLAND: Report Calls WTO 'Nightmare'
by Robert EvansReuters
August 11th, 2000
A United Nations-appointed study team has labeled the World Trade Organization a ''nightmare'' for developing countries and suggested the body should be brought under the U.N.'s purview.

The United Nations Sits in Suspicious Company
by Joshua Karliner and Kenny BrunoInternational Herald Tribune
August 10th, 2000
At the UN meeting, the leaders of corporations well known for running sweatshops, engendering environmental disaster and colluding in human rights violations sat at the table with Mr. Annan. They agreed to adhere to and publicly promote the Global Compact's nine core principles of universally accepted labor, environmental and human rights values.

USA: Lieberman's Big Donations From Big Businesses
by Elizabeth ShogrenLos Angeles Times
August 9th, 2000
An analysis of campaign-finance records released yesterday by the nonpartisan Center for Responsive Politics also showed that Lieberman has received more contributions this election cycle from insurance companies than any other senator.

USA: Reform Party Suffers Raucous Split
by Megan GarveyLos Angeles Times
August 9th, 2000
A meeting of Reform Party leaders in Long Beach erupted in chaos Tuesday, with screaming, shoving matches, a walkout by loyalists to party founder Ross Perot and a declaration that social conservative Pat Buchanan is now guaranteed the fractured party's presidential nomination.

USA: BP's Arctic Oil Project Stalled as Greenpeace Occupies Barge
by Neville JuddEnvironment News Service
August 7th, 2000
The environmental group Greenpeace International says it took the action this morning because British Petroleum's (BP) Northstar Development will fuel global warming and open the Arctic to offshore oil expansion.

USA: Joe Lieberman, Bad For The Jews, Bad For The Country
by Michael LernerExcerpted from
August 7th, 2000
Among the candidates considered by Al Gore for the vice-presidential nomination, Joseph Lieberman is likely to accelerate the process in which the two major parties seem to be merging into one pro-business, pro-wealthy, elitist, and morally tone-deaf governing force.

USA: Bush the Main Act for TV Convention
by Frazier MooreAssociated Press
August 4th, 2000
Humorist Bill Maher began ABC's ''Politically Incorrect'' Thursday with rousing words. ''We finally had the big moment tonight that America was waiting for at the Republican National Convention,'' he said. ''The end.''

USA: Novartis Phasing Out Genetically Engineered Foods
by Neville JuddEnvironment News Service
August 4th, 2000
Novartis, one of the world's leading producers of genetically engineered seeds, has been phasing out genetically engineered ingredients in its food products worldwide for over a year.

US: Lockheed Martin's Promotional Film
by Jacques PerettiGuardian (London)
August 3rd, 2000
The slick, multimillion dollar productions of Lockheed and Boeing are in a different class. After watching hours of these corporate arms videos, one is struck not by the weaponry or the technology but the absence of human beings. The few faces that do appear, fleetingly, are partially hidden behind visors and clad in fireproof space suits, pressing buttons. The complete invisibility of the victims of war that first became apparent to the world during the Gulf war has reached its logical conclusion in the arms video. The average 15-year-old boy would see more bloodshed playing Doom in his bedroom.

Germany: Biotech Foods ''Conquer'' Supermarkets
Environment News Service
August 2nd, 2000
A German government backed consumer foundation has reported that over one-third of food products it tested contained either genetically modified (GM) soya or maize (corn).

USA: Protests Rock GOP, End in 282 Arrests
by John NicholsThe Nation
August 1st, 2000
''Whose streets? Our streets!'' chanted thousands of activists as they poured into the downtown Philadelphia for what may well have been the most raucous day of demonstrations outside a national convention since Chicago in 1968.

USA: GOP's Empty Promises to People of Color
by Richard FellingerPhiladelphia Weekly
August 1st, 2000
This marks the second consecutive convention in which the GOP is trying to sell itself to minorities and progressive whites. Remember that patronizing ''big-tent'' rhetoric from San Diego four years ago?

CHINA: China WTO Deal Imminent
Associated Press
August 1st, 2000
Mexico expects to sign an agreement with China ''very soon'' on the communist nation's entry into the World Trade Organization, Mexico's foreign minister said Tuesday.

World: Cigarette Firms Tried to Foil WHO, Say Investigators
by Gordon FaircloughWall Street Journal
August 1st, 2000
World Health Organization investigators say Philip Morris Co. and other multinational cigarette makers worked for years to discredit the agency and thwart its efforts to curb smoking around the globe.

