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Netherlands: Climate Talks are Dead, Now It's Time for Action
by Mark LynasOneworld Opinion
November 25th, 2000
The final plenary session of the Sixth Conference of the Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change gave few clues as to the reasons for this failure. Desperate to salvage some credibility from the ashes of this long and complex process, delegates queued up to deliver heart-felt statements of regret and willingness to resume in the near future.

USA: Outlook Bleak for Environment Cleanup
by Danielle KnightInter Press Service
November 23rd, 2000
If deterioration of the global environment over the past several decades is any guide, the coming century does not hold out much promise for reversing these trends, many environmentalists are warning as the millennium comes to a close.

Netherlands: Anger at US Boils Over at Climate Talks
by Robin PomeroyReuters
November 22nd, 2000
Scuffles broke out as over 20 British protesters burst into a room where a group of ministers were negotiating and shouted slogans demanding that the United States, the world's biggest producer of heat-trapping gases, do more to stop climate change.

India: ''Green Revolution'' Bad News for Poor Laborers
by Bharat DograInter Press Service
November 22nd, 2000
Sikri Kalan is a ''Green Revolution'' village. The term is derived from India's three-decade-old farming revolution, which was ushered in by high-yielding wheat crops that helped make the country self-reliant in food.

USA: United Farm Workers Call Off Grape Boycott
by Brian MelleyAssociated Press
November 21st, 2000
In time for Thanksgiving, the United Farm Workers union ended its 16-year ''Wrath of Grapes'' boycott Tuesday -- halting the longest of its three California table grape boycotts.

Colombia: Monsanto, US War on Drugs Poison Environment
by Brian HansenEnvironment News Service
November 20th, 2000
The aerial fumigation program that has grown out of the U.S. government's so-called ''war on drugs'' is endangering the fragile ecosystems and indigenous cultures of Colombia's Amazon Basin, a coalition of groups warned today at a news conference on Capitol Hill.

FRANCE: Yahoo! Ordered To Block Users
by Pierre-Antoine SouchardAssociated Press
November 20th, 2000
In a landmark ruling, a French court on Monday ordered Yahoo! to block French Web users from its auction sites selling Nazi memorabilia.

Netherlands: Oil Companies Wreak Destruction from Arctic Circle to Nigeria
by Mark LynasOneworld.net
November 19th, 2000
As delegates caught up on their sleep during the official day of rest yesterday, speakers were lining up at the 'Climate Justice Summit' to tell their stories of devastation wrought by oil companies. One of the main themes of the conference was an emphasis on the leading role being taken by local communities trying to stop the climate change problem at source by confronting oil and mining companies.

BRUNEI: Clinton Urges Economic Globalization
by Dirk BeveridgeAssociated Press
November 15th, 2000
President Clinton sought to nudge economic globalization forward Wednesday by calling for new world trade negotiations by 2001 -- a deadline developing nations are resisting.

Netherlands: US Position Threatens to Derail Climate Negotiations
by Cat LazaroffEnvironment News Service
November 14th, 2000
The United States has taken a tough stance regarding the compromises it is willing to make in this week's international climate change negotiations in the Netherlands. The U.S. position threatens to alienate the support of some environmental groups, which could be crucial to the successful implementation of the agreement.

USA: Cheney Made Millions Off Oil Deals with Hussein
by Martin A. LeeSan Francisco Bay Guardian
November 13th, 2000
During former defense secretary Richard Cheney's five-year tenure as chief executive of Halliburton, Inc., his oil services firm raked in big bucks from dubious commercial dealings with Iraq. Cheney left Halliburton with a $34 million retirement package last July when he became the GOP's vice-presidential candidate

India: Dam Protesters Confront World Bank Chief
by Frederick NoronhaEnvironment News Service
November 13th, 2000
Over a thousand environmental protesters today stormed police barricades in New Delhi, and marched up to the offices of the World Bank, demanding they be allowed to meet with visiting Bank president James Wolfensohn.

USA: Gore Campaign Challenges Florida Vote
by Daniel J. WakinReuters
November 9th, 2000
Vice President Al Gore's campaign announced an all-out effort today to contest Florida's presidential election result, demanding a recount by hand in four counties and promising to support legal challenges as the dispute grew increasingly bitter.

USA: Ralph Nader's No Pat Robertson
by Gregory PalastLeft Labour Review (Britain)
November 8th, 2000
I cast the vote that dare not speak its name: so shoot me, I voted Nader. But my shame is not in electing George W. I'm more nagged by an unflattering parallel between Nader's campaign and the 1988 run for President by that Bible-banging, sticky-fingered televangelist Pat Robertson.

USA: Green Voters Create American Presidential Cliffhanger
Environment News Service
November 8th, 2000
It all comes down to Florida. Despite winning the popular vote by an estimated 220,000 votes, Democratic candidate Vice President Al Gore may yet lose the presidential election, based on a handful of absentee ballots in Florida and the turnout of Green Party voters.

USA: Europeans Sue Big Tobacco
by Suzanne DaleyNew York Times
November 7th, 2000
The European Commission said today that it had filed a civil lawsuit in the United States against the Philip Morris Company and the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company seeking damages for what it called their involvement with organized crime in smuggling cigarettes into Europe.

USA: World Bank and IMF Have Stake in Elections
by Gumisai MutumeInter Press Service
November 5th, 2000
Bush, the Republican candidate for the Nov. 7 US presidential elections, is more leery of the current role of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank, analysts say.

World: Climate Talks Hinge on US Elections
by Marcela ValenteInter Press Service
November 3rd, 2000
The United States has been the key actor in preparatory negotiations leading up to the climate change conference to be held at The Hague this month, leading many to fear that US presidential elections Nov 7 will mean the enactment of the conference's resolutions will be put on hold.

USA: Ex-EPA Head Reilly Accuses Gore of Sell-Out
U.S. Newswire
November 2nd, 2000
Former EPA Administrator William Reilly testified on Tuesday that a top Gore aide encouraged him to issue a trial-burn permit for the WTI incinerator located in East Liverpool -- despite Gore's promises not to before the people of the Ohio River Valley.

World: Climate Change Conference or Business Meeting?
by Marcela ValenteInter Press Service
November 1st, 2000
Delegates from 175 countries are to meet at The Hague in mid-November to hammer out details for satisfying commitments made for curbing emissions of climate-changing greenhouse gases, but environmental activists warn that the discussions leading up to the conference look more like business deals.

USA: Lesser-Evil Voting Is a Hard Sell to His Sons
by Robert ScheerLos Angeles Times
October 31st, 2000
Being a columnist is hardly the influential position it's cracked up to be. For weeks I've been trying to convince Ralph Nader voters that they have an obligation to vote for Al Gore or risk right-wing domination of government's three branches. For me, it's a no-brainer since George W. Bush has named Clarence Thomas and Antonin Scalia as his role models for the three to five Supreme Court appointments he's likely to make.

UN: Report Reveals Dire Global Warming Projections
UN Wire
October 31st, 2000
A new report by the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reveals new evidence that man-made pollution has ''contributed substantially'' to global warming and that the planet is likely to get hotter than previously predicted, the Associated Press reports. The findings are expected to carry great weight in the climate debate over the next decade.

Pacific Islands: Report Says Pacific Reefs, Economies Threatened
UN Wire
October 31st, 2000
Pacific island nations face severe economic decline due to the effects of global warming on coral reefs, which currently represent a key source of income, according to a Greenpeace report released Friday.

UK: Earth Will Get Hotter than Expected
by John VidalThe Guardian Unlimited
October 30th, 2000
Leading climate scientists now agree that human pollution, mainly from fossil fuels, has added substantially to global warming in the past 50 years and that the Earth is likely to get far hotter than previously predicted, with immense consequences for people and wildlife.

India: Anti-Narmada Dam Campaigner on Hunger Strike
by Ranjit DevrajInter Presss Service
October 27th, 2000
Famed anti-Narmada dam campaigner, Medha Patkar, Friday entered the third day of her hunger protest, in the city of Bhopal, the capital of central Madhya Pradesh state. The state is the home of most of the quarter million, mainly indigenous people to be displaced by the four billion-U.S. dollar Sardar Sarovar dam.

World: Enviromentalists Call for Mining Standards
by Danielle KnightInter Press Service
October 25th, 2000
Following January's cyanide spill in Romania and new reports on mining disasters from China, environmentalists are calling for governments worldwide to adopt international mining standards.

USA: World Bank Lambasted for Ignoring Racial Dimension of Poverty
by Gumisai MutumeInter Press Service
October 25th, 2000
Race has become such a scary word to the World Bank that its officials found themselves referring to it as the 'R-word' while responding to charges that the institution had skirted race in its recent World Development Report.

Africa: WHO Enlists Politicians in Anti-Tobacco War
by Judith AchiengInter Press Service
October 25th, 2000
The World Health Organisation (WHO), is targeting African policy-makers, to counter the intensified marketing campaigns by tobacco multinationals in the continent.

South Africa: Cholera Could be Linked to Water Fees
SAPA and Woza News
October 24th, 2000
The cholera outbreak in KwaZulu-Natal, which has claimed 31 lives, could be related to the government's growth, employment and redistribution (GEAR) strategy, the National Health and Allied Workers' Union (Nehawu) said on Monday.

World: WHO Starts Talks On Tobacco Treaty
UN Wire
October 18th, 2000
Government representatives began discussions Monday in Geneva on a proposed anti-tobacco treaty for preventing smoking-related deaths, which are predicted to reach 10 million annually by 2030.

USA: Corporate Giants Begin Greenhouse Gas Trading Program
by Danielle KnightInter Press Service
October 18th, 2000
Seven corporations, including several of the world's largest multinational companies, have joined with an environmental group in seeking ways to trade emission permits to reduce their production of heat-trapping greenhouse gas emissions. But critics say the partnership is just more of the same hot air from the world's fossil fuel industry.

USA: Corporate Giants Begin Greenhouse Gas Trading
Inter Press Service
October 18th, 2000
Seven corporations, including some of the world's largest multinational companies, have joined with an environmental group in seeking ways to trade emission permits to reduce their production of heat-trapping greenhouse gas emissions.

Europe: Biotechnology Mega-Merger
by Jaya RamachandranInter Press Service
October 17th, 2000
The merger of two biotech corporations - the Swiss Novartis and British AstraZeneca - to create the world's biggest agribusiness is alarming some of Europe's largest development agencies.

USA: Chevron-Texaco Merger Criticized
Institute for Public Accuracy
October 16th, 2000
Chevron has just agreed to acquire Texaco for $36 billion. This follows the BP-Amoco and Exxon-Mobil mergers. The following analysts are available for comments.

Venezuela: Oil Workers Strike
by Fabiola SanchezAssociated Press
October 11th, 2000
As tensions mounted between President Hugo Chavez and opposition labor groups, tens of thousands of oil workers went on strike Wednesday to demand higher wages.

UK: Aventis Admits Growing Unauthorized GM Seed
Environment News Service
October 10th, 2000
Biotechnology company Aventis admitted Monday that it had grown genetically modified sugar beet without permission at two trial sites in the United Kingdom.

Czech Republic: A World Bank Economist's Odyssey in Kafka's Prague
by Antonio AndradeBusiness World (The Philippines)
October 9th, 2000
Columnist Walden Bello met an old contact from the World Bank during the World Bank-IMF joint annual meetings in Prague, Czech Republic, on Sept. 26 to 28. The following is his account of the events that unfolded around him during that fateful conference. Antonio Andrade is not his real name.

