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Firestone Tire's Role in Funding Liberian Warlord Revealed
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
November 19th, 2014
Firestone, a U.S. tire company, paid out millions of dollars to Charles Taylor, a Liberian warlord in the 1990s, despite knowing about his brutal human rights record, according to documents uncovered by ProPublica, an investigative journalism website. Taylor is now serving a 50 year prison sentence for war crimes.

Four Blackwater Guards Found Guilty in 2007 Baghdad Killings
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
October 26th, 2014
A federal jury has found three former Blackwater contractors guilty of manslaughter and a fourth guilty of murder for killing 17 Iraqis in Baghdad's Nissour Square on September 16, 2007. The men were private security guards hired to provide security to U.S. government employees at the time.

Hacking Team Malware Targeted Saudi Arabia Protestors
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
June 27th, 2014
Malicious software from Hacking Team of Italy that can be used to spy on cell phones has been found by Citizen Lab activists to have been used to target people in Saudi Arabia. The software was bundled into a fake phone application for Qatif Today, a local news site.

G4S To End Israel Prison Contracts Following Protests
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
June 8th, 2014
G4S, the Anglo-Danish security contractor, has agreed to withdraw from prison work in Israel after activists disrupted the company annual general meeting for the second year in a row. The company is also under fire for ill-treatment of detainees in the UK, including the death of an Angolan man.

KBR and Halliburton Can Be Sued For Iraq Toxic Burn Pits, Court Rules
by Fatima HansiaCorpWatch Blog
April 17th, 2014
KBR and Halliburton – two major U.S. military contractors – can be sued for the health impacts of trash incineration on U.S. soldiers who served in the war in Iraq, according to a new court decision that allows a series of 57 lawsuits against the companies to go forward.

Failed Cuban “Twitter” Project Designed By U.S. Government Contractors
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
April 8th, 2014
ZunZuneo - a now defunct social media platform similar to Twitter – was designed to undermine the Cuban government by two private contractors: Creative Associates International from Washington DC and Mobile Accord, a Denver based company. Funding was provided by the U.S. Agency for International Development.

Hacking Team Spy Software Identified on U.S. Servers
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
March 7th, 2014
Two U.S. companies – Linode of New Jersey and Rackspace of Texas – have been hosting surveillance software designed by Hacking Team of Italy, according to a new report. The software was allegedly been used by governments in Ethiopia, Morocco, Turkey and the United Arab Emirates to track dissidents.

Trafficking Lawsuit Against KBR for Wrongful Deaths in Iraq Dismissed
by Richard SmallteacherCorpWatch Blog
January 17th, 2014
Families of 12 Nepali workers killed in Iraq in August 2004 have been denied permission by a federal judge to sue KBR, the former subsidiary of Halliburton of Houston, in an abrupt reversal of a previous court decision.

The Jason Bourne Strategy: CIA Contractors Do Hollywood
by Pratap ChatterjeeTomdispatch.com
December 5th, 2013
Global Response Staff is a new unit set up by the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency’s (CIA) to hire private security contractors to accompany dangerous spying missions. Unlike Jason Bourne - the fictional character on which they appear to be modeled on - this gang cannot shoot straight.

Six Telecom Companies Face Formal Complaint for Collusion With UK Spy Agency
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
November 4th, 2013
Six global telecommunications companies - British Telecom, Interoute, Level Three, Verizon Enterprise, Viatel and Vodafone Cable - are the subject of a formal complaint by Privacy International for potential violation of human rights such as the right to privacy and freedom of expression.

U.S. Security Checks Contractor Has Record of Rushing Investigations
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
September 27th, 2013
U.S. Investigations Services (USIS), the company that signed off on a background check into Aaron Alexis, the military contractor who shot 12 people dead on a U.S. Navy base in Washington DC last week, has a record of rushing investigations, according to a number of former employees.

Glimmerglass Intercepts Undersea Cable Traffic for Spy Agencies
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
August 22nd, 2013
Glimmerglass, a northern California company that sells optical fiber technology, offers government agencies a software product called “CyberSweep” to intercept signals on undersea cables. The company says their technology can analyze Gmail and Yahoo! Mail as well as social media like Facebook and Twitter to discover “actionable intelligence.”

ACLU Reveals FBI Hacking Contractors
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
August 20th, 2013
James Bimen Associates of Virginia and Harris Corporation of Florida have contracts with the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) to hack into computers and phones of surveillance targets, according to Chris Soghoian, principal technologist at American Civil Liberties Union's Speech, Privacy and Technology Project.