USA: Anti-Poverty Activists March in Philadelphia
by David MorganReuters
July 31st, 2000
Thousands of protesters, led by people in wheelchairs, marched on the Republican National Convention on Monday to demand economic rights for people oppressed by poverty and homelessness.

Czech Republic: IMF Prepares for Prague Demonstrations
Associated Press
July 31st, 2000
The director of the International Monetary Fund said Monday he is confident that authorities in Prague are ready to handle possible riots during the IMF and World Bank meeting that will be held in the Czech capital in September.

USA: Touring the Real Philly
by Jennifer BleyerAlterNet
July 30th, 2000
''There are 250,000 families living below the poverty line in Philadelphia, and 40,000 abandoned houses that the city has boarded up. That's an incredible disconnect that the Republicans won't be talking about this week!'' shouts activist Tamzin Cheshire.

USA: Iowa Proposes ''Immigrant Enterprise Zones''
by Frank TrejoDallas Morning News
July 30th, 2000
The panel wants Iowa to be designated an ''immigration enterprise zone'' so the state could seek exemptions from federal immigration quotas, making it easier for people to move to Iowa and work there.

Burma: Cheney, Milosevic and Premier Oil Do Business with Junta
The Guardian (London)
July 28th, 2000
What do Dick Cheney, Slobodan Milosevic and the British company Premier Oil have in common? Answer: they all firmly believe in doing business with Burma, home to perhaps the world's most oppressive regime.

USA: African-American Community Takes a Deeper Look at Ralph Nader
by Cedric
July 28th, 2000
The logic, according to Democrats and Gore supporters is that by voting for Ralph Nader, people are only taking votes away from Al Gore and helping Gov. Bush walk into the White House -- directly benefiting from Gore's loss of the traditional Democratic votes that Nader represents. But can any self-respecting Black honestly say that Blacks have benefited under Clinton-Gore -- enough to automatically extend their reign for another 4 years -- with no questions asked?

U.N. Signs Up with Big Business to Promote Values
by Richard RothCNN
July 27th, 2000
The corporations, which were welcomed to U.N. Headquarters Wednesday by Secretary-General Kofi Annan, are paying big money to be able to say they are supporting the missions of the U.N.

UN: Annan Says Only Open Markets Can Ease World Poverty
July 26th, 2000
Open markets offer the only realistic hope for lifting billions of people in developing countries out of poverty while maintaining prosperity in the industrial world, U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan said Wednesday.

UN: Multinationals Sign Pact on Rights and Environment
by Joseph KahnNew York Times
July 26th, 2000
Some 50 multinationals joined 12 labor associations and watchdog groups to sign a ''global compact'' that commits them to support human rights, eliminate child labor, allow free trade unions and refrain from polluting the environment wherever they do business.

India: Government Under Fire for Allowing GE Cotton Trials
by Ranjit DevrajInter Press Service
July 26th, 2000
The Indian government's decision to allow field trials of the controversial genetically-engineered (GE) cotton has come under flak from farmers' rights activists who allege this would ruin thousands of tillers in the country.

USA: Bolivia Makes the Style Page; Anti-Corporate Protests Ignored
by Gregory PalastWashington Post
July 26th, 2000
In April, five people were shot dead in Bolivia, a military policeman was lynched and the president declared a state of siege following a general strike that shut down much of the nation. At the end of it all, for the first time in a decade anywhere in the world, American and British corporate giants, the targets of the protest, were booted out of the Andean nation, a stunning reversal of the march of globalization.

USA: Dick Cheney's Oil Connections
Drillbits and Tailings (Project Underground)
July 25th, 2000
Having ensured the continued flow of cheap oil from the Gulf by waging a war with Iraq, and after his boss, George Bush's ouster from office by Clinton in 1992, Dick Cheney turned his attention to the corporate world.

INDONESIA: International Union Steps into Sony Dispute
Jakarta Post
July 25th, 2000
An international union has stepped into the dispute surrounding the dismissal of 928 workers from PT Sony Electronics Indonesia.

USA: Former Monsanto Lobbyist Appointed to Represent Consumers on GE Food Issues
by Tom AbateSan Francisco Chronicle
July 24th, 2000
Leading consumer and environmental groups are fuming because the Clinton administration has appointed a former Monsanto Corp. lobbyist to represent U.S. consumers on a transatlantic committee set up to avoid a trade war over genetically engineered foods.