Kenya: Civil Servants Face Job Loss Due to IMF Policies
by John KamauGemini News Service
October 6th, 2000
Betty Kavila is one of the 25,783 civil servants who are to be retrenched in October as a condition set by the World Bank and International Monetary Fund to resume lending to Kenya.

USA: Nader Challenges Presidential Debate Funding
by Leslie GevirtzReuters
October 6th, 2000
Lawyers for Green Party presidential candidate Ralph Nader sought on Thursday to toss out corporate financing of the presidential debates, arguing before a federal appeals panel that such funding was illegal.

USA: Government Ties Helped Cheney and Halliburton Make Millions
by John RegaBloomberg News
October 6th, 2000
While the comment came in a light-hearted exchange with his Democratic opponent Joe Lieberman, Cheney's reply left out how closely Dallas-based Halliburton's fortunes are linked to the U.S. government. The world's largest oil services firm is a leading U.S. defense contractor and has benefited from financial guarantees granted by U.S. agencies that promote exports.

World: Environment Ministers Plan for Rio+10
by Susana Guzmn OrtegaEnvironment News Service
October 5th, 2000
The ministers are getting ready for Rio+10, a global meeting of world leaders 10 years after the historic 1992 United Nations Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Rio+10 is expected to build on Agenda 21, the plan of work agreed upon at the Earth Summit to conserve the environment.

US: Computers Bad for Kids
by Russell Mokhiber and Robert WeissmanFocus on the Corporation
October 5th, 2000
Last month, the www.allianceforchildhood.net Alliance for Childhood a group of more than 75 educators, child-development and health authorities called for a time-out from the overwhelming pressure on educators and parents to computerize childhood.

USA: Nader Campaign Draws Big Crowds
by Damian WhitworthTimes of London
October 3rd, 2000
If the race for the White House was won by whoever drew the biggest crowd there would be no contest. The next president would be a gaunt man in a crumpled suit who travels on discounted senior citizen's tickets and delivers long, rambling speeches. He is Ralph Nader, the consumer advocate turned Green Party presidential candidate.

Canada: Arctic Pollution Linked to Industrial Plants and Incinerators
by Danielle KnightInter Press Service
October 3rd, 2000
Toxic pollution that has mysteriously entered Canada's pristine Arctic region has now been linked to air emissions from specific municipal waste incinerators, cement kilns and industrial plants in the United States, Canada and Mexico, according to a new study released Tuesday.

Ecuador: Farmers Accuse Logging Firm of Harassment
by Kintto LucasInter Press Service
October 2nd, 2000
The logging firm Botrosa, one of whose partners is Ecuador's Trade Minister Roberto Pea Durini, has been charged in court for harassing peasant farmers and environmentalists in the northwestern province of Esmeraldas, near the Colombian border.

USA: Koch Industries Indicted for Air, Hazardous Waste Violations
by Brian HansenEnvironment News Service
October 2nd, 2000
A Texas based oil conglomerate and four of its employees were indicted last week on 97 counts of violating federal clean air and hazardous waste laws. The charges come less than one year after the company was slapped with the largest civil penalty ever levied under federal environmental statutes.

US: Roundup of Student Activism Against Sweatshops
by Keith MeattoMother Jones
October 1st, 2000
This year's cause celebre was the campaign to end the use of sweatshop labor by the $2.5-billion collegiate apparel industry. Undergraduates nationwide demanded their colleges quit the Fair Labor Association (FLA) -- an industry-backed watchdog that opponents liken to a fox guarding the hen house -- and join the Worker Rights Consortium. Founded by students, academics, and labor unions last October, the WRC promises strict workplace oversight, free from industry influence.

Europe: Biotech Congress Cancelled
Corporate Europe Observer
October 1st, 2000
EuropaBio, the European biotech lobby group, has recently suffered a major blow when it had to cancel its annual congress. The Fourth Annual European Biotechnology Congress was scheduled to take place in Edinburgh, Scotland on October 9-13. According to the Dutch daily newspaper, De Volkskrant, EuropaBio, ''cannot deny that the conference was cancelled due to the fierce critique of genetic engineering in the UK and the resulting lack of sponsors.''

Turkey: Swedish Firm Pulls Out of World Bank Dam Project
Environment News Service
September 29th, 2000
One of the leading partners in a controversial hydroelectric dam project in southeastern Turkey pulled out of the scheme this week.

US: Report Says Global Accounting Firm Overlooks Factory Abuses
by Steven GreenhouseThe New York Times
September 28th, 2000
In a rare inside look at the auditing firms that inspect overseas factories to see whether they are sweatshops, an M.I.T. professor contends that the world's largest factory-monitoring firm does a shoddy job and overlooks many safety and wage violations.

Nicaragua: Banana Workers May Sue International Firms
Reuters
September 27th, 2000
DBCP, or dibromochloropropane, is one of the pesticides used on Nicaragua's banana plantations in the 1970s. Workers say it has affected 22,000 people, directly or indirectly, and that DBCP-related illnesses have already killed at least 83 of their comrades.

USA: Anti-Tobacco Activists Add Video to Arsenal Before Framework Talks
by Jim LobeInter Press Service
September 27th, 2000
Anti-tobacco activists have added a new weapon to their arsenal in advance of next month's negotiations in Geneva for a global Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC).

Czech Republic: Protesters March on IMF Meeting
Reuters
September 26th, 2000
Some 5,000 demonstrators marched towards Prague's Congress Centre on Tuesday in a bid to besiege the annual International Monetary Fund and World Bank meetings.

Czech Republic: Festive Demonstrations in Prague
Agence France Presse
September 26th, 2000
The front line was a scene of confrontation, with riot police three-deep stopping protesters, occasionally by leaking tear gas in their direction and by truncheon blows, from advancing toward the Congress Center on the other side of the several-hundred-meter(-yard)-long bridge, where delegates from the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund are holding their annual plenary meeting.

USA: Protesters Disrupt Morning Rush in Washington DC
Washington Post
September 26th, 2000
Police arrested 32 protesters who sat down and linked arms to obstruct the 1900 block of L Street NW during rush hour this morning. The demonstrators were part of a group of 200 who marched and chanted for "global justice" and for the rights of local parking attendants to join a union.

JAPAN: Snow Brand Inc. Merges with Nestle After Food-Poisoning Outbreak
Agence France Presse
September 26th, 2000
The dairy company at the centre of Japan's biggest ever food-poisoning outbreak said Tuesday it was tying up with Swiss giant Nestle, as it unveiled big job cuts in a bid to repair the financial damage.

Czech Republic: Protestors Demand More Action on Debt Relief
Reuters
September 25th, 2000
International debt relief campaigners took to the streets of Prague on Sunday angrily demanding that the world's creditors finally make good on promises to write off large swathes of poor countries' debts.

India: Farmers Urge 10-Year Moratorium on GM Agriculture
Agence France Presse
September 25th, 2000
A tribunal formed by more than 25 farmers groups in India called Monday for a 10-year national moratorium on the commercial use of genetic engineering in agriculture.

Czech Republic: Havel Brings IMF/WB Face-To-Face with Critics
Reuters
September 24th, 2000
Czech President Vaclav Havel brought leaders of the IMF and the World Bank together with their critics on Saturday in the hope dialogue would replace demonstrations as the keynote of this week's gatherings.

WORLD: NGOs Tell World Bank "Don't Hijack the Internet"
by Gumisai MutumeInter Press Service
September 21st, 2000
Non-governmental organisations and academics are alarmed over the Global Gateway, a portal website project which the Bank says will be the ''the premier web entry point for information about poverty and sustainable development'' but which the NGOs say is flawed and non-participatory.

USA: Shell to Face Lawsuit for Saro-Wiwa Execution
by Karen McGregorThe Independent
September 19th, 2000
Allegations that the oil multinational Shell aided and abetted the torture and murder of Nigerian activists including the executed writer Ken Saro-Wiwa will be tested by a full jury trial in New York, after the oil company's attempts to have the case thrown out were rejected.

USA: Why I'm Skipping the Olympics
by Kaliya YoungSan Francisco Chronicle (Opinion)
September 17th, 2000
My perspective on the Games gradually shifted. I began to see that my sacrifices were going to be used by the Olympic Games and their sponsors for ends that conflicted with my fundamental values. My competitive performance would not just be a part of a world community gathering to compete in the spirit of fair play, good will and global unity, but rather it would be sold to the highest corporate bidder for their own commercial gain.

UN: G-77 Calls for Rules of Engagement for Corporate Partnerships
Panafrican News Agency
September 16th, 2000
In the second year of UN Secretary General, Kofi Annan's policy of UN engagement with the private sector, the Group of 77 Friday called for appropriate rules to guide such an engagement.

US: Sony Corporation Tracks Environmental Organizations
by Danielle KnightInter Press Service
September 15th, 2000
A leaked document written by Sony Corporation, obtained by IPS, outlines a presentation made in July to fellow electronics companies at a conference in Brussels illustrating the various activities of environmental groups. It names specific US activists who seek to regulate waste caused by the electronics industry.

USA: New Report Examines Commercialism in Schools
by Constance L. HaysNew York Times
September 14th, 2000
From exclusive soft-drink contracts to computers displaying continuous advertising, corporate marketing in public schools is rising sharply. But few states have laws in place to address the phenomenon, and most decisions on commercial arrangements in schools are made piecemeal by local officials, according to a report from the General Accounting Office scheduled to be released today.

AUSTRALIA: U.S. Soccer Players Confront Nike Protestors
Times of India
September 12th, 2000
This was Sunday, the day before the start of the three-day World Economic Forum in Melbourne, the same type of meeting that sparked riots in Seattle last year. The two players just happened to pass one of the demonstrations at a park.

US: Ford/Firestone = Homicide?
by Russell Mokhiber and Robert WeissmanFocus on Corporations
September 12th, 2000
Matthew Hendricks is one of more than 150 deaths around the world linked to Firestone tread separations. The families and friends of those killed in these accidents want to know -- what did Ford and Firestone know about these tires and when did they know it?

Australia: Anti-Globalization Protestors Claim Victory
Agence France Presse
September 11th, 2000
Anti-globalisation campaigners claimed victory Monday after blockading a major international economic conference in a pitched battle with police in which scores of people were hurt.

USA: Billion Dollar NAFTA Challenge to California MTBE Ban
by Cat LazaroffEnvironment News Service
September 11th, 2000
The Canadian challenger, Methanex Corporation, has argued that a plan to remove the toxic chemical MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether) from California's gasoline violates the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

UN: Protests at the Millennium Summit
by Jacki LydenNational Public Radio
September 9th, 2000
Improving health care and education, and ending poverty were some of the resolutions world leaders agreed upon at the United Nations Millennium Summit this week in New York. Participants also pledged to strengthen the UN's role in preventing international conflict.

UN: Don't Bother Looking to the World Body for Help
by Naomi KleinToronto Globe & Mail
September 6th, 2000
This meeting is hosted by the United Nations, which, by its mandate, places human and ecological needs ahead of the voracious demands of the market. Imperfect as the UN system may be, it is generally viewed by critics of globalization as a ray of moral hope on the international stage.