U.S. Maintains Aid for Contractors in Egypt, Despite Massacre
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
August 14th, 2013
Egyptian security forces launched a massive crackdown on pro-democracy protestors killing around 300 people this morning. Despite near universal condemnation for the violence, the U.S. government has refused cut off the multi-billion dollar aid program that pays companies to provide support to the Egyptian government.

Family Sues G4S For Killing Angolan Deportee
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
July 10th, 2013
The family of Jimmy Mubenga, an Angolan refugee in the UK, has brought a civil lawsuit against G4S, the world’s largest private security company. Mubenga died on October 12, 2010 while being restrained by G4S guards who were hired to help deport him from the country.

Surveillance Contractor Bug In Ecuador Embassy Fails to Stop Wikileaks
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
July 3rd, 2013
Bugging equipment from the Surveillance Group Limited, a British private detective agency, has been found in the Ecuadorean embassy in London where Julian Assange, editor of Wikileaks, has taken refuge. The spy devices have so far failed to foil the whistle blowing group's daring exploits to support Edward Snowden.

Edward Snowden and the National Security Industrial Complex
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch/IPS*
June 17th, 2013
Military contractor Booz Allen Hamilton is in the news over two of its former employees: Edward Snowden, the whistleblower, and James Clapper, U.S. intelligence czar. A review of Booz Allen's own high level conflicts of interest and shoddy work suggests that Congress should target the company, not the messenger.

Google & Facebook Discussed Secret Systems for U.S. to Spy on Users
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
June 8th, 2013
Google and Facebook have discussed – and possibly built – special portals for the U.S. government to snoop on user data, according to revelations sparked by an investigative series of articles by Glenn Greenwald of the Guardian.

Mehadrin "Jaffa" Oranges May Come from Occupied Palestinian Land
by Puck LoCorpWatch Blog
April 4th, 2013
Jaffa oranges sold in European supermarkets labeled "Made in Israel" may have been grown and packaged in the occupied Palestinian West Bank, according to a report from the Boycott Divest Sanction (BDS) movement, an international coalition of Palestinian NGOs and activists.

Boeing Helps Kill Proposed Law to Regulate Drones
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
March 30th, 2013
Boeing, the aircraft manufacturing giant from Seattle, helped defeat a Republican proposal in Washington state that would have forced government agencies to get approval to buy unmanned aerial vehicles, popularly known as drones, and to obtain a warrant before using them to conduct surveillance on individuals.

Contractors Alleged to Abuse Alcohol, Drugs, Guns at Parties In Afghanistan
by Puck LoCorpWatch Blog
November 14th, 2012
Jorge Scientific Corporation, a military contractor with nearly a billion dollars in U.S. government contracts, is being sued by former employees for “shocking misconduct” in Afghanistan. The charges include illegal and reckless use of firearms, abusing alcohol and drugs and billing the government for property destroyed during raucous parties.

Payments to Saudi Generals Investigated in UK Military Contract Bribery Case
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
August 29th, 2012
A contract between a British subsidiary of European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company and Sangcom, the communications arm of the Saudi National Guard, is being investigated after Ian Foxley, a former project manager, blew the whistle.

TrapWire Leaks Shine Light on New Video Tracking Technologies
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
August 14th, 2012
TrapWire, am intelligence contractor founded and run by former CIA officers, offers to track “suspicious” activities from surveillance video footage. The company has been spotlighted in a new Wikileaks release.

Blackwater Pays Millions To Settle Arms Smuggling Charges
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
August 9th, 2012
Blackwater has agreed to pay the U.S. government $7.5 million to settle 17 federal criminal charges that include supplying guns to the king of Jordan and offering private security and military training services to South Sudan without a license.

U.S. Federal Agencies Targeted Employees With Commercial Spy Software
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
July 23rd, 2012
SpectorSoft spyware is the latest tool to be employed by some U.S. government officials to conduct surveillance on staff, The Florida company has been revealed to be selling “keylogger” software to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to track every digital move of certain employees.

United Nations, Olympics Accused of Using “Unaccountable” Private Security
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
July 13th, 2012
Two global institutions – the United Nations and the Olympic Games – face charges that they are using “unaccountable and out of control” private security contractors. One of the companies at the heart of both controversies is G4S, a private security company in the UK.