USA: Health Care Firms Spend Big to Head Off Reforms
by Jeff LeedsLos Angeles Times
July 23rd, 2000
With billions of dollars in profits on the line, the health care industry is waging the largest national advertising campaign ever conducted by a political special interest, with a price tag for the election cycle that could approach $90 million--more than either of the major presidential candidates is expected to spend.

SOUTH ASIA: Digital Divide Sharpens Rich-Poor Gap
by Ranjit DevrajInter Press Service
July 21st, 2000
South Asia has emerged as the most promising region for sourcing information technology (IT) expertise, but this is an achievement that is of use only to the rich nations, say critics.

G8: Thousands Form Human Chain Around US Airbase in Japan
July 20th, 2000
OKINAWA, Japan -- More than 27,000 people linked hands under the bright skies of Japan's Okinawa island on Thursday in a dramatic protest against U.S. forces there.

USA: A Civics Lesson for Big Tobacco
by Russell Mokhiber and Robert WeissmanFocus on the Corporation
July 18th, 2000
The $145 billion punitive damage award against the tobacco industry in the Engle case in Florida should be celebrated as evidence of a civil justice system that works, proof of the value of juries and a major public health achievement.

EU: Ban on Controversial Pesticide Recommended
Environment News Service
July 18th, 2000
The controversial insecticide lindane could be subject to a partial ban by the Europe Union's 15 member countries within 18 months.

EU: Commission Bows to US Pressure on GMOs
Environment News Service
July 13th, 2000
The European Union is trying to regain the public's confidence in genetically modified organisms (GMOs) by strengthening the laws that govern their release onto the market.

South Africa: IMF Can Only Bring Misery
by Trevor Ngwane and George DorThe Sowetan
July 12th, 2000
Last Friday, Horst Koehler, newly-appointed head of the International Monetary Fund, received a hostile response from the anti-privatisation forum, Jubilee 2000, the campaign against neoliberalism and the South African Communist Party.

USA: Fronting for Big Coal
by Russell Mokhiber and Robert WeissmanFocus on the Corporation
July 11th, 2000
So, we're sitting in our office, and under the door comes a note advising us that there will be a press conference the next day where African-American and Hispanic groups will release a report showing how minority populations will suffer most if the United Nations Global Warming Treaty (Kyoto agreement) passes the U.S. Senate.

Philippines: 100 Bodies Found in Garbage Slide
Environment New Service
July 11th, 2000
MANILA, Philippines -- Philippine search and rescue workers have recovered 100 bodies from the Payatas garbage dump after torrential rains brought down the mountain of garbage in the northern Manila suburb of Quezon city.

USA: Army of Protestors Prepare to Greet GOP
by Thomas GinsbergPhiladelphia Inquirer
July 9th, 2000
Three weeks before Republicans hold their national convention, it appears the number of protesters gathering in Philadelphia could rival the 30,000 delegates and party members attending the convention itself.

US: Info-Cleansing on the Web
by Marcia StepanekBusiness Week Online
July 7th, 2000
Beware the public relations person with a modem. Now corporate spinmeisters, too, can go online to track customers -- especially the disgruntled ones who vent their spleen in cyberspace.

Mexico: Victory For Democracy or Neoliberalism?
by Dan La BotzMexican Labor News and Analysis
July 7th, 2000
Vicente Fox Quesada, the former Coca Cola executive, rancher and businessman from the conservative National Action Party (PAN) won Mexico's presidential election on July 2 ending 71 years of rule by the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI).

Pakistan: Corporate Farms Worry Food Activists
by Muddassir RizviInter Press Service
July 7th, 2000
ISLAMABAD -- The Pakistani government is inviting foreign business into the country's farms, giving rise to fears that this will finish off millions of small tillers and reduce national food supply.

USA: World Bank Out of Chinese Resettlement Project
by Gumisai MutumeInter Press Service
July 7th, 2000
WASHINGTON -- The World Bank has caved in to pressure from one of the biggest anti-World Bank campaigns by non-governmental organisations forcing China to use its own funds to resettle farmers on Tibetan territory.