INDIA: 325,000 Telecom Workers Strike over Corporatization Plan
Agence France Presse
September 6th, 2000
Some 325,000 Indian state telecom workers began an indefinite strike Wednesday, to push for guarantees against layoffs and pension losses when their department becomes a corporation next month.

France: Fuel Prices Ignite Protests
Financial Times
September 6th, 2000
French riot police prevented farmers from blocking freight access to the Channel Tunnel as protests against petrol prices continued to escalate.

Czech Republic: Prague Prepares for Anti-Globalization Protests
UN Wire
September 5th, 2000
The International Monetary Fund and World Bank will hold their annual meeting in Prague next month, attracting nearly 18,000 officials, private bankers and journalists, as well as 20,000-40,000 protesters.

USA: Alternative Summit Meetings Examine Globalization
by Grant McCoolReuters
September 5th, 2000
Activists, businessmen and government leaders met on Tuesday in the shadow of the U.N. Millennium Summit, agonizing over the future of economic globalization following the disruption of the WTO in Seattle and how to narrow the widening gap between rich and poor.

CHINA: McDonald's Fires Underage Workers
Associated Press
September 4th, 2000
Scores of underage workers hired in a mainland China factory that makes toys for McDonald's were fired following recent media reports about the situation, a Hong Kong labor-monitoring group said Monday.

UN: Globalization Tops Agenda for World Leaders at Millenium Summit
by Barbara CrossetteNew York Times
September 3rd, 2000
The stormy battle over globalization that brought protests to the streets of Seattle and Washington moves this week to the heart of the world's only truly global organization, the United Nations.

USA: Ralph Nader's Racial Blindspot
by Vanessa DanielColorlines
September 1st, 2000
By contrast, Ralph Nader is actually addressing some of the big issues affecting people of color. In tackling thorny topics such as corporate globalization, environmental abuse and child poverty, Nader often speaks to problems that have their most devastating affects in communities of color.

UN: Making Peace with Power
by George MonbiotThe Guardian
August 31st, 2000
The United Nations Centre on Transnational Corporations, which tried to help weak nations to protect themselves from predatory companies, had recommended that businesses should be internationally regulated. The UN refused to circulate its suggestions.

MEXICO: Country Ordered to Pay US Company $17 Million for NAFTA Violations
by Danielle KnightInter Press Service
August 31st, 2000
An international trade tribunal based here has ruled that Mexico violated the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and ordered the government to pay 16.7 million dollars to a US company.

Mexico: Environmentalist Found Guilty, Rights Groups Protest
New York Times
August 29th, 2000
In closing a case that has led to outrage among environmental groups around the world, a district judge in the state of Guerrero found Rudolfo Montiel Flores guilty today of drugs and weapons crimes and sentenced him to nearly seven years in prison.

JAPAN: Police Raid Mitsubishi Motors
Business Recorder
August 28th, 2000
Japanese police investigators raided the offices of Mitsubishi Motors Corp on Sunday on suspicion of concealing customer complaints and recalls from government inspectors for decades, Kyodo news agency reported.

US: McDonald's Uses Sweatshop
Associated Press
August 27th, 2000
Snoopy, Winnie the Pooh and Hello Kitty toys sold with McDonald's meals in Hong Kong are made at a mainland Chinese sweatshop that illegally employs child laborers to package the toys, a newspaper reported Sunday.

USA: Behavior in Nazi Era Examined
Associated Press
August 27th, 2000
The country that would prefer to be known more for its World War II heroism will take its turn in examining how some in corporate America and official Washington also failed Hitler's victims.

USA: Chevron Will Pay $7 Million for Clean Air Violations
by Cat LazaroffEnvironment News Service
August 24th, 2000
Chevron USA, the second largest U.S. oil company, has agreed to pay a $6 million fine and spend $1 million on environmental improvements to settle a federal lawsuit over Clean Air Act violations at a California offshore oil terminal.

UK: GMO Crop Testing Approved
Environment News Service
August 24th, 2000
Unperturbed by threats of legal action from environmental groups, the UK's agriculture ministry announced Wednesday that it will allow genetically modified (GM) crop trials to go ahead this fall.

India: Outcry at Police Action Against Dam Protestors
by Danielle KnightInter Press Service
August 24th, 2000
Human rights and environmental groups are condemning state police in India for preventing about 500 people from attending a public hearing on a controversial dam planned for the Narmada river.

Germany: Farben to Create Slave Labor Fund
Associated Press
August 23rd, 2000
IG Farben, the German chemical company that made poison gas for Nazi death camps, will set up a compensation fund for Nazi-era slave laborers within weeks, an official in charge of liquidating the once-great firm said Wednesday.

Brazil: Grassroots Referendum on Foreign Debt
by Axel BuggeReuters
August 23rd, 2000
Worries by Brazil's government over plans by a grassroots movement to hold a plebiscite on the country's huge debt costs gathered steam this week as the vote aiming to force attention on deep social inequalities approached.

NICARAGUA: US Retailers Contract with Sweatshops
by Carrie AntlfingerAssociated Press
August 22nd, 2000
Gonzalez was one of two workers invited Monday to recount conditions at two Nicaraguan factories that human rights, religious and labor groups claim supply Kohl's Department Stores with cheap garments.

Canada: Sweet-Scented Pesticide 'Sugarcoats a Toxic Pill'
by Andrew DuffyOttawa Citizen
August 20th, 2000
An association that represents Ontario lawn-care companies is selling cherry and bubble-gum flavoured scents to mask the smell of toxic pesticides.

Bangladesh: Shell Oil Drilling Threatens Tiger Preserve
by Jonathan LeakeSunday Times of London
August 20th, 2000
SHELL, the Anglo-Dutch oil company, is planning to survey the world's biggest tiger reserve after company geologists pinpointed it as one of the richest potential sources of oil and gas on earth.

TURKEY: Dam Will Destroy Kurdish Culture, Say Critics
Bloomberg
August 16th, 2000
A Kurdish human rights lawyer is spearheading an international campaign to block the Turkish government's efforts to build a dam he says will dislodge thousands of Kurds and destroy archeological artifacts.

USA: Corporate Media Misses Protest Story, Focuses on Violence
by Tamara StrausAlterNet
August 16th, 2000
It was an odd fact of the demonstrations surrounding the Democratic Convention in Los Angeles that the only protests to get mass media coverage were those where cops moved in and arrested people.

USA: Los Angeles Police Defend Crackdown on Protest
by Arthur SpiegelmanReuters
August 15th, 2000
Civil liberties groups threatened to sue the Los Angeles Police Department Tuesday, saying it shot innocent people in the back with rubber bullets as they peacefully left a Democratic Convention protest, but the city's top cop said he felt good about police actions.

USA: Los Angeles Activists Target Corporate Greed
by Christine HanleyAssociated Press
August 14th, 2000
Activists organized protests against corporate greed, oil company abuses and the lack of campaign finance reform to mark Monday's opening of the Democratic National Convention.

USA: Oil Corporations Woo Democrats
Associated Press
August 14th, 2000
While Democrats will be partying all across Tinseltown this week, these events go far beyond typical convention-week soirees. Each is aimed at the Democrat who would take over a key committee if the party managed to regain control of Congress in the November elections.

USA: U'wa March Trashes Gore
by Tamara StrausAlterNet
August 14th, 2000
To put it mildly, the U'wa are a touchy issue for Gore. The presidential candidate owns between $500,000 and $1 million in Occidental stock and his father, Al Gore Sr., served as chair of the board for 28 years, earning an annual salary of $500,000. The elder Gore was such a close political ally of the company that Armand Hammer, Occidental's founder and CEO, liked to say that he had Gore ''in my back pocket.''

India: World Bank Admits Failure of Coal Project
UN Wire
August 14th, 2000
According to the report, thousands of villagers in eastern and central India received no compensation after state-owned Coal India used a $530 million loan from the World Bank in 1997 to raze their homes in a coal mine modernization scheme. Although resettling, compensating and retraining farmers as entrepreneurs was part of the loan deal, Coal India had no experience in these activities and was unable to carry them out.

SWITZERLAND: Report Calls WTO 'Nightmare'
by Robert EvansReuters
August 11th, 2000
A United Nations-appointed study team has labeled the World Trade Organization a ''nightmare'' for developing countries and suggested the body should be brought under the U.N.'s purview.

The United Nations Sits in Suspicious Company
by Joshua Karliner and Kenny BrunoInternational Herald Tribune
August 10th, 2000
At the UN meeting, the leaders of corporations well known for running sweatshops, engendering environmental disaster and colluding in human rights violations sat at the table with Mr. Annan. They agreed to adhere to and publicly promote the Global Compact's nine core principles of universally accepted labor, environmental and human rights values.

USA: Lieberman's Big Donations From Big Businesses
by Elizabeth ShogrenLos Angeles Times
August 9th, 2000
An analysis of campaign-finance records released yesterday by the nonpartisan Center for Responsive Politics also showed that Lieberman has received more contributions this election cycle from insurance companies than any other senator.

USA: Reform Party Suffers Raucous Split
by Megan GarveyLos Angeles Times
August 9th, 2000
A meeting of Reform Party leaders in Long Beach erupted in chaos Tuesday, with screaming, shoving matches, a walkout by loyalists to party founder Ross Perot and a declaration that social conservative Pat Buchanan is now guaranteed the fractured party's presidential nomination.

USA: BP's Arctic Oil Project Stalled as Greenpeace Occupies Barge
by Neville JuddEnvironment News Service
August 7th, 2000
The environmental group Greenpeace International says it took the action this morning because British Petroleum's (BP) Northstar Development will fuel global warming and open the Arctic to offshore oil expansion.

USA: Joe Lieberman, Bad For The Jews, Bad For The Country
by Michael LernerExcerpted from Belief.net
August 7th, 2000
Among the candidates considered by Al Gore for the vice-presidential nomination, Joseph Lieberman is likely to accelerate the process in which the two major parties seem to be merging into one pro-business, pro-wealthy, elitist, and morally tone-deaf governing force.

USA: Bush the Main Act for TV Convention
by Frazier MooreAssociated Press
August 4th, 2000
Humorist Bill Maher began ABC's ''Politically Incorrect'' Thursday with rousing words. ''We finally had the big moment tonight that America was waiting for at the Republican National Convention,'' he said. ''The end.''

USA: Novartis Phasing Out Genetically Engineered Foods
by Neville JuddEnvironment News Service
August 4th, 2000
Novartis, one of the world's leading producers of genetically engineered seeds, has been phasing out genetically engineered ingredients in its food products worldwide for over a year.

US: Lockheed Martin's Promotional Film
by Jacques PerettiGuardian (London)
August 3rd, 2000
The slick, multimillion dollar productions of Lockheed and Boeing are in a different class. After watching hours of these corporate arms videos, one is struck not by the weaponry or the technology but the absence of human beings. The few faces that do appear, fleetingly, are partially hidden behind visors and clad in fireproof space suits, pressing buttons. The complete invisibility of the victims of war that first became apparent to the world during the Gulf war has reached its logical conclusion in the arms video. The average 15-year-old boy would see more bloodshed playing Doom in his bedroom.

Germany: Biotech Foods ''Conquer'' Supermarkets
Environment News Service
August 2nd, 2000
A German government backed consumer foundation has reported that over one-third of food products it tested contained either genetically modified (GM) soya or maize (corn).