Spies in Africa’s Skies: New Contractors for the Pentagon
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
June 18th, 2012
Sierra Nevada Corporation from Sparks, Nevada, and R-4, Inc. from Eatontown, New Jersey - are two companies at the forefront of the covert war in Africa, where they operate small Swiss aircraft to spy on behalf of the U.S. Special Operations Command.

CIA "Rendition" Contractors Data Cache To Be Released
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
May 22nd, 2012
Details of 6,500 "extraordinary rendition" flights conducted by CIA contractors to transport over 1,100 victims to and from prison sites around the world are to be released by NGOs Reprieve Access Info Europe working in collaboration with Kent University and Kingston University in the UK.

U.S. Courts to Try Contractors for Torture at Abu Ghraib
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
May 17th, 2012
Two U.S. companies can be prosecuted for the alleged role of their employees in torture at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq, a U.S. federal court ruled last week. The companies are CACI of Arlington, Virginia, which provided the interrogators at the prison, and L-3/Titan of New York city, which provided translators at the same location.

Cashing in on Terrorism
by Anna FeigenbaumCorpWatch Blog
April 24th, 2012
"Is Rioting a Form of Urban Terrorism?" The headline for a press release was a provocative introduction to the annual Counter Terror Expo in Olympia, London, which opens this week. (April 25 & 26) Eight thousand visitors are expected to descend on 400 exhibitions of counter-terrorism technologies and services.

Lockheed, General Dynamics Face UK Bank Boycott Over Cluster Bombs
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
April 10th, 2012
Lockheed Martin and General Dynamics of the U.S. face divestment from major UK banks, for manufacturing cluster bombs. The Guardian newspaper has exclusively reported that Aviva, the UK’s largest insurance company; Scottish Widows (part of the Lloyds Banking Group) and the Co-op Bank will sell shares in these companies, following a similar move by the Royal Bank of Scotland last year.

Militarizing the Middle East: Arms Shipments Continue Despite Abuses
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
March 21st, 2012
The U.S. sends weapons to Egypt, Russia sends weapons to to Syria and the European Union to Saudi Arabia, according to new reports from Amnesty and the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute. This is despite conclusive evidence that these weapons are being used for human rights abuse.

State of Surveillance
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch/The Bureau of Investigative Journalism
December 1st, 2011
A new cache of Wikileaks documents on the secretive surveillance industry uncovers 160 companies in 25 countries that make $5 billion a year selling sophisticated surveillance technology to security authorities around the world to secretly carry out mass surveillance of people via their phones and computers.

Subcontracting Substandard Services
by David IsenbergSpecial to CorpWatch
June 27th, 2011
Najlaa International Catering Services of Kuwait faces numerous complaints and court actions for non-payment of bills and alleged fraud for work conducted on U.S. military bases in Iraq. The allegations show that the Pentagon is still unable to manage subcontractors eight years after the invasion.

Billion Dollar Audit Missed by Pentagon Watchdog
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
August 30th, 2010
Military auditors failed to complete an audit of the business systems of Ohio-based Mission Essential Personnel even though it had billed for $1 billion worth of work over the last four years, largely done in Afghanistan.

U.S. Congressional Wartime Commission Targets Armed Contractors
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
June 23rd, 2010
This week, almost a decade after the U.S. "War on Terror" began, the Commission on Wartime Contracting held two days of hearings into the role of private contractors in conducting and supporting war. The Congressional witness table included Aegis, DynCorp and Triple Canopy. Curiously, Blackwater was not called; and the CEO of Torres Advanced Enterprise Solutions failed to appear.

Afghanistan, Inc.: A CorpWatch Investigative Report (2006)
by Fariba NawaSpecial to CorpWatch
April 30th, 2010
The recent boom in humanitarian aid has an underbelly largely invisible to charity sector outsiders. “Easy money: the great aid scam," packs a biting critique (Linda Polman, The Sunday Times Online, April 25). In 2006, CorpWatch’s "Afghanistan, Inc.", cited by Polman, drilled down on reconstruction dollars, in what’s become known as “Afghaniscam.” We bring our report to you again.

Afghanistan Spy Contract Goes Sour for Pentagon
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
March 16th, 2010
Mike Furlong, a top Pentagon official, is alleged to have hired a company called International Media Ventures to supply information for drone strikes and assassinations in Afghanistan and Pakistan, according to a complaint filed by the CIA and revealed by the New York Times on March 15.