Mexico: President Elect Brings Business Approach to Governing
by Diego CevallosInter Press Service
July 4th, 2000
MEXICO CITY -- Mexico's president-elect Vicente Fox said Tuesday that the change of government would be smooth and crisis-free, and that his absolute top priority would be the fight against poverty.

Brazil: Activists Outraged by Decision on GM Crops
by Mario OsavaInter Press Service
July 4th, 2000
RIO DE JANEIRO -- The Brazilian Consumers Defence Institute (IDEC) asked the courts to issue arrest warrants for the members of a government scientific commission that gave the go-ahead to imports of transgenic corn, on the argument that the decision was released in violation of the law.

Ecuador: Janitors Write Demands in Blood
Associated Press
July 4th, 2000
QUITO, Ecuador -- A group of striking public hospital janitors used their own blood Tuesday, drawn with hypodermic needles, to write out their demands for salary increases, better working conditions and greater job security.

USA: Time to Cap Big Oil's Profit Gusher
by Russell Mokhiber and Robert WeissmanFocus on the Corporation
July 3rd, 2000
The startling concentration of economic power that has resulted from the U.S. merger wave of the last several years is going to require new levels of government intervention in the marketplace.

USA: Oil Money Gushing into Bush Campaign
by H. Josef HebertAssociated Press
July 3rd, 2000
WASHINGTON -- While locked in a string of disputes with the Clinton administration, the oil industry has pumped more than $1.5 million into George W. Bush's campaign. Oil companies will be seeking Bush's help on a range of issues, should he be elected president.

USA: Spying for Free Trade
by Duncan Campbell and Paul LashmarThe Independent (UK)
July 2nd, 2000
It is the new Cold War. The United States intelligence agencies, facing downsizing after the fall of the Berlin wall, have found themselves a new role spying on foreign firms to help American business in global markets.

FRANCE: José Bové a 'French Gandhi'?
by Charles BremnerTimes of London
July 1st, 2000
The anti-capitalist campaigner José Bové compared himself to Gandhi when he went on trial yesterday for demolishing a McDonald's restaurant in a southern French market town.

UK: Corporate Control of the Genome Only the Beginning
by George MonbiotThe Guardian (UK)
June 29th, 2000
Nearly everyone debating the mapping of the human genome now agrees on one thing: that the identification of our genes invokes an unprecedented danger, as it might assist a handful of companies to seize something which belongs to all of us. I wish this were true.

Nigeria: Court Fines Shell $40 Million for 1970 Spill
Environment News Service
June 26th, 2000
PORT HARCOURT, Nigeria -- A Rivers State High Court in Port Harcourt has ordered Royal Dutch/Shell to pay US$40 million in compensation for an oil spill which happened in 1970 in Ogoniland.

South Africa: AIDS Protestors Picket Pfizer
Associated Press
June 26th, 2000
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa About 100 picketers demonstrated Monday outside the offices of the Pfizer drug company, saying its offer of free treatment for an AIDS-related brain infection was insufficient.

UN: NGOs to Voice Concerns at Development Summit
Agence France Presse
June 22nd, 2000
GENEVA -- Nearly 100 Non-Governmental Organisations (NGO) are gathering here to make their concerns and criticisms heard ahead of a United Nations summit starting Monday to assess global social development.

USA: Environmentalists Question Uganda Dam Project
by Danielle KnightInter Press Service
June 22nd, 2000
WASHINGTON -- World Bank funding should not go toward building a large hydroelectric dam in Uganda when smaller scale renewable energy, like wind and solar, would more likely benefit the East African nation's rural poor, according to environmental groups here.

USA: City Sues Big Oil for Millions Over Polluted Drinking Water
by Timna TannersReuters
June 21st, 2000
SANTA MONICA -- The California beach city of Santa Monica is suing 18 oil companies for damages that could exceed $200 million, claiming that the firms polluted drinking water wells with the possibly cancer-causing gasoline additive MTBE.

Canada: Farmer v. Monsanto
by Fred BridglandEnvironment News Service
June 19th, 2000
Saskatchewan, Canada -- On the Great Plains of Canada, farmer Percy Schmeiser has engaged in a David v. Goliath battle which could save farmers and consumers around the world from a genetically modified food nightmare beyond anything they have experienced so far.

Canada: Raffi Says No to Ads for Kids
by Raffi CavoukianToronto Globe & Mail
June 19th, 2000
Throughout my 20-plus years of making music for children, the core value at the heart of my work has been respect for the young child as a whole person. I have not accepted any offers to do commercial endorsements because I believe it's wrong to use one's popularity to sell products to a vulnerable audience.