USA: Protests Rock GOP, End in 282 Arrests
by John NicholsThe Nation
August 1st, 2000
''Whose streets? Our streets!'' chanted thousands of activists as they poured into the downtown Philadelphia for what may well have been the most raucous day of demonstrations outside a national convention since Chicago in 1968.

USA: GOP's Empty Promises to People of Color
by Richard FellingerPhiladelphia Weekly
August 1st, 2000
This marks the second consecutive convention in which the GOP is trying to sell itself to minorities and progressive whites. Remember that patronizing ''big-tent'' rhetoric from San Diego four years ago?

CHINA: China WTO Deal Imminent
Associated Press
August 1st, 2000
Mexico expects to sign an agreement with China ''very soon'' on the communist nation's entry into the World Trade Organization, Mexico's foreign minister said Tuesday.

World: Cigarette Firms Tried to Foil WHO, Say Investigators
by Gordon FaircloughWall Street Journal
August 1st, 2000
World Health Organization investigators say Philip Morris Co. and other multinational cigarette makers worked for years to discredit the agency and thwart its efforts to curb smoking around the globe.

USA: Anti-Poverty Activists March in Philadelphia
by David MorganReuters
July 31st, 2000
Thousands of protesters, led by people in wheelchairs, marched on the Republican National Convention on Monday to demand economic rights for people oppressed by poverty and homelessness.

Czech Republic: IMF Prepares for Prague Demonstrations
Associated Press
July 31st, 2000
The director of the International Monetary Fund said Monday he is confident that authorities in Prague are ready to handle possible riots during the IMF and World Bank meeting that will be held in the Czech capital in September.

USA: Touring the Real Philly
by Jennifer BleyerAlterNet
July 30th, 2000
''There are 250,000 families living below the poverty line in Philadelphia, and 40,000 abandoned houses that the city has boarded up. That's an incredible disconnect that the Republicans won't be talking about this week!'' shouts activist Tamzin Cheshire.

Burma: Cheney, Milosevic and Premier Oil Do Business with Junta
The Guardian (London)
July 28th, 2000
What do Dick Cheney, Slobodan Milosevic and the British company Premier Oil have in common? Answer: they all firmly believe in doing business with Burma, home to perhaps the world's most oppressive regime.

USA: African-American Community Takes a Deeper Look at Ralph Nader
by Cedric MuhammadBlackElectorate.com
July 28th, 2000
The logic, according to Democrats and Gore supporters is that by voting for Ralph Nader, people are only taking votes away from Al Gore and helping Gov. Bush walk into the White House -- directly benefiting from Gore's loss of the traditional Democratic votes that Nader represents. But can any self-respecting Black honestly say that Blacks have benefited under Clinton-Gore -- enough to automatically extend their reign for another 4 years -- with no questions asked?

U.N. Signs Up with Big Business to Promote Values
by Richard RothCNN
July 27th, 2000
The corporations, which were welcomed to U.N. Headquarters Wednesday by Secretary-General Kofi Annan, are paying big money to be able to say they are supporting the missions of the U.N.

UN: Annan Says Only Open Markets Can Ease World Poverty
Reuters
July 26th, 2000
Open markets offer the only realistic hope for lifting billions of people in developing countries out of poverty while maintaining prosperity in the industrial world, U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan said Wednesday.

UN: Multinationals Sign Pact on Rights and Environment
by Joseph KahnNew York Times
July 26th, 2000
Some 50 multinationals joined 12 labor associations and watchdog groups to sign a ''global compact'' that commits them to support human rights, eliminate child labor, allow free trade unions and refrain from polluting the environment wherever they do business.

India: Government Under Fire for Allowing GE Cotton Trials
by Ranjit DevrajInter Press Service
July 26th, 2000
The Indian government's decision to allow field trials of the controversial genetically-engineered (GE) cotton has come under flak from farmers' rights activists who allege this would ruin thousands of tillers in the country.

USA: Bolivia Makes the Style Page; Anti-Corporate Protests Ignored
by Gregory PalastWashington Post
July 26th, 2000
In April, five people were shot dead in Bolivia, a military policeman was lynched and the president declared a state of siege following a general strike that shut down much of the nation. At the end of it all, for the first time in a decade anywhere in the world, American and British corporate giants, the targets of the protest, were booted out of the Andean nation, a stunning reversal of the march of globalization.

USA: Dick Cheney's Oil Connections
Drillbits and Tailings (Project Underground)
July 25th, 2000
Having ensured the continued flow of cheap oil from the Gulf by waging a war with Iraq, and after his boss, George Bush's ouster from office by Clinton in 1992, Dick Cheney turned his attention to the corporate world.

INDONESIA: International Union Steps into Sony Dispute
Jakarta Post
July 25th, 2000
An international union has stepped into the dispute surrounding the dismissal of 928 workers from PT Sony Electronics Indonesia.

USA: Former Monsanto Lobbyist Appointed to Represent Consumers on GE Food Issues
by Tom AbateSan Francisco Chronicle
July 24th, 2000
Leading consumer and environmental groups are fuming because the Clinton administration has appointed a former Monsanto Corp. lobbyist to represent U.S. consumers on a transatlantic committee set up to avoid a trade war over genetically engineered foods.

USA: Health Care Firms Spend Big to Head Off Reforms
by Jeff LeedsLos Angeles Times
July 23rd, 2000
With billions of dollars in profits on the line, the health care industry is waging the largest national advertising campaign ever conducted by a political special interest, with a price tag for the election cycle that could approach $90 million--more than either of the major presidential candidates is expected to spend.

SOUTH ASIA: Digital Divide Sharpens Rich-Poor Gap
by Ranjit DevrajInter Press Service
July 21st, 2000
South Asia has emerged as the most promising region for sourcing information technology (IT) expertise, but this is an achievement that is of use only to the rich nations, say critics.

USA: A Civics Lesson for Big Tobacco
by Russell Mokhiber and Robert WeissmanFocus on the Corporation
July 18th, 2000
The $145 billion punitive damage award against the tobacco industry in the Engle case in Florida should be celebrated as evidence of a civil justice system that works, proof of the value of juries and a major public health achievement.

EU: Ban on Controversial Pesticide Recommended
Environment News Service
July 18th, 2000
The controversial insecticide lindane could be subject to a partial ban by the Europe Union's 15 member countries within 18 months.

EU: Commission Bows to US Pressure on GMOs
Environment News Service
July 13th, 2000
The European Union is trying to regain the public's confidence in genetically modified organisms (GMOs) by strengthening the laws that govern their release onto the market.

South Africa: IMF Can Only Bring Misery
by Trevor Ngwane and George DorThe Sowetan
July 12th, 2000
Last Friday, Horst Koehler, newly-appointed head of the International Monetary Fund, received a hostile response from the anti-privatisation forum, Jubilee 2000, the campaign against neoliberalism and the South African Communist Party.

USA: Fronting for Big Coal
by Russell Mokhiber and Robert WeissmanFocus on the Corporation
July 11th, 2000
So, we're sitting in our office, and under the door comes a note advising us that there will be a press conference the next day where African-American and Hispanic groups will release a report showing how minority populations will suffer most if the United Nations Global Warming Treaty (Kyoto agreement) passes the U.S. Senate.

USA: Army of Protestors Prepare to Greet GOP
by Thomas GinsbergPhiladelphia Inquirer
July 9th, 2000
Three weeks before Republicans hold their national convention, it appears the number of protesters gathering in Philadelphia could rival the 30,000 delegates and party members attending the convention itself.

US: Info-Cleansing on the Web
by Marcia StepanekBusiness Week Online
July 7th, 2000
Beware the public relations person with a modem. Now corporate spinmeisters, too, can go online to track customers -- especially the disgruntled ones who vent their spleen in cyberspace.

Pakistan: Corporate Farms Worry Food Activists
by Muddassir RizviInter Press Service
July 7th, 2000
ISLAMABAD -- The Pakistani government is inviting foreign business into the country's farms, giving rise to fears that this will finish off millions of small tillers and reduce national food supply.

USA: World Bank Out of Chinese Resettlement Project
by Gumisai MutumeInter Press Service
July 7th, 2000
WASHINGTON -- The World Bank has caved in to pressure from one of the biggest anti-World Bank campaigns by non-governmental organisations forcing China to use its own funds to resettle farmers on Tibetan territory.

Brazil: Activists Outraged by Decision on GM Crops
by Mario OsavaInter Press Service
July 4th, 2000
RIO DE JANEIRO -- The Brazilian Consumers Defence Institute (IDEC) asked the courts to issue arrest warrants for the members of a government scientific commission that gave the go-ahead to imports of transgenic corn, on the argument that the decision was released in violation of the law.

USA: Time to Cap Big Oil's Profit Gusher
by Russell Mokhiber and Robert WeissmanFocus on the Corporation
July 3rd, 2000
The startling concentration of economic power that has resulted from the U.S. merger wave of the last several years is going to require new levels of government intervention in the marketplace.

USA: Oil Money Gushing into Bush Campaign
by H. Josef HebertAssociated Press
July 3rd, 2000
WASHINGTON -- While locked in a string of disputes with the Clinton administration, the oil industry has pumped more than $1.5 million into George W. Bush's campaign. Oil companies will be seeking Bush's help on a range of issues, should he be elected president.

USA: Spying for Free Trade
by Duncan Campbell and Paul LashmarThe Independent (UK)
July 2nd, 2000
It is the new Cold War. The United States intelligence agencies, facing downsizing after the fall of the Berlin wall, have found themselves a new role spying on foreign firms to help American business in global markets.

FRANCE: José Bové a 'French Gandhi'?
by Charles BremnerTimes of London
July 1st, 2000
The anti-capitalist campaigner José Bové compared himself to Gandhi when he went on trial yesterday for demolishing a McDonald's restaurant in a southern French market town.

UK: Corporate Control of the Genome Only the Beginning
by George MonbiotThe Guardian (UK)
June 29th, 2000
Nearly everyone debating the mapping of the human genome now agrees on one thing: that the identification of our genes invokes an unprecedented danger, as it might assist a handful of companies to seize something which belongs to all of us. I wish this were true.

Nigeria: Court Fines Shell $40 Million for 1970 Spill
Environment News Service
June 26th, 2000
PORT HARCOURT, Nigeria -- A Rivers State High Court in Port Harcourt has ordered Royal Dutch/Shell to pay US$40 million in compensation for an oil spill which happened in 1970 in Ogoniland.

South Africa: AIDS Protestors Picket Pfizer
Associated Press
June 26th, 2000
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa About 100 picketers demonstrated Monday outside the offices of the Pfizer drug company, saying its offer of free treatment for an AIDS-related brain infection was insufficient.

UN: NGOs to Voice Concerns at Development Summit
Agence France Presse
June 22nd, 2000
GENEVA -- Nearly 100 Non-Governmental Organisations (NGO) are gathering here to make their concerns and criticisms heard ahead of a United Nations summit starting Monday to assess global social development.

USA: Environmentalists Question Uganda Dam Project
by Danielle KnightInter Press Service
June 22nd, 2000
WASHINGTON -- World Bank funding should not go toward building a large hydroelectric dam in Uganda when smaller scale renewable energy, like wind and solar, would more likely benefit the East African nation's rural poor, according to environmental groups here.

USA: City Sues Big Oil for Millions Over Polluted Drinking Water
by Timna TannersReuters
June 21st, 2000
SANTA MONICA -- The California beach city of Santa Monica is suing 18 oil companies for damages that could exceed $200 million, claiming that the firms polluted drinking water wells with the possibly cancer-causing gasoline additive MTBE.