Agility Attempts to Vault Fraud Charges
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
February 1st, 2010
Agility, a Kuwait-based multi-billion dollar logistics company spawned by the U.S. invasion of Iraq, is facing criminal charges for over-billing the U.S. taxpayer on more than $8.5 billion worth of food supply contracts in the Iraq war zone. If the lawsuit is successful, the company could owe the U.S. government as much as $1 billion.

Black & Veatch's Tarakhil Power Plant: White Elephant in Kabul
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
November 19th, 2009
In a secluded valley a few miles from Kabul's international airport, $285 million in U.S. taxpayer dollars have flowed into a Black & Veatch-built power plant outside Tarakhil village. But, far from the public relations coup the project was intended to supply, the plant has run into problems with planning, cost over-runs and alleged corruption.

Spies for Hire: New Online Database of U.S. Intelligence Contractors
by Tim ShorrockSpecial to CorpWatch
November 16th, 2009
CorpWatch joins with Tim Shorrock today, the first journalist to blow the whistle on the privatization of U.S. intelligence, in releasing Spies for Hire.org, a groundbreaking database focusing on the dozens of corporations that provide classified intelligence services to the United States government.

Uranium Corporation of India Limited: Wasting Away Tribal Lands
by Moushumi BasuSpecial to CorpWatch
October 7th, 2009
In Eastern India's Jharkand State, tensions are mounting between Indigenous tribal communities and the Uranium Corporation of India Limited, or UCIL. Heavy security at a May public hearing in Jadugoda prevented many local activists and villagers from entering. But outside the hearing, activists from the Jharkhandi Organization Against Radiation (JOAR) argued their case for protecting their health and the environment from horrific impacts of radioactive contaminated waste resulting from uranium mining.

Mission Essential, Translators Expendable
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
August 11th, 2009
Ohio-based Mission Essential Personnel supplies over 2,000 translators to the Pentagon in Afghanistan, who play a critical role in protecting local and military lives. These interpreters are a key communications link. But if they are wounded or killed, they are often left to fend for themselves. This special features video of CorpWatch interviews with three Afghan whistleblowers, recorded in country in April. Click through to hear their story.

Is Halliburton Forgiven and Forgotten? Or How to Stay Out of Sight While Profiting From the War in Iraq
by Pratap ChatterjeeTomDispatch.com
June 3rd, 2009
At Halliburton's recent annual shareholders meeting in Houston, all was remarkably staid as the company celebrated its $4 billion in 2008 operating profits, a striking 22% return at a time when many companies are announcing record losses. Just three months ago, however, Halliburton didn't hesitate to pay $382 million in fines to the U.S. Department of Justice as part of the settlement of a controversial KBR gas project in Nigeria in which the company admitted to paying a $180 million bribe to government officials.

The True Cost of Chevron: An Alternative Annual Report
by Antonia Juhaszhttp://www.TrueCostofChevron.com/
May 26th, 2009
Chevron's 2008 annual report is a glossy celebration of the company's most profitable year in its history. What Chevron's annual report does not tell its shareholders is the true cost paid for those financial returns, or the global movement gaining voice and strength against the company's abuses. This jointly-produced report documents negative impacts of Chevron's operations around the globe, in stark contrast to the message sent by the company's ubiquitous "Human Energy" advertising campaign.

Mexico’s Other Crisis: Foreign Banks
by Kent PatersonSpecial to CorpWatch
May 15th, 2009
The worldwide financial crisis is hitting people in the Global South with particular venom, and disaster profiteering is alive and well. Take Mexico. While entities like Citigroup-owned Banamex get away with charging Mexican credit account-holders usurious interest rates of up to 100 percent, Banamex itself turned nearly $1 billion in profits in 2008.

Policing Afghanistan: Obama's New Strategy
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
March 23rd, 2009
A new strategy for Afghanistan and Pakistan will be unveiled by President Barack Obama this week. It plans to ramp up the training of the Afghan army and police at a cost of some $2 billion a year. Private contractor DynCorp is already lining up to bid for some of the lucrative contracts. This article provides an overview of key reports assessing the training of the Afghan police, and DynCorp's role, to date.

GEO Group, Inc.: Despite a Crashing Economy, Private Prison Firm Turns a Handsome Profit
by Erin RosaSpecial to CorpWatch
March 1st, 2009
While the nation’s economy flounders, business is booming for The GEO Group Inc., a private prison firm paid millions by the U.S. government. Behind the financial success and expansion of the for-profit security company, there are increasing charges of negligence, civil rights violations, abuse and even death.