PERU: Mercury from Gold Mine Dumped in Transit
Environment News Service
June 16th, 2000
Eight people have been hospitalized including a woman in critical condition following a mercury spill near the Minera Yanacocha mine, 600 kilometers (375 miles) north of Lima, Peru.

Fiji: Timber's Role in Coup
by David RobieGemini News Service
June 14th, 2000
As the political crisis in Fiji twisted and turned on an almost daily basis following the seizure of the Prime Minister and a group of other hostages, a pre-coup controversy over millions of dollars' worth of mahogany was forgotten. A Gemini News Service correspondent looks at a timber dispute that is not yet over.

EU: Anti-Sweatshop Campaign Targets Adidas
by Peter DhondtInter Press Service
June 9th, 2000
Anti-sweatshop pressure groups are protesting against sporting goods manufacturer, Adidas, being one of the major sponsors of Euro 2000, the European Football Championship that kicks off here Saturday.

USA: ExxonMobil Shareholders Use Stock to Push Change
by Jonathan FoxDallas Observer
June 8th, 2000
As with other behemoth multinational companies, Irving-based ExxonMobil's annual meeting is strictly a formality. Most of the crowd that packed the Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center in downtown Dallas to vote on shareholder resolutions last week were retirees who own relatively small amounts of company stock.

World: General Electric's Global Assault
by Russell Mokhiber and Robert WeissmanMother Jones
May 26th, 2000
While the 20-reign of General Electric's CEO has been a golden era for shareholders - the company's stock value has risen three time more than the Dow Jones average, leading Forbes magazine to name Welch the "Most Admired CEO of the Century" - it has been a disaster for employees.

Corn Growers Submit Recommendations to USDA on Agricultural Biotechnology
News and Views (American Corn Growers Association)
May 8th, 2000
The American Corn Growers Association (ACGA) has submitted comments to the United States Department of Agriculture's Advisory Committee on Agricultural Biotechnology. These comments include sixteen (16) recommendations that will protect agricultural producers in this whole debate over genetically modified (GMO) crops.

USA: Earth Day 2000 Targets Global Warming, Clean Energy
Inter Press Service
April 20th, 2000
In Earth Day 2000 celebrations around the globe, environmentalists plan to highlight the culprits of global warming and the solutions: renewable energy, including wind and solar.

AFRICA: Illegal Diamond Trade Funds War in Sierra Leone
April 19th, 2000
Peace cannot be sustained in Sierra Leone until controls are imposed on the illegal selling of diamonds used to finance its civil war, according to a recent study.

USA: Activists Target IMF Meeting
by John MadeleyThe Observer (London)
April 9th, 2000
Their target in Washington is the spring meetings of the Bank and International Monetary Fund, which begin next Sunday. The protest campaign against the sister institutions begins tomorrow with the launch an international campaign to persuade corporate investors not to buy World Bank bonds.

MEXICO: Environmental Prize Awarded Early to Jailed Farmer-Ecologist
Environment News Service
April 5th, 2000
Because Montiel has been in prison since May 2, 1999, the Goldman Prize jury decided to announce this year's Prize for North America 12 days early in the hope that an early announcement will have a positive impact on his trial.

USA: Occidental Chairman Sues Protestors for Harassment
by Timna TannersReuters
April 4th, 2000
The chairman of Occidental Petroleum is staging his own protest against the human rights groups who picket his home and office --he is suing them for harassment and wants a court to grant him damages.

US: A Blank Check from Washington for Colombia's Dirty War
by Mark WeisbrotAlterNet
April 1st, 2000
One of the problems with deleting our government's worst crimes from America's historical hard drive is that they tend to recur. How many people even know the hideous story of how we supported and financed the slaughter of tens of thousands innocent civilians, teachers, health care and church workers in Central America in the 1980s?

US: Slashing Safety?
by Nina ShapiroSeattle Weekly
April 1st, 2000
Is Boeing compromising on safety in order to cut costs? Some workers believe so, pointing to changes in the way the company carries out inspections. A former head of the National Transportation Safety Board, among others, seems to agree.