Canada: Farmer v. Monsanto
by Fred BridglandEnvironment News Service
June 19th, 2000
Saskatchewan, Canada -- On the Great Plains of Canada, farmer Percy Schmeiser has engaged in a David v. Goliath battle which could save farmers and consumers around the world from a genetically modified food nightmare beyond anything they have experienced so far.

Canada: Raffi Says No to Ads for Kids
by Raffi CavoukianToronto Globe & Mail
June 19th, 2000
Throughout my 20-plus years of making music for children, the core value at the heart of my work has been respect for the young child as a whole person. I have not accepted any offers to do commercial endorsements because I believe it's wrong to use one's popularity to sell products to a vulnerable audience.

PERU: Mercury from Gold Mine Dumped in Transit
Environment News Service
June 16th, 2000
Eight people have been hospitalized including a woman in critical condition following a mercury spill near the Minera Yanacocha mine, 600 kilometers (375 miles) north of Lima, Peru.

EU: Anti-Sweatshop Campaign Targets Adidas
by Peter DhondtInter Press Service
June 9th, 2000
Anti-sweatshop pressure groups are protesting against sporting goods manufacturer, Adidas, being one of the major sponsors of Euro 2000, the European Football Championship that kicks off here Saturday.

USA: ExxonMobil Shareholders Use Stock to Push Change
by Jonathan FoxDallas Observer
June 8th, 2000
As with other behemoth multinational companies, Irving-based ExxonMobil's annual meeting is strictly a formality. Most of the crowd that packed the Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center in downtown Dallas to vote on shareholder resolutions last week were retirees who own relatively small amounts of company stock.

World: General Electric's Global Assault
by Russell Mokhiber and Robert WeissmanMother Jones
May 26th, 2000
While the 20-reign of General Electric's CEO has been a golden era for shareholders - the company's stock value has risen three time more than the Dow Jones average, leading Forbes magazine to name Welch the "Most Admired CEO of the Century" - it has been a disaster for employees.

Corn Growers Submit Recommendations to USDA on Agricultural Biotechnology
News and Views (American Corn Growers Association)
May 8th, 2000
The American Corn Growers Association (ACGA) has submitted comments to the United States Department of Agriculture's Advisory Committee on Agricultural Biotechnology. These comments include sixteen (16) recommendations that will protect agricultural producers in this whole debate over genetically modified (GMO) crops.

USA: Earth Day 2000 Targets Global Warming, Clean Energy
Inter Press Service
April 20th, 2000
In Earth Day 2000 celebrations around the globe, environmentalists plan to highlight the culprits of global warming and the solutions: renewable energy, including wind and solar.

AFRICA: Illegal Diamond Trade Funds War in Sierra Leone
UMCOR
April 19th, 2000
Peace cannot be sustained in Sierra Leone until controls are imposed on the illegal selling of diamonds used to finance its civil war, according to a recent study.

USA: Activists Target IMF Meeting
by John MadeleyThe Observer (London)
April 9th, 2000
Their target in Washington is the spring meetings of the Bank and International Monetary Fund, which begin next Sunday. The protest campaign against the sister institutions begins tomorrow with the launch an international campaign to persuade corporate investors not to buy World Bank bonds.

MEXICO: Environmental Prize Awarded Early to Jailed Farmer-Ecologist
Environment News Service
April 5th, 2000
Because Montiel has been in prison since May 2, 1999, the Goldman Prize jury decided to announce this year's Prize for North America 12 days early in the hope that an early announcement will have a positive impact on his trial.

USA: Occidental Chairman Sues Protestors for Harassment
by Timna TannersReuters
April 4th, 2000
The chairman of Occidental Petroleum is staging his own protest against the human rights groups who picket his home and office --he is suing them for harassment and wants a court to grant him damages.

US: A Blank Check from Washington for Colombia's Dirty War
by Mark WeisbrotAlterNet
April 1st, 2000
One of the problems with deleting our government's worst crimes from America's historical hard drive is that they tend to recur. How many people even know the hideous story of how we supported and financed the slaughter of tens of thousands innocent civilians, teachers, health care and church workers in Central America in the 1980s?

US: Slashing Safety?
by Nina ShapiroSeattle Weekly
April 1st, 2000
Is Boeing compromising on safety in order to cut costs? Some workers believe so, pointing to changes in the way the company carries out inspections. A former head of the National Transportation Safety Board, among others, seems to agree.

USA: Where Was the Color at A16 in DC?
by Colin RajahColorLines
April 1st, 2000
After Seattle, the movement set its sights on mobilizing for the annual Spring meetings of the World Bank and International Monetary Fund (IMF) in Washington, D.C. this past April 16. Known as A16, these actions were also hugely successful.

SRI LANKA: Massive Protest Against US Mining Project
Inter Press Service
March 30th, 2000
Scientists, trade unionists and priests joined farmers from a northeast Sri Lanka village on Thursday in a massive protest in the capital against government plans to hand over phosphate mines to a US-based transnational company (TNC).

USA: Oxy CEO Confronted by U'wa Leader in Congresswoman's Office
Environment News Service
March 30th, 2000
A surprise encounter in the Congressional office of Georgia Representative Cynthia McKinney today brought the vice president of Occidental Petroleum face to face with the president of the U'wa indigenous people who are fighting the company's oil drilling on their traditional land in Colombia.

Burma: US Oil Giant Pulls Out of Country
Agence France Presse
March 29th, 2000
Oil services provider Baker Hughes has become the latest United States firm to pull out of Burma, human rights campaigners and the firm's local partner said Wednesday.

USA: Over 2,500 Challenge Biotech Industry To Debate
by Raphael Lewis and Jamal E. WatsonBoston Globe
March 27th, 2000
Despite fears of violence in the streets, an estimated 2,500 chanting, costumed demonstrators kept their promise to march peacefully through the Back Bay yesterday as they voiced their opposition to the spread of biotechnology.

US: High Court Considers Massachusetts Anti-Burma Law
by Steven MufsonWashington Post
March 23rd, 2000
Tearing a page from the anti-apartheid movement, the two drew up legislation that penalized companies with ties to Burma when those firms competed for Massachusetts state contracts. Using the draft of an anti-apartheid bill, they crossed out South Africa and inserted Burma. Two years later, the measure became law.

Philippines: Strike Over Gas Hike Paralyzes Southern City
by Edwin O. Fernandez and Charlie C. SeasePhilippine Daily Inquirer (Internet Edition)
March 23rd, 2000
Jeepney drivers and operators, slumdwellers and other sectoral representatives yesterday took to the streets to demand an oil price rollback and the resignation or ouster of President Estrada.

Bulgaria: Up to 10,000 Protest IMF Ausertity
Associated Press
March 22nd, 2000
Up to 10,000 people gathered in downtown Sofia on Wednesday to protest the country's unemployment, poverty and temporary-employment contracts.

USA: IMF on the Ropes
by Russell Mokhiber and Robert WeissmanFocus on Corporations
March 21st, 2000
But these jujitsu tactics may be running out of steam. Political momentum against the IMF ratcheted up in recent weeks, when the Meltzer Commission, a bipartisan advisory commission to the U.S. Congress, released its report.

USA: High Court Rules FDA Lacks Power Over Tobacco
by James ViciniReuters
March 21st, 2000
A closely divided U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) lacks the power to regulate tobacco products, handing President Clinton a stinging setback in the effort to curb youth smoking.

India: Clinton's Corporate Entourage
by Amit SrivastavaSpecial to CorpWatch
March 20th, 2000
Violence in Kashmir and nuclear proliferation are dominating the mainstream headlines on President Clinton's trip to South Asia. And while security issues are clearly on the agenda in Clinton's meetings with Indian Prime Minister Atal Behari Vajpayee, the press is ignoring an equally significant part of the trip: trade.

CARIBBEAN: Banana Producers Fear Falling Victim to US-EU Trade War
by Brian KenetyInter Press Service
March 16th, 2000
A group of Caribbean banana-producing states fear that a prolonged lull in negotiations between the European Union (EU) and the United States over the EU's banana import regime could work against them.

USA: General Motors Quits Global Warming Lobby Group
by David GoodmanAssociated Press
March 15th, 2000
Environmentalists are claiming victory following General Motors Corp.'s decision to quit a lobbying group that has led the opposition to a 1997 global warming treaty reached in Kyoto, Japan.

Mexico: First Census of Street Working Children
Child Labour News Service
March 15th, 2000
Alejandro and Adrian are two of 14,322 children who work illegally on the streets of this city of 20 million people, according to the first survey Mexico City has conducted on the trend. Mexican law prohibits children younger than 14 from working. According to Isabel Molina, director of the federal System for the Whole Development of the Family, officials completed the study, supported by UNICEF, in order to draft policies to resolve the problem.

Mozambique: Leaders Call For Debt Cancellation
Panafrican News Agency
March 15th, 2000
Leaders of the Southern Africa Development Community Tuesday called on the international community to cancel all foreign debts owed by Mozambique.

Netherlands: Greenpeace Buys Shell Stock
Associated Press
March 14th, 2000
The Amsterdam-based environmentalist group announced the purchase of $240,000 worth of Royal Dutch/Shell Group equity to try to pressure the Anglo-Dutch energy conglomerate to build a huge solar panel production plant.

USA: Wolfensohn Responds - Limiting the World Bank
by James D. WolfensohnWashington Post
March 13th, 2000
During the past few days a good deal of coverage has been focused on the Meltzer Commission Report on the International Financial Institutions, and what it might mean for the World Bank. Let me take this opportunity to lay out some real concerns that we at the bank have, and also to set the record straight.

Malaysia: Consumer Groups Press for Labelling of GE Food
by Anil NettoInter Press Service
March 13th, 2000
Buoyed by a string of recent campaign successes, consumer groups around the world are now demanding mandatory labelling of genetically modified (GM)food as they mark World Consumer Rights Day on Mar 15, reflecting growing concern about the unregulated production and trade of GM food crops.

US: Anti-Sweatshop Student Sit-Ins Continue
UNITE Stop Sweatshop News
March 9th, 2000
As students celebrated anti-sweatshop victories at Wisconsin, Indiana, and other schools, sit-ins began at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore and Macalester College in Minneapolis.

Europe: Protests Against GE Foods Spread Across Continent
Environment News Service
March 8th, 2000
In time for the spring planting season, the pressure group Friends of the Earth Europe is launching its biggest ever campaign on foods and crops made from genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in 22 countries across Europe.

USA: Between Revolution and Reform - The Meltzer Commission's Vision
by Martin WolfFinancial Times
March 8th, 2000
The ''report of the international financial institution advisory commission'' sounds so innocuous. It is not. In the current US debate, it will be explosive. The question is whether it will end with pure destruction or efficient replacements for the International Monetary Fund, World Bank and regional development banks of today.

USA: Union Carbide CEO Fugitive in Bhopal Suit
by Chris HedgesNew York Times
March 7th, 2000
Warren M. Anderson, chairman of the Union Carbide Corporation during the 1984 chemical disaster at Bhopal, India, has apparently gone into hiding to avoid a summons to appear in a Manhattan federal court as part of civil proceedings against him and the company, say lawyers who have hired a private investigator to locate Mr. Anderson.