Inheriting Halliburton's Army: What Will Obama Do With KBR?
by Pratap ChatterjeeTomDispatch.com
February 22nd, 2009
President Obama will almost certainly touch down in Baghdad and Kabul in Air Force One sometime in the coming year to meet his counterparts in Iraq and Afghanistan, and he will just as certainly pay a visit to a U.S. military base or two. Should he stay to eat with the troops, he will no less certainly choose from a menu prepared by migrant Asian workers under contract to Houston-based KBR, the former subsidiary of Halliburton.

Book Release: "Halliburton's Army: How A Well-Connected Texas Oil Company Revolutionized The Way America Makes War"
by Pratap ChatterjeeNation Books
February 3rd, 2009
In "HALLIBURTON’S ARMY: How a Well-Connected Texas Oil Company Revolutionized the Way America Makes War" (Nation Books; February 9, 2009; $26.95), muckraking journalist Pratap Chatterjee conducts a highly detailed investigation into Halliburton and its former subsidiary KBR’s activities in Kuwait and Iraq, uncovering much new information about its questionable practices and extraordinary profits.

Outsourcing Intelligence in Iraq: A CorpWatch Report on L-3/Titan, Updated December 2008 with Recommendations from Amnesty International
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
December 9th, 2008
When U.S. troops or embassy officials want to investigate Iraqis - such as interrogating prisoners, the principal intermediary is a Manhattan based-company named L-3. CorpWatch is pleased to release an updated version of this report, with recommendations from Amnesty International on human rights and other standards for translation and intelligence contracting.

One Million Weapons to Iraq; Many Go Missing
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
September 22nd, 2008
An Alabama company controlled by a billionaire Kuwaiti family is the biggest supplier of guns to Iraq. These weapons were paid for by the Pentagon which has lost track of them. A new Amnesty international report says that such unrestrained global arms trading schemes may have catastrophic human rights consequences.

Carlyle Group May Buy Major CIA Contractor: Booz Allen Hamilton
by Tim Shorrock Special to CorpWatch
March 8th, 2008
The Carlyle Group, one of the world's largest private equity funds, may soon buy out the $2 billion dollar intelligence division of Booz Allen Hamilton, one of the biggest advisors to the U.S. spy community.

QinetiQ Goes Kinetic: Top Rumsfeld Aide Wins Contracts From Spy Office He Set Up
by Tim Shorrock Special to CorpWatch
January 15th, 2008
A Pentagon office that was reprimanded by the U.S. Congress for spying on antiwar activists, has just awarded a multi-million dollar contract to QinetiQ, a British company that employs Stephen Cambone. Cambone, a former aide to Donald Rumsfeld, helped create the very office that issued the contract.

The Gunmen of Kabul
by Fariba NawaSpecial to CorpWatch
December 21st, 2007
The booming private security industry in Afghanistan has been the target of a number government raids in the last few months. One of the largest contractors -- United States Protection and Investigations (USPI) from Texas -- has been accused of corruption.

Climate Change Debate Fuels Greenwash Boom
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
December 11th, 2007
On the Indonesian island of Bali, thousands of senior government officials are negotiating a plan to slow global warming. The coal, gas and oil companies that are major producers of greenhouse gases are finally taking notice of these high-level political discussions, and many have mounted spirited public relations exercises to defend themselves.

Domestic Spying, Inc.
by Tim Shorrock Special to CorpWatch
November 27th, 2007
A new U.S. intelligence institution will allow government spy agencies to conduct broad surveillance and reconnaissance inside the country for the first time. Contractors like Boeing, BAE Systems, Harris Corporation, L-3 Communications and Science Applications International Corporation are already lining up for possible work.

The Boys from Baghdad: Iraqi Commandos Trained by U.S. Contractor
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
September 20th, 2007
Iraqi commandos are being training by USIS, a Virginia-based company that was once owned by the Carlyle Group. One of multiple "security" forces being created with $20 billion in U.S. funds, these Emergency Response Units may be stoking civil unrest as they accompany U.S. troops on raids.

Casualties of Katrina: Gulf Coast Reconstruction Two Years after the Hurricane
by Eliza Strickland and Azibuike AkabaSpecial to CorpWatch
August 27th, 2007
This CorpWatch report, by Eliza Strickland and Azibuike Akaba, tells the story of corporate malfeasance and government incompetence two years after Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans. This is our second report – Big, Easy Money by Rita J. King was the first – and it digs into a slew of new scandals.