USA: Where Was the Color at A16 in DC?
by Colin RajahColorLines
April 1st, 2000
After Seattle, the movement set its sights on mobilizing for the annual Spring meetings of the World Bank and International Monetary Fund (IMF) in Washington, D.C. this past April 16. Known as A16, these actions were also hugely successful.

SRI LANKA: Massive Protest Against US Mining Project
Inter Press Service
March 30th, 2000
Scientists, trade unionists and priests joined farmers from a northeast Sri Lanka village on Thursday in a massive protest in the capital against government plans to hand over phosphate mines to a US-based transnational company (TNC).

USA: Oxy CEO Confronted by U'wa Leader in Congresswoman's Office
Environment News Service
March 30th, 2000
A surprise encounter in the Congressional office of Georgia Representative Cynthia McKinney today brought the vice president of Occidental Petroleum face to face with the president of the U'wa indigenous people who are fighting the company's oil drilling on their traditional land in Colombia.

Burma: US Oil Giant Pulls Out of Country
Agence France Presse
March 29th, 2000
Oil services provider Baker Hughes has become the latest United States firm to pull out of Burma, human rights campaigners and the firm's local partner said Wednesday.

USA: Over 2,500 Challenge Biotech Industry To Debate
by Raphael Lewis and Jamal E. WatsonBoston Globe
March 27th, 2000
Despite fears of violence in the streets, an estimated 2,500 chanting, costumed demonstrators kept their promise to march peacefully through the Back Bay yesterday as they voiced their opposition to the spread of biotechnology.

US: High Court Considers Massachusetts Anti-Burma Law
by Steven MufsonWashington Post
March 23rd, 2000
Tearing a page from the anti-apartheid movement, the two drew up legislation that penalized companies with ties to Burma when those firms competed for Massachusetts state contracts. Using the draft of an anti-apartheid bill, they crossed out South Africa and inserted Burma. Two years later, the measure became law.

Philippines: Strike Over Gas Hike Paralyzes Southern City
by Edwin O. Fernandez and Charlie C. SeasePhilippine Daily Inquirer (Internet Edition)
March 23rd, 2000
Jeepney drivers and operators, slumdwellers and other sectoral representatives yesterday took to the streets to demand an oil price rollback and the resignation or ouster of President Estrada.

Bulgaria: Up to 10,000 Protest IMF Ausertity
Associated Press
March 22nd, 2000
Up to 10,000 people gathered in downtown Sofia on Wednesday to protest the country's unemployment, poverty and temporary-employment contracts.

USA: Trade Unionists from 20 Countries Challenge General Electric's Globalization
by Jim LobeInter Press Service
March 22nd, 2000
Union leaders from 20 countries are gathering here this week to co-ordinate efforts to deal with the aggressive globalisation strategy of the US-based multinational giant, General Electric Company (GE).

USA: IMF on the Ropes
by Russell Mokhiber and Robert WeissmanFocus on Corporations
March 21st, 2000
But these jujitsu tactics may be running out of steam. Political momentum against the IMF ratcheted up in recent weeks, when the Meltzer Commission, a bipartisan advisory commission to the U.S. Congress, released its report.

USA: High Court Rules FDA Lacks Power Over Tobacco
by James ViciniReuters
March 21st, 2000
A closely divided U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) lacks the power to regulate tobacco products, handing President Clinton a stinging setback in the effort to curb youth smoking.

India: Clinton's Corporate Entourage
by Amit SrivastavaSpecial to CorpWatch
March 20th, 2000
Violence in Kashmir and nuclear proliferation are dominating the mainstream headlines on President Clinton's trip to South Asia. And while security issues are clearly on the agenda in Clinton's meetings with Indian Prime Minister Atal Behari Vajpayee, the press is ignoring an equally significant part of the trip: trade.

CARIBBEAN: Banana Producers Fear Falling Victim to US-EU Trade War
by Brian KenetyInter Press Service
March 16th, 2000
A group of Caribbean banana-producing states fear that a prolonged lull in negotiations between the European Union (EU) and the United States over the EU's banana import regime could work against them.

USA: General Motors Quits Global Warming Lobby Group
by David GoodmanAssociated Press
March 15th, 2000
Environmentalists are claiming victory following General Motors Corp.'s decision to quit a lobbying group that has led the opposition to a 1997 global warming treaty reached in Kyoto, Japan.