ZAMBIA: Environmentalists Caution New Mine Investors
The Times of Zambia (Lusaka)
March 6th, 2000
A non-governmental organisation has cautioned the new mine investors not to willfully pollute the environment despite a bill which indemnifies them from litigation against environmental degradation. Citizens for a better environment, a Kitwe based NGO, warned that should the new mines violate the rights of the people to a clean environment, they would face the wrath of the public.

Scotland: Consumer Advocates Throw Down Gauntlet on GE Foods
Agence France Presse
February 29th, 2000
Genetically-modified foods face a consumer revolt if biotech corporations, scientists and policy-makers fail to overhaul the way they vet the safety of these novel products, consumer watchdogs said Tuesday.

JAPAN: People Power Overcomes Nuclear Power
by Jonathan WattsThe Guardian (UK)
February 23rd, 2000
Japan's nuclear power industry suffered a historic defeat yesterday when one of the country's biggest utilities was forced to scrap plans for a power plant that it has been trying to build for 37 years.

USA: Big Tobacco Off the Ropes?
by Russell Mokhiber and Robert WeissmanFocus on the Corporation
February 23rd, 2000
Whether Big Tobacco succeeds will depend in significant part on whether tobacco control groups and their many new allies of various stripes refuse to succumb to Big Tobacco's combined intimidation and charm offensive.

Mozambique: Country Staggers Under Debt Despite Devastating Floods
Financial Times
February 23rd, 2000
Mozambique, hit by the worst floods in 30 years, is having to pay $1.4 million a week in debt service, the Jubilee 2000 Coalition revealed in a statement to the press on 23rd February.

US: Chicago Sweatshop Plan May Be Model
by Martha IrvineAssociated Press
February 19th, 2000
They sound like stories from another time. But a survey of the working poor in Chicago and surrounding suburbs has found otherwise. More than a third of the 800 workers questioned many of them immigrants described conditions in factories, restaurants and other workplaces that the federal government would deem ''sweatshops.''

USA: Farmers Desert Genetically Modified Crops
by Julian BorgerThe Guardian (UK)
February 17th, 2000
US farmers have just finished buying seed for the coming growing season, and early studies suggest that a significant proportion are abandoning GM. A market survey reveals that US farmers plan to plant 16% less genetically modified (GM) corn than they did last year.

USA: Clinton Backs Multinationals Against States in Challenge to Burma Sanctions
by Jim LobeInter Press Service
February 16th, 2000
In a major boost for the forces of economic globalisation, US President Bill Clinton has decided to back multinational corporations in a key court challenge to a Massachusetts law designed to promote democracy in Burma.

US: Vermiculite Products Could Expose Consumers to Asbestos
by Cat LazaroffEnvironment News Service
February 15th, 2000
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is investigating whether products made from vermiculite could expose consumers to asbestos. Preliminary test results on common household products indicate that a particularly lethal form of asbestos fibers contaminates some attic insulation, but researchers do not yet know whether normal use of these products could endanger consumers.

Thailand: Outgoing IMF Chief Hit With Pie
Associated Press
February 13th, 2000
Thailand -- The outgoing chief of the International Monetary Fund got a rude retirement present Sunday when an American anti-free trade activist penetrated security at a trade conference and hit him with a pie in the face.

Brazil: IMF -- Shut Up or Get Out
Associated Press
February 12th, 2000
The International Monetary Fund has retracted criticism of Brazil's anti-poverty plan in the wake of national indignation and calls for IMF representative Lorenzo Perez to be kicked out of the country.

USA: People of Color Battle Toxics in Communities
by Cat LazaroffEnvironment News Service
February 11th, 2000
Ten African American children are visiting Washington, D.C. this week, but they did not come to see the usual tourist attractions. They are here to illustrate the dangerous legacy of hazardous wastes, contaminated manufacturing sites, and polluting industries, placed predominantly in poor, non-White communities.

World: Who is Paying the Cost of Our Fuel Bills?
by George MonbiotThe Guardian Weekly
February 10th, 2000
The effects of global warming are cruelly ironic: the impact of fossil-fuel consumption will be most severe in regions where the least fuel has been consumed. Sub-Saharan Africa is becoming drier: in East Africa droughts of the kind that used to strike every 40 years are arriving every four or five.

JAPAN: Officials Blamed for Promoting Toxic Incinerators in Thailand
Environment News Service
February 9th, 2000
Japan is using official lending agencies which provide development aid to promote the export of Japanese incinerators to Thailand, Greenpeace alleges.

Canada: Oil Company Targeted for Ties to Sudanese Military
by Mark BourrieInter Press Service
February 7th, 2000
An oil company headquartered in Alberta, Canada, is the target of a divestment campaign aimed at forcing the company to stop its partnership with the Sudanese government in the exploitation of oil fields in the war-torn southern region of Sudan.

USA: The Dot-com Obsession Warping the Economy
by David FriedmanLos Angeles Times
February 6th, 2000
Spurred by unprecedented stock-market wealth, land-use, tax and development policies are skewing economic incentives almost exclusively toward a postindustrial, dot-com society. Alternatives that might better distribute technology and capital among the population and diversify the economy are being sacrificed.

Colombia: ILO to Investigate Alleged Rights Violations
by Yadira FerrerInter Press Service
February 4th, 2000
Colombia has come under the scrutiny of the International Labour Organisation (ILO), which begins Feb 7 to investigate alleged violations of the freedom to organise and of the human rights of workers.

US: Activists Resign from University Panel on Sweatshops
by Sharif DurhamsJournal Sentinel
February 2nd, 2000
Student activists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have split with university administrators on how to prevent abuse of workers in factories that make Badger-licensed clothing. The students say Chancellor David Ward is ignoring their concerns.

WORLD: Critics Fear New Treaty Subordinates Biosafety to Trade
by Danielle KnightInter Press Service
February 1st, 2000
Environmental groups, while praising aspects of the first worldwide treaty governing trade in genetically modified organisms (GMO), criticise the scope of the agreement and worry it could be subverted by powerful free trade interests.

US: Asbestos Tainted Ore Affected Thousands, Suit Charges
by Cat LazaroffEnvironment News Service
February 1st, 2000
A class action lawsuit filed Monday seeks cleanup and medical monitoring funds to help more than 26,000 people exposed to asbestos from contaminated vermiculite ore. The suit alleges that decades of unsafe mining operations in Libby, Montana have led to illness and death for thousands of mineworkers, processing plant employees, and Libby residents.

US: University President Now on Flip Side of Protests
by James M. O'NeillPhiladelphia Inquirer
February 1st, 2000
As a student at the University of Pennsylvania and Columbia University in the 1960s, Judith Rodin was caught up in the social activism of the era. Last week, Penn's president found the tables turned as she negotiated with students who spent the entire week staging a sit-in in her outer office.

India: Construction Industry Uses Toxic Waste
by Nidhi JamwalDown to Earth
January 31st, 2000
Ignorance is bliss. This seems to be the state of mind of the Indian government for several environment-related issues, including that of hazardous waste like phosphogypsum (PG). A byproduct of the fertiliser industry, PG is used liberally by the construction industry and its use is promoted by the government.

USA: Closing the Lid on the Chlorine Industry
by Russell Mokhiber and Robert WeissmanFocus on Corporations
January 31st, 2000
Thornton is a research fellow at Columbia University's Center for Environmental Research and Conservation. His forthcoming book, Pandora's Poison: Chlorine, Health and a New Environmental Strategy (March 2000, MIT Press), argues that chlorine and the organochlorine chemicals made from it pose a global health and environmental threat.

Peru: Isolated Amazon Tribes Threatened By Logging
by Danielle KnightInter Press Service
January 28th, 2000
The survival of four indigenous tribes of the Peruvian Amazon rainforest -- who have decided to live in voluntary isolation -- is being threatened by commercial logging, warned indigenous leaders who traveled here this week from the South American country.

USA: Protestors at WTO Plan DC Follow-Up
by John BurgessWashington Post
January 26th, 2000
Activist groups that paralyzed downtown Seattle during the World Trade Organization conference late last year plan to converge on Washington in April to protest a joint meeting of the World Bank and International Monetary Fund.

Canada: Biosafety Talks Trigger Demonstrations and Debate
Environment News Service
January 24th, 2000
Delegates from 130 nations arriving this morning at the International Aviation Building in Montreal to restart talks on a set of rules for the transborder movement of genetically modified organisms were greeted by protesters and police. But temperatures of 15 degrees Celsius below zero kept demonstrators subdued and police idle.

USA: One Big Company
by Russell Mokhiber and Robert WeissmanFocus on the Corporation
January 12th, 2000
AOL has been a leading proponent of open access -- meaning those who control high-speed internet access through cable systems or other means not have the power to discriminate against internet service providers that they do not control or favor. In buying Time Warner, AOL suddenly acquires one of the largest cable systems in the country, and gains a material interest in opposing open access.

UK: A Bitter Pill for the World's Poor
by Isabel HiltonThe Guardian
January 5th, 2000
It is a story repeated daily in towns and villages across the developing world. Whatever the recorded cause of death - leishmaniasis, tuberculosis, pneumonia - the real cause is poverty. Poor people in tropical countries are at risk from a range of diseases for which they cannot get treatment - either because medicines are available at prices they cannot afford or, worse still, because no medicines are available.

USA: Seattle Dismisses 280 WTO-related Cases
Associated Press
January 4th, 2000
Citing lack of evidence, the city attorney said Monday he was dropping about 280 cases against demonstrators who blocked the streets and demonstrated against the recent World Trade Organization meetings.

Shintech Environmental Racism
Lousiana Environmental Action Network and Greenpeace USA
September 1st, 1999
In September 1998, the environmental justice movement in the US had a very important victory against a major corporation, Shintech, a subsidiary of Shin-etsu Chemical of Japan.

USA: Prisoners Who Speak Out Receive Punishment, Suit Says
by Peter BlumbergSan Francisco Daily Journal
August 23rd, 1999
Two inmates allege in a lawsuit to be filed today that state corrections officials violated their civil rights by punishing them for helping the media expose a prison labor program as an illegal sweatshop, according to their lawyers.

MEXICO: Consumers Accuse Phone Company of Human Rights Violations
by Kent PatersonBorderlines
August 11th, 1999
For more than four years, Graciela Ramos and Women for Mexico have been a thorn in Telmex's side. The group has waged a campaign to force Mexico's privately-owned, local phone service giant to cancel measured service, provide devices that track the number of phone calls made from a home, and ensure that economically disadvantaged groups have access to both public and private telephones.

US: History of U.S. sanctions shows most haven't worked
by Michael PaulsonSeattle Post-Intelligencer
May 11th, 1999
The U.S. regularly imposes economic sanctions -- generally defined as restrictions on foreign commerce -- for purposes of foreign policy or national security. But numerous studies show that many of the targets of U.S. sanctions -- countries such as Iraq, Iran and Cuba -- do not change their behavior in the face of sanctions.

India: A Doctor Takes on Big Tobacco
by Frederick NoronhaThird World Features
May 1st, 1999
India (and South East Asia) are a huge market for tobacco. Cigarette companies are also targetting youth between 15-25. Two countries where tobacco sales are expected to zoom up are India and Indonesia.

US: Raytheon Wants IDs of Net Chatters
by Leslie MillerAssociated Press
March 5th, 1999
Raytheon Corp. has sued 21 people for allegedly disclosing company secrets via the Internet in a case that raises questions about the wisdom of chatting about your employer online.