Goodbye Houston: An Alternative Annual Report on Halliburton
May 15th, 2007
CorpWatch and its partners today released an alternative annual report on Halliburton titled: "Goodbye Houston" The new report was prepared in association with Halliburton Watch and the Oil & Gas Accountability Project.

Mystery of the Missing Meters: Accounting for Iraq's Oil Revenue
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
March 22nd, 2007
How much crude oil is Iraq actually exporting? Nobody really knows how much is potentially being stolen by corrupt officials because the contractors in charge of fixing the meters have yet to calibrate them, four years after the invasion.

This Alien Life: Privatized Prisons for Immigrants
by Deepa FernandesSpecial to CorpWatch
February 5th, 2007
In the wake of the September 11th attacks, the U.S. government invoked national security to sweep up and jail an unprecedented number of immigrants. Companies like Corrections Corporation of America and Wackenhut, have reaped the benefits.

High-Tech Healthcare in Iraq, Minus the Healthcare
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
January 8th, 2007
Almost four years after the toppling of Saddam Hussein, Iraq’s healthcare system is still a shambles. While most hospitals lack basic supplies, dozens of incomplete clinics and warehoused high-technology equipment remain as a testament to the failed U.S. experiment to reconstruct of Iraq. First in a series of CorpWatch articles.

A U.S. Fortress Rises in Baghdad: Asian Workers Trafficked to Build World's Largest Embassy
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
October 17th, 2006
Workers accuse the Kuwait contractor building the US embassy in Baghdad of smuggling low-paid South Asians into Iraq and labor trafficking. Still, the US State Department casts a blind eye on the complaints as it rushes to complete its most ambitious project ever.

Afghanistan, Inc.: A CorpWatch Investigative Report
October 6th, 2006
This weekend marks the fifth anniversary of the US invasion of Afghanistan. Fariba Nawa, an Afghan-American who returned to her native country to examine the progress of reconstruction, uncovers some examples of where the money has (and hasn’t) gone, how the system of international aid works (and doesn’t), and what it is really like in the villages and cities where outsiders are rebuilding the war-torn countryside. Click here to download the complete report.
An HTML text version of the report is also available. Listen, watch or read an interview with Fariba Nawa on Democracy Now! about reconstruction, security, and life in Afghanistan five years after the invasion.


US: Ex-Workers Testify About Halliburton
by Griff WitteWashington Post
September 19th, 2006
A Democratic Policy Committee hearing spurred by a lawsuit has renewed attention on Halliburton Co., which has come under intense scrutiny as the largest U.S. contractor in Iraq.

Disaster Profiteering on the American Gulf Coast Fact Sheet
CorpWatch Hurricane Katrina factsheet with examples of exploitation and waste by corporations hired to clean up and rebuild the Gulf Coast, one year after disaster struck.

Intelligence in Iraq: L-3 Supplies Spy Support
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
August 9th, 2006
L-3 Communications, a little-known but gigantic military contractor, provides 300 contract intelligence experts to the Pentagon in Iraq to support operations ranging from interrogation to media analysis. The secretive $426.5 million operation, which is run out of Virginia, may be a recipe for disaster, say critics.
Also see related story, A Translator's Tale, by Pratap Chatterjee.

A Translator's Tale
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
August 9th, 2006
Goran Habbeb was shot and left for dead by gunmen in Iraq for helping troops in counter-intelligence tasks. He worked for Titan, a military contractor, who supply translators to the military under a profitable multi-billion dollar contract. Almost 200 of their workers have been killed, the highest by far of any contractor in Iraq.

Pinochet's Dutch Secret
by Anton FoekSpecial to CorpWatch
July 24th, 2006
A major Dutch arms manufacturer's bankruptcy revealed a secret deal to supply weapons to General Augusto Pinochet of Chile. The man behind the scheme is now a tax exile who appears to be immune from charges of bribery or tax evasion.

Iraq After Halliburton
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
July 12th, 2006
The controversial multibillion-dollar deal with oil services giant Halliburton to provide logistical support to U.S. troops in Iraq has been canceled. What should happen next? Read our three alternative annual reports on Halliburton, to learn the real legacy of the company's incompetence and corruption.
Listen to an interview with CorpWatch's director, Pratap Chatterjee.