Mexico: First Census of Street Working Children
Child Labour News Service
March 15th, 2000
Alejandro and Adrian are two of 14,322 children who work illegally on the streets of this city of 20 million people, according to the first survey Mexico City has conducted on the trend. Mexican law prohibits children younger than 14 from working. According to Isabel Molina, director of the federal System for the Whole Development of the Family, officials completed the study, supported by UNICEF, in order to draft policies to resolve the problem.

Mozambique: Leaders Call For Debt Cancellation
Panafrican News Agency
March 15th, 2000
Leaders of the Southern Africa Development Community Tuesday called on the international community to cancel all foreign debts owed by Mozambique.

Netherlands: Greenpeace Buys Shell Stock
Associated Press
March 14th, 2000
The Amsterdam-based environmentalist group announced the purchase of $240,000 worth of Royal Dutch/Shell Group equity to try to pressure the Anglo-Dutch energy conglomerate to build a huge solar panel production plant.

USA: Racial Wealth Gap Remains
by Yochi J. DreazenThe Wall Street Journal
March 14th, 2000
The booming economy has done much to boost the fortunes of many long-disadvantaged Americans. But the gap in well-being between whites and nonwhites didn't budge over the 1990s and remains huge, especially when measured by wealth.

USA: Wolfensohn Responds - Limiting the World Bank
by James D. WolfensohnWashington Post
March 13th, 2000
During the past few days a good deal of coverage has been focused on the Meltzer Commission Report on the International Financial Institutions, and what it might mean for the World Bank. Let me take this opportunity to lay out some real concerns that we at the bank have, and also to set the record straight.

Malaysia: Consumer Groups Press for Labelling of GE Food
by Anil NettoInter Press Service
March 13th, 2000
Buoyed by a string of recent campaign successes, consumer groups around the world are now demanding mandatory labelling of genetically modified (GM)food as they mark World Consumer Rights Day on Mar 15, reflecting growing concern about the unregulated production and trade of GM food crops.

USA: 175 Arrested at Hotel Protest Against Youth Crime Initiative
by Justino AguilaSan Francisco Examiner
March 9th, 2000
More than 175 noisy but nonviolent protesters, outraged by the passage of Proposition 21 on Tuesday, were hauled away by police after taking over the lobby of the Hilton hotel and refusing to leave.

US: Anti-Sweatshop Student Sit-Ins Continue
UNITE Stop Sweatshop News
March 9th, 2000
As students celebrated anti-sweatshop victories at Wisconsin, Indiana, and other schools, sit-ins began at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore and Macalester College in Minneapolis.

Europe: Protests Against GE Foods Spread Across Continent
Environment News Service
March 8th, 2000
In time for the spring planting season, the pressure group Friends of the Earth Europe is launching its biggest ever campaign on foods and crops made from genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in 22 countries across Europe.

USA: Between Revolution and Reform - The Meltzer Commission's Vision
by Martin WolfFinancial Times
March 8th, 2000
The ''report of the international financial institution advisory commission'' sounds so innocuous. It is not. In the current US debate, it will be explosive. The question is whether it will end with pure destruction or efficient replacements for the International Monetary Fund, World Bank and regional development banks of today.

Ecuador: Unions Plan Big Protest
March 7th, 2000
Ecuador's largest union confederation said Tuesday it would stage protests in the capital Quito on March 21 against government plans to adopt the U.S. dollar as official currency. The Coordinator of Social Movements, which groups agricultural, oil, power, telecom and other unions, said it would bring Quito to a halt to protest Ecuador's ''dollarization'', which was approved by Congress last week.

USA: Union Carbide CEO Fugitive in Bhopal Suit
by Chris HedgesNew York Times
March 7th, 2000
Warren M. Anderson, chairman of the Union Carbide Corporation during the 1984 chemical disaster at Bhopal, India, has apparently gone into hiding to avoid a summons to appear in a Manhattan federal court as part of civil proceedings against him and the company, say lawyers who have hired a private investigator to locate Mr. Anderson.

ZAMBIA: Environmentalists Caution New Mine Investors
The Times of Zambia (Lusaka)
March 6th, 2000
A non-governmental organisation has cautioned the new mine investors not to willfully pollute the environment despite a bill which indemnifies them from litigation against environmental degradation. Citizens for a better environment, a Kitwe based NGO, warned that should the new mines violate the rights of the people to a clean environment, they would face the wrath of the public.

Mexico: Activists Beat Mitsubishi
UN Wire
March 3rd, 2000
Bowing to pressure from environmental groups, Japanese industrial giant Mitsubishi and the Mexican government announced yesterday they are scrapping plans to build a salt works near a gray whale breeding area in Baja California (New York Times).

Scotland: Consumer Advocates Throw Down Gauntlet on GE Foods
Agence France Presse
February 29th, 2000
Genetically-modified foods face a consumer revolt if biotech corporations, scientists and policy-makers fail to overhaul the way they vet the safety of these novel products, consumer watchdogs said Tuesday.

USA: Boeing Walkout Reverberates in White Collar World
by Dean PatonChristian Science Monitor
February 24th, 2000
In two weeks, this band of Boeing engineers and technicians has metamorphosed from little more than a voluntary employees club to perhaps the most potent symbol of white-collar solidarity in America today.

JAPAN: People Power Overcomes Nuclear Power
by Jonathan WattsThe Guardian (UK)
February 23rd, 2000
Japan's nuclear power industry suffered a historic defeat yesterday when one of the country's biggest utilities was forced to scrap plans for a power plant that it has been trying to build for 37 years.

USA: Big Tobacco Off the Ropes?
by Russell Mokhiber and Robert WeissmanFocus on the Corporation
February 23rd, 2000
Whether Big Tobacco succeeds will depend in significant part on whether tobacco control groups and their many new allies of various stripes refuse to succumb to Big Tobacco's combined intimidation and charm offensive.

Mozambique: Country Staggers Under Debt Despite Devastating Floods
Financial Times
February 23rd, 2000
Mozambique, hit by the worst floods in 30 years, is having to pay $1.4 million a week in debt service, the Jubilee 2000 Coalition revealed in a statement to the press on 23rd February.

US: Chicago Sweatshop Plan May Be Model
by Martha IrvineAssociated Press
February 19th, 2000
They sound like stories from another time. But a survey of the working poor in Chicago and surrounding suburbs has found otherwise. More than a third of the 800 workers questioned many of them immigrants described conditions in factories, restaurants and other workplaces that the federal government would deem ''sweatshops.''

USA: Farmers Desert Genetically Modified Crops
by Julian BorgerThe Guardian (UK)
February 17th, 2000
US farmers have just finished buying seed for the coming growing season, and early studies suggest that a significant proportion are abandoning GM. A market survey reveals that US farmers plan to plant 16% less genetically modified (GM) corn than they did last year.

USA: Clinton Backs Multinationals Against States in Challenge to Burma Sanctions
by Jim LobeInter Press Service
February 16th, 2000
In a major boost for the forces of economic globalisation, US President Bill Clinton has decided to back multinational corporations in a key court challenge to a Massachusetts law designed to promote democracy in Burma.

US: Vermiculite Products Could Expose Consumers to Asbestos
by Cat LazaroffEnvironment News Service
February 15th, 2000
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is investigating whether products made from vermiculite could expose consumers to asbestos. Preliminary test results on common household products indicate that a particularly lethal form of asbestos fibers contaminates some attic insulation, but researchers do not yet know whether normal use of these products could endanger consumers.

Thailand: Outgoing IMF Chief Hit With Pie
Associated Press
February 13th, 2000
Thailand -- The outgoing chief of the International Monetary Fund got a rude retirement present Sunday when an American anti-free trade activist penetrated security at a trade conference and hit him with a pie in the face.

Brazil: IMF -- Shut Up or Get Out
Associated Press
February 12th, 2000
The International Monetary Fund has retracted criticism of Brazil's anti-poverty plan in the wake of national indignation and calls for IMF representative Lorenzo Perez to be kicked out of the country.

USA: People of Color Battle Toxics in Communities
by Cat LazaroffEnvironment News Service
February 11th, 2000
Ten African American children are visiting Washington, D.C. this week, but they did not come to see the usual tourist attractions. They are here to illustrate the dangerous legacy of hazardous wastes, contaminated manufacturing sites, and polluting industries, placed predominantly in poor, non-White communities.

World: Who is Paying the Cost of Our Fuel Bills?
by George MonbiotThe Guardian Weekly
February 10th, 2000
The effects of global warming are cruelly ironic: the impact of fossil-fuel consumption will be most severe in regions where the least fuel has been consumed. Sub-Saharan Africa is becoming drier: in East Africa droughts of the kind that used to strike every 40 years are arriving every four or five.

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