US: US banks named in Holocaust suit
BBC News
December 24th, 1998
Lawyers acting on behalf of victims of the Jewish holocaust and their families have accused two US banks of seizing their wealth during the Nazi occupation of France.

Bordering Injustice
by Traci Griggs and Martha ValdsLa Jornada
December 9th, 1998
Non-profit environmental justice groups such as the San Diego-based Environmental Health Coalition (EHC), are trying to remove the rose colored glasses and expose the harsh reality of the U.S/Mexico border in an attempt to protect public and environmental health. EHC's battle against an abandoned maquiladora turned toxic dump, serves as a microcosm of what's wrong with border health and how NAFTA, for the most part, has exacerbated the problem.

A Movement Blossoms: Cross-Border Activism Picks Up Speed
by Kent PatersonBorderlines
October 20th, 1998
In October 1998, after years of protest by an unprecedented bi-national coalition, the proposed Sierra Blanca nuclear waste dump was defeated. The proposed site for the commercial nuclear waste dump was just 16 miles from the Texas-Mexico border.

US: Ford and GM Scrutinized for Alleged Nazi Collaboration
by Michael DobbsWashington Post
September 30th, 1998
Three years after Swiss banks became the target of a worldwide furor over their business dealings with Nazi Germany, major American car companies find themselves embroiled in a similar debate.

Death, Neglect and the Bottom Line
by William Allen and Kim BellSt. Louis Post-Dispatch
September 27th, 1998
St. Louis-based Correctional Medical Services leads the expanding field of private companies providing medical care behind bars. The industry tries to keep a low profile, but a five-month investigation by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch found a disturbing pattern of deaths and untreated illnesses behind bars.

MEXICO: NGO Battles Telmex Planning Move into US Market
by Kent PatersonBorderlines
September 1st, 1998
U.S. consumers may soon have yet another long-distance phone company competing for their monthly accounts. After years of wrangling, Telefonos de Mexico (Telmex) was recently granted approval by the Federal Communications Commission to test-market telephone services aimed at Spanish-speakers in Tucson, AZ.

The Mexican Version of Pulpwood Plantations
by Alejandro VillamarWorld Rainforest Movement Bulletin
August 1st, 1998
In response to pressure from the maquiladora industry, the Mexican government is now paving the way for the large-scale pulpwood plantations in order to provide industry with raw material to produce cheap pulp and paper.

US: No Remorse from Raytheon Protesters
by Sarah GodcherEagle-Tribune
April 23rd, 1998
Seven anti-war protesters arrested at Raytheon last month held a vigil outside the Lawrence courthouse before a pre-trial hearing yesterday. Shown here are (from left) former North Andover resident Sean Donahue of Durham, N.H., and Marcia Gagliardi and Harriet Nestel, both of Athol, talking to Shannon O'Connor of Maine. But all seven self-described "Raytheon Peacemakers" rejected the offer in favor of a jury trial - all the while admitting they did cross a boundary line established by police.

India: New Computer Operating System Takes Country by Storm
by B. HarshIndia Abroad News Service
February 9th, 1998
MUMBAI -- Linux, a computer operating system that has thrown up the biggest ever challenge to Microsoft's monopoly and which got a boost with the Hollywood blockbuster ''Titanic'', is taking the Indian software industry by storm.

China: Reviewing Ban of the Arms sales on China
by Steven Lee Myers New York Times
January 18th, 1998
On the eve of his trip to Asia this week, Secretary of Defense William S. Cohen pressed the Clinton Administration to let an American arms maker sell spare parts to China, despite a ban on sales of military equipment imposed after the Tiananmen Square massacre in 1989, Administration officials say.

US: The Northrop Grumman B-2 Boondoggle
by Ken SilversteinMultinational Monitor
September 1st, 1997
As the monitor goes to press, the U.S. Congress appears headed for a showdown vote on the fate of Northrop-Grumman's B-2 bomber, the single most expensive piece of military equipment ever designed, with a per unit price of about $2 billion. Congress has already allocated $44 billion for the project, a figure that exceeds the annual defense budget for all but four nations in the world (England, France, Japan and Germany). Now, hawks in the House led by Representative Norm Dicks of Washington state -- a major recipient of campaign cash from Boeing, a B-2 subcontractor -- are trying to win another $9 billion for the bomber. The Senate has voted to cap production at the current level of 20. A conference committee will soon resolve the issue.

Nike Must Stop Exploiting My Students
by Yvonne H.D. NobleLos Angeles Times
July 26th, 1997
Last fall, a reporter from The Times asked me about the relationship between Crenshaw High School boys' basketball program and Nike in terms of what the corporations donates to the basketball players. To my knowledge as the principal, I told him, the company gave each member of the boys' team a pair of tennis shoes, just as Karl Kani, a smaller African American ownedbusiness, gave shoes to members of the girls' team.

Double Standards: Notes for a Border Screenplay
by Debbie NathanTexas Observer
June 6th, 1997
The case had been settled only minutes ago, and now jurors for Mendoza v. Contico were seated in a room outfitted with movie theater chairs and plugs for devices like VCRs. They were in the ''Ceremonial Court'' in El Paso, where victorious lawyers often hold post-trial press conferences.

Canada: Business-Education Partnerships a Troubling Trend
by Bernie Froese-Germain and Marita MollEducation Monitor
June 1st, 1997
Berne Froese-Germain and Martia Moll, two researchers with the Canadian Teachers Federation, outline the scope of the problem.

USA: Cigarette Companies Target Ethnic Groups to Expand Markets, Activists Complain
by Annie NakaoSan Francisco Examiner
May 18th, 1997
Asian community leaders -- mindful of ''World No Tobacco Day'' on May 31 -- say their battle to reduce high smoking rates among Asian Americans is making inroads but can't succeed as long as cigarette advertisers keep targeting their neighborhoods.

Saudi Arabia: Royal Family Gets Quiet Help From U.S. Firm With Connections
by Charles J HanleyAssociated Press
March 22nd, 1997
Vinnell first came to Saudi Arabia 22 years ago on a "one-time" training mission. Today, under a Pentagon-supervised contract, its military specialists are permanent on-scene consultants throughout the National Guard. Three hundred Vinnell experts, almost all U.S. military veterans, many recently discharged, instruct Saudi guardsmen in the latest weaponry, supervise supply operations, teach brigade-level tactics, help operate a hospital and are updating the Guard's data processing, among other functions.

US: Old hands hold hands with Beijing on trade policy
by George ArchibaldThe Washington Times
March 3rd, 1997
Big bucks and big names are proving to be corporate America's weapons of choice in a heightened lobbying push to head off any U.S. retaliation for China's reported involvement in the unfolding political fund-raising scandal.

USA: RSI Suit May Finally Catch Up with Apple
by Reynolds HoldingSan Francisco Chronicle
January 19th, 1997
For the first time ever, a keyboard maker has lost a lawsuit involving repetitive stress injury. And, with dozens of suits pending against it, this could be bad news for Apple.

USA: Intel Computer Chip Plant Tests New Environmental Rules
by Pratap ChatterjeeInter Press Service
October 14th, 1996
SAN FRANCISCO -- The 1.3-billion-dollar expansion of a computer chip plant near Phoenix, Arizona, heralds a new era in environmental regulation, according to company and U.S. government officials.

US: Disney Shows Two Worlds
by Mark FritzAssociated Press
September 30th, 1996
Because Disney World controls so much of its corporate and municipal universe, it can't help but act in a heavy-handed manner in order to ferociously protect its self-interest.

US: Lockheed Talks, the Pentagon Listens
by William HartungWashington Post
June 26th, 1996
His name is not a household word, but Norman Augustine is one of those rare Washington power brokers for whom a Cabinet-level position would be a demotion. Augustine is the chief executive officer of Lockheed Martin Corp., the world's largest defense conglomerate, and a key player in the network of quasi-official military-industrial interest groups. He will probably have as much to say about how much money the United States spends on weapons through the end of this decade as any secretary of defense.

Saudi Arabia: Mercenaries, Inc.
by William D. HartungThe Progressive
April 1st, 1996
The sanitized version of American foreign policy asserts that the United States is hard at work promoting democratic values around the world in the face of attacks from totalitarian ideologies ranging from communism during the Cold War to Islamic fundamentalism today. Every once in a while an incident occurs that contradicts this reassuring rhetoric by revealing the secret underside of American policy, which is far more concerned with propping up pliable regimes that serve the interests of U.S. multinational corporations than it is with any meaningful notion of democracy. The November 13, 1995 bombing of the Saudi Arabian National Guard (SANG) headquarters and an adjacent building housing a U.S. military training mission is one such incident.

Brazil: Amazon Contractor Raytheon has CIA Ties
by Pratap ChatterjeeInter Press Service
December 3rd, 1995
A contract to monitor the Amazon rainforest in Brazil will include a shadowy company once described as ''virtually indistinguishable'' from the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). The 1.4-billion-dollar contract for satellite monitoring of drug trafficking and deforestation in the 3.2-million-square-kilometre forests in the Brazilian Amazon was awarded last summer to Raytheon, a 12-billion-dollar, Massachusetts-based company, Raytheon, that makes Patriot and Sidewinder missiles.

Brazil: Police Wiretap Jeopardizes Raytheon Radar Project
by Katherine Ellison The Miami Herald
November 25th, 1995
It was meant to be a shining model of the new era of inter-American trade: a $1.4 billion U.S. contract -- the largest ever awarded in Brazil -- in which the Massachusetts- based Raytheon Corp. would build a vast radar project in the Amazon jungle.

South Korea: General Dynamics Denies Bribery Allegations
by John MintzWashington Post
October 26th, 1995
A South Korean legislator alleged yesterday that General Dynamics Corp. paid former president Roh Tae Woo at least $100 million in 1991 in a successful effort to persuade the South Korean military to buy the company's F-16 fighters. The Falls Church-based company strenuously denied the allegation.

World: Bribe Probe For US Arms Firms
by Mark TranGuardian (London)
September 2nd, 1995
The US government is investigating two of America's biggest defence contractors, Lockheed Martin and General Dynamics, for possible bribery in foreign sales - with the world's most widely used fighter, the F-16, the apparent focus of interest.

INDIA: Setting the Record Straight
by Joshua Karliner
December 4th, 1994
A Conversation with Edward A. Munoz, former Managing Director of Union Carbide India, Limited. An interview with the former head of Union Carbide India conducted by Joshua Karliner, Executive Director of CorpWatch, in association with the Bhopal Action Resource Center of the Council on International and Public Affairs.

US: Missile-Blower
by Daniel GoldenBoston Globe
July 19th, 1992
When MIT professor Theodore Postol punctured the Patriot missile's invincible reputation, he made some powerful enemies: Raytheon, the Army, and MIT administrators who valued corporate contributions over academic freedom

US: General Electric Expose Garners an Oscar
by Megan RosenfeldWashington Post
April 23rd, 1992
Chasnoff's film indicts the multi-billion-dollar corporation on two counts: failing to clean up the site of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in Washington state, and knowingly poisoning workers with asbestos and radiation at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory in Schenectady, N.Y. Scenes of Hanford area residents who have had or know of birth defects and cancer are juxtaposed with the familiar jingle: "GE: We bring good things to life."