Border for Sale
by Joseph RicheySpecial to CorpWatch
July 5th, 2006
Five major military contractors are competing to design a system to tackle up to two million undocumented immigrants a year in the United States. Boeing, Ericsson, Lockheed, Northrop Grumman and Raytheon are working on proposals that focus on high technology rather than high fences, but ignoring some of the fundamental problems of immigration. Listen to an interview with author, Joseph Richey.

Entergy Holds New Orleans for Ransom
by Rita J. KingSpecial to Corp Watch
May 10th, 2006
Entergy, one of the largest utilities in the U.S., has enjoyed healthy profits since Hurricane Katrina. Yet its New Orleans subsidiary has filed for bankruptcy, and frightened ratepayers with visions of bills bloated to 140% of their pre-storm size. Now the Fortune 500 company is threatening to pull the plug on New Orleans if it doesn't get a $700 million-plus federal bailout it doesn't actually need.

Pink "iPods" for Democracy!
by Fariba NawaSpecial to CorpWatch
March 15th, 2006
Voice for Humanity recently sold tens of thousands of pink and silver audio players to the United States government to teach Afghan villagers about democracy. Critics say that the project was a waste of taxpayer dollars. Others say it is a perfect example of the covert "information war" conducted in the "war on terrorism."

Ports of Profit
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
February 24th, 2006
The ports of Dubai make up some of the busiest commercial hubs in the world for the "global war of terrorism." Conveniently located between the Afghanistan and Iraq, Dubai is the ideal jumping-off point for military contractors and a lucrative link in the commercial supply chain of goods and people.

Baghdad Embassy Bonanza
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
February 12th, 2006
A controversial Kuwait-based construction firm accused of exploiting employees and coercing low-paid laborers to work in war-torn Iraq against their will is now building the new $592-million U.S. embassy in Baghdad.

Listen to an interview with David Phinney about this article on CorpWatch Radio.


Gasoline Crisis in Iraq
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
February 8th, 2006
Contract mismanagement and possible corruption in the Iraqi government are fueling a crisis over international gasoline delivery into Iraq. Citing a mountain of unpaid bills, the governments of Turkey and Saudi Arabia have shut off gasoline exports to Iraq. With it's options dwindling and beleaguered Iraqis demanding fuel, Baghdad has begun to negotiate with former arch-rival, Iran.

Iraqi Port Weathers Danish Storm
by Lotte Folke Kaarsholm, Charlotte Aagaard and Osama Al-HabahbehSpecial to CorpWatch
January 31st, 2006
High-ranking officials from the United States as well as Iraq accuse the Danish shipping company Maersk of having taken advantage of the chaos of war in order to grab control of Iraq’s oil port.

From Mercenaries to Peacemakers?
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
November 29th, 2005
A grainy video (download here) of private contractors shooting at civilian cars on Iraqi streets poses a difficult question: how should the military security industry be regulated? Do they have a role in peacekeeping or are they part of the problem?

Meet the New Interrogators: Lockheed Martin
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
November 4th, 2005
Sytex, a subsidiary of Lockheed , the world's largest military contractor, has emerged as one of the biggest recruiters of private interrogators deployed to the United States-run prisons in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Blood, Sweat & Tears: Asia’s Poor Build U.S. Bases in Iraq
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
October 3rd, 2005
Thousands of low-wage Asian laborers are traveling to Iraq to work for U.S. military contractors like First Kuwaiti and Prime Projects International in the hope of sending money home to their families. Trapped and exploited under inhuman conditions, many of them are now fleeing the country to save their lives.

Big, Easy Iraqi-Style Contracts Flood New Orleans
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
September 20th, 2005
As Katrina's flood waters recede, government contractors are flowing into the Gulf Coast and reaping billions of dollars in pre-bid, limited bid, and sometimes no-bid contracts. Many of these contractors and the men who award them are the same players who bungled the reconstruction of Iraq. Deja vu all over again.

Halliburton Hearing Unearths New Abuse
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
June 27th, 2005
"Misplaced" portable military bases, thousand-dollar VCRs, and expired food are only a few of the new charges that have been brought against the most powerful military contractor in Iraq.

Marines Jail Contractors in Iraq
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
June 7th, 2005
Tension and confusion are on the rise in Iraq after a group of American security contractors were thrown in jail under suspicion for shooting at the US Marines in Fallujah.

Adding Insult to Injury
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
May 24th, 2005
Many Halliburton contractors leave Iraq with debilitating injuries and deep psychological scars. Then they return home only to find that the insurance they need to rebuild their lives is out of reach.

Houston, We Still Have A Problem
by Andrea Buffa and Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
May 16th, 2005
This week, CorpWatch publishes a special alternative annual report on Halliburton. From bribery, fraud, and corruption in Iraq, to the undermining of US government regulations that protect drinking water at home, we take a closer look at this controversial company's track record in 2004.

Contract Quagmire in Iraq
by  David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
April 27th, 2005
Rioting and threats of work stoppages at critical transportation hubs needed to rebuild the war-torn Iraq have erupted in recent months following payment disputes between contractors originally hired by the U.S.-led Coalition Provisional Authority and Iraqi officials skeptical of the billings and the CPA's handiwork.

Halliburton Bribery Scandal Deepens
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
March 29th, 2005
Halliburton officials are being investigated for taking millions of dollars in bribes while staying at a lavish seaside resort in Kuwait, in return for sub-contracts to supply the US military in Iraq. Jeff Alex Mazon is the first of these Halliburton managers to be indicted for corruption.

Driving Into Danger
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
March 29th, 2005
A grieving family is suing Halliburton for the wrongful death of Tony Johnson, a truck driver killed while en route on the deadliest day the Iraq war has seen so far. Did the company knowingly place their workers in harm's way? The Johnsons -- and the flood of families waiting to file similar lawsuits -- say they did.

An Interrogator Speaks Out
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
March 7th, 2005
A former military interrogator talks about what went wrong at Guantanamo Bay and Abu Ghraib.

Intelligence, Inc.
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
March 7th, 2005
US military interrogators -- who will work at sites ranging from Abu Ghraib to Guantanamo Bay -- must first receive training at one obscure military fort in Southern Arizona. Today, that training has been taken over by private contractors working for profit. ALSO: An Interrogator Speaks Out

Boeing Scandal Part of Deeper Problems at Pentagon
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
January 5th, 2005
Military contractors like Boeing, Halliburton and Lockheed, have become increasingly embedded with the Pentagon bureaucrats who give them lucrative work as the jailing of Darleen Druyun, a former U.S. Air Force weapons buyer, demonstrates.

Iraq Contractor Claims Immunity From Fraud Laws
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
December 23rd, 2004
A Virginia judge has been asked to decided whether or not Custer Battles, an upstart security company assigned to guard Baghdad airport, had defrauded its customers by as much as $50 million. But company lawyers are arguing that the United States government did not control the Iraqi oil money, seized during the occupation, used to pay the company.

“Contract Meals Disaster" for Iraqi Prisoners
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
December 9th, 2004
New evidence suggests that the Abu Ghraib prisoners were subjected not only to torture and psychological abuse, they were underfed, malnourished and made to eat food so bad it inspired riots. A little-known private contractor, run by an American civilian, is said to be to blame.

Kuwait Documents Allege Halliburton Bribe Scandal
by David PhinneySpecial to Corpwatch
November 11th, 2004
Newly revealed documents, dating from December 2003 and the early months of 2004, allege that Halliburton staff in Kuwait asked for kickbacks from selected contractors while undermining others who were looking for work from the multi-billion dollar contracts that the company oversees for the military occupation force in Iraq.

Agent Orange Victims Sue Monsanto
by Tom FawthropSpecial to CorpWatch
November 4th, 2004
Vietnamese Association of Victims of Agent Orange (VAVA) filed a class action law suit in a New York court, against Monsanto and 36 other manufacturers of Agent Orange.

Halliburton Hit with Multiple Lawsuits
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
October 27th, 2004
Companies working in support of U.S. troops in Iraq are hauling Houston-headquartered defense contractor, Halliburton, into U.S. federal court with claims that the company stiffed them for hundreds of millions of dollars after they provided essential services in the war effort.

Darfur Diplomacy: Enter the Contractors
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
October 21st, 2004
Rwandan and Nigerian soldiers will arrive in western Sudan this week as the first deployment of a five nation 4,500 strong peacekeeping force dispatched from the African Union headquarters in Addis Ababa to stem the violence in Darfur. Providing logistical support for the mission will be two private contractors from California, both of whom have mixed records carrying out similar enterprises in the past.

Iraq Contractor Accused of Offshore Shell Game
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
October 14th, 2004
Former managers working for Custer Battles, a high-profile private security company in Iraq, are accusing the firm of using companies in the Cayman Islands and other “tax haven” countries to fraudulently overcharge on government contracts by tens of millