Contact l Sitemap

home industries issues reasearch weblog press

Home

CorpWatch Blog : Displaying 136-137 of 137


Welcome to the CorpWatch Blog!

Posted by Brooke Shelby Biggs on December 20th, 2005

Welcome to the Corpwatch Blog! We're introducing this new feature as a tool for you to navigate our resources, and to help provide context to breaking news elsewhere on the Web.

For example, you may have read today that the ex-CEO of Qwest Communications was indicted today for illegally cashing in on his company's IPO during the Internet boom, to the tune of $100 million. But did you know that Qwest in 2001 entered into Enron's bogus scam to trade digital bandwidth like any commodity? Back then, investigators discovered that the deal was all smoke and mirrors: Qwest agreed to pay Enron $308 million for use of "dark fiber" -- unused fiber optic capacity. In exchange, Enron agreed to pay Qwest between $86 million and $195 million for access to active sections of Qwest's network. Both companies could report these phantom revenues on their balance sheets to fool investors.

It's this kind of news-behind the news only CorpWatch can offer, and we think this forum is the place to do it.

We hope you find this new blog to be useful, informative, and enlightening. Of course, we welcome your comments, complaints, and especially compliments.




Is Wal-Mart Good for You?

Posted by Brooke Shelby Biggs on June 27th, 2005

"Progressive" economist Jason Furman and Barbara Ehrenreich are currently engaged in an eye-opening dialogue over at Slate. He presents the old red-herring argument that boild down to "What do you elitist liberals have against saving working people money?"

He makes some points I'll concede that I think critics should internalize: it isn't the low prices we object to, it's the way Wal-Mart treats people. If anything, the efficiencies that allow Wal-Mart to have such low prices do not require that the company abuse its employees, fail to provide a living wage or the most basic benefits, or to source product from factories that abuse people oversees. Wal-Maerts low prices, and its low regard for its own employees has been proven to depress wages in the communities where it operates. If Wal-Mart is so clever, why doesn't it innovate when it comes to how it treats human beings? Why doesn't it spend as much money actually improving communities as it does telling us about how it improves communities?


Displaying 136-137 of 137  
< Prev  
« First Page 
« Show Complete List »