Turkey: U.S. Businessman Slain; Terror Group Claims Responsibility
by Ahmet BalanNew York Times
March 22nd, 1991
Gunmen today killed a former U.S. Air Force officer working for an American company in Turkey, police said. A Marxist terrorist group claimed responsibility. It was the third time in two months the group - Dev Sol, or Revolutionary Left - said it was behind armed attacks on Americans.

US: The "Patriots" at Raytheon
by Jim DonahueMultinational Monitor
March 1st, 1991
Raytheon Corporation has recently become known throughout the United States as an outstanding defender of democracy thanks to its Patriot missile, which has attracted so much media attention for its role in the Persian Gulf War.

US: Secret Task Led to Web Of Firms; Virginian Ran Covert Missions
Washington Post
March 22nd, 1987
The mission that apparently launched the network of private companies now embroiled in the Iran-contra affair took place in October 1983, when an obscure U.S. Army unit asked a retired lieutenant colonel to undertake a secret job in the Caribbean, according to informed sources.

US: Oman Hold Delicate Negotiations Over Bases; Sultanate Pushing for Greater Control Over Access to Persian Gulf Facilities
by David B. OttawayWashington Post
July 19th, 1985
The United States has been involved for two months in delicate negotiations with the Persian Gulf sultanate of Oman, which is seeking more control over U.S. access to, and use of, its strategically located airfields and other military facilities.

Saudi Arabia: How U.S. Is Helping in Huge Arms Buildup by Saudi Arabia
by Smith HempstoneU.S. News & World Report
April 17th, 1978
An impressive combination of U.S. weapons and American know-how is helping turn this thinly populated kingdom into one of the leading military powers in the entire Middle East.

Saudi Arabia: This Gun For Hire
by Kim Willenson with Nicholas C. Profitt in Beirut and Lloyd Norman in WashingtonNewsweek
February 24th, 1975
In the aptly named Los Angeles suburb of Alhambra last week, a private contractor was recruiting a ragtag army of Vietnam veterans for a paradoxical mission: to train Saudi Arabian troops to defend the very oil fields that Henry Kissinger recently warned the U.S. might one day have to invade.

Saudi Arabia: Vinnell Adds Saudis To Its Trainee Roster
Business Week
February 24th, 1975
Vinnell Corp., has a $77-million contract to train Saudi Arabian forces to defend Saudi oil fields, but the Pentagon sidesteppped any probing questions about the contract, shunting them to the State Dept., which had approved it.

ARGENTINA: High Court Provides a Roadmap Against Pollution
by Marcela ValenteInter Press News Service
The Matanza-Riachuelo river basin, the most polluted in Argentina for more than a century, could begin to see some cleaner waters as the result of an innovative ruling by the National Supreme Court of Justice -- considered a landmark in the history of Latin American environmental law.

US: Merck Research Plant Chemicals Kill Fish in Pennsylvania Federal Authorities Say
by Deborah YaoThe Associated Press
Drugmaker Merck & Co.'s research facility in West Point dumped a chemical compound that included cyanide into the sewer system, killing more than 1,000 fish in Wissahickon Creek, federal authorities said Thursday.

US: Company Ties Not Always Noted in Security Push
When the storm erupted several months ago over plans by a United Arab Emirates-based company to take over management of a half-dozen American port terminals, one voice resonated in Washington. Stephen E. Flynn has advocated a port security system that can check every container bound for the United States for radioactive threats.

INDIA: Creating dispensable citizens
by Usha RamanathanThe Hindu
This is not merely about whether the dam should be constructed or not. It is about condoning state inaction and then blaming the victim.



US: Jurors Weigh Custer Battles Fraud Case
by John E. MulliganThe Providence Journal
In closing arguments, the attorney for two whistleblowers asks for more than $10 million in damages against the Rhode Island-based company accused of war profiteering in Iraq.

US:
by Michael BarbaroThe New
Wal-Mart Stores, facing a raft of state legislation that would require it to increase spending on employee health insurance, will lift several of its long-standing and most-criticized restrictions on eligibility over the next year, the giant retailer said this morning.

US: Deal Lets Big Farms Skirt Pollution Fines
by John HeilprinAssociated Press
The Bush administration will let thousands of factory-style farms escape severe penalties for fouling the air and water with animal excrement in exchange for data to help curb future pollution.

LIBERIA: Liberia recruits a new army
by Elizabeth BluntBBC News
The new Armed forces of Liberia are being trained by Dyncorp.

US: AT&T to pay $25 million to settle Calif. lawsuit
AT&T Inc. will pay $25 million to end a lawsuit by California officials alleging the company failed to test properly and repair its underground storage tanks, the state attorney general said on Tuesday.

IRAQ: Indian Youths Coerced Into Iraq
by Ajay BharadwajDaily News & Analysis India
Human trafficking is not a new phenomenon in Punjab. However, it is the landing of young aspirants in Iraq that has started raising hackles.

US: Pentagon Stalls on Bannning Contractors that Use Forced Labor
by Cam SimpsonThe Chicago Tribune
A proposal prohibiting defense contractor involvement in human trafficking for forced prostitution and labor was drafted by the Pentagon last summer, but five defense lobbying groups oppose key provisions and a final policy still appears to be months away.

IRAQ: KBR Workers in Iraq Paid 50 cents an Hour
by Pamela HessUnited Press International
KBR hires out subcontractors whose job is to recruit, transport, house, feed and pay "third-country" nationals to stock, prepare, serve and clean up at the dining facilities at 43 bases across Iraq. As pressure to keep contract costs down, subcontractors have moved from country to country in search of cheaper labor markets.



US: CACI Plans to Drop Interrogation Work
by Ellen McCarthyThe Washington Post
CACI International Inc., the Arlington-based defense contractor that attracted controversy when an employee was accused of participating in the Abu Ghraib prison abuses, is getting out of the interrogation business.

US: All Eyes on Halliburton As contacts Turn into Contracts
The Observer
Concerns in the US are mounting that Katrina could prompt a round of 'pork barrel' contracts.

IRAQ: Turn the Lights On
by Joe CochraneNewsweek International
Americans were as wrong about the health of Iraq's infrastructure as they were about their welcome as liberators and the insurgents know that depriving Iraq of power is at least as effective as killing soldiers and policemen.

IRAQ: The Trillion Dollar War Chart

CorpWatch: Holding Corporations Accountable
CorpWatch is a non-profit that conducts investigative research and journalism to expose corporate malfeasance and to advocate for multinational corporate accountability and transparency. We work to foster global justice, independent media activism and democratic control over corporations.

US: Want Big Bucks For Big Risks? Jobs Open In Iraq, Afghanistan
Plumbers, electricians, truck drivers, food-service workers, logistics specialists and other professionals work 12-hour days providing support services to American troops. It's hard, dangerous work. But the pay is high. A year on the job can change the average person's financial life.

IRAQ: Security Fears and Costs are Road Block to Rebuilding
by Rick EmertStars and Stripes
Of the $18 billion budgeted for the Iraq Reconstruction Program, $7 billion is spent on securing the workers and the construction sites that are contracted and overseen by the Corps of Engineers Gulf Region District and the Project and Contracting Office.

JAPAN: Koizumi's Postal Bomb
The Prime Minister's rejected reform legislation by Japan's Upper House is grave news for him and his ruling Liberal Democratic Party.

IRAQ: Friendly-fire victim Fights for Compensation with Claims that Titan Abandoned Him
by David Washburn and Bruce V. BigelowThe San Diego Union-Tribune
Mazin al Nashi's worries escalated when he learned that the fledgling Iraqi insurgency had put a $250,000 bounty on the heads of interpreters. He had never received any body armor from Titan.

US: Ebbers Set to Shed His Assets
by Gretchen MorgensonNew York Times

HEAR US NOW: Support Community Wireless Networks

CHINA: Google Moves In
BBC news
Google has secured a licence to operate in China, enabling it to compete more effectively with rivals in the world's second-largest internet market.











IRAQ: Filipino Workers Urged to Leave Iraq
Associated Press
Government officials on Sunday urged about 6,000 Filipino workers to immediately leave Iraq after a foiled kidnapping injured two Filipinos, stressing that the situation there remains very dangerous for foreign workers.

CHINA: Lucent Execs face bribery charges in China and Saudi Arabia

U.S.: Cubic Receives Contract to Compete for U.S. Army Force Management Services
www.cubic.com

U.S.: Cubic Receives Contract to Compete for U.S. Army Force Management Services
www.cubic.com

IRAQ: Dirty Warriors
by Barry Yeoman Mother Jones
How South African hit men, Serbian paramilitaries, and other human rights violators became guns for hire for military contractors in Iraq

GERMANY: DaimlerChrysler Facing SEC Investigation
by David MchughNational Post (Canada)
Automaking giant DaimlerChrysler AG said Thursday that it was under investigation by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission after a fired employee told labour officials he was dismissed for complaining that the company was using secret bank accounts to bribe government officials.

U.S.: Titan Revenue Up 12 Percent, Profit Flat
by Bruce V. BigelowSan Diego Union-Tribune
Titan's wartime translator business helped drive a 12 percent increase in third-quarter revenue, but legal costs hurt.

IRAQ: $80K a Year? Many Say No Thanks
http://newsobserver.com/business/story/1758902p-8038598c.html
Scores of contractors that flocked to Iraq from around the world have also pulled out in recent months because of the escalating violence.

United Nations to use Iraq Oil-for-Food Program funds for investigation
Wall Street Journal

Jordan: World Bank Trains Iraqi Civil Servants Ahead of Development Schemes
Agence France-Presse
Seventy-five Iraqi civil servants completed here a training course organised by the World Bank ahead of implementing emergency development schemes in the war-battered country, a bank official said Monday.

Iraq: Trade Bank of Iraq Gets $2.4 bln Export Guarantees
by Haitham HaddadinReuters
The U.S.-established Trade Bank of Iraq on Saturday said it has secured a total of $2.4 billion in export guarantees for firms seeking postwar rebuilding deals. Bank President Hussein al-Uzri told a news conference in Kuwait City it was also close to signing a new deal for hundreds of millions of dollars more with a Pan-Arab organisation.

Iraq: Questions Raised About Creative Associates Contract
by Jackie SpinnerWashington Post
The Washington firm awarded a government contract worth up to $157 million to rebuild Iraq's educational system may have helped shape the proposal it was then asked to bid on, according to a critical internal government review. The inspector general's office at the U.S. Agency for International Development said Creative Associates International Inc. participated in a roundtable discussion with agency officials about Iraq's education system last November, four months before USAID invited it and four other companies to bid on the work. Creative Associates was the only firm to bid, and it listed three of the four competitors as possible subcontractors.

US: Iraq healthcare system faces $1.6 billion financing gap
by Sunita KaulThe Daily Star
After 13 years of economic sanctions, the healthcare system in Iraq is in disrepair. A further blow was dealt to it by the damage caused by the looting of hospitals and clinics since the war began and the ongoing disruptions in the delivery of supplies and equipment.

US: Bechtel criticized over school project in Iraq
by Larry KaplowPalm Beach Post-Cox News Service
President Bush and other U.S. officials tout the repairs to Iraq's schools as a hallmark of an American-led renewal, a symbol of hope for a new generation of Iraqis. But for many in Baghdad, including some U.S. troops involved in the work, Bechtel's school rehabilitation appears slipshod and wasteful.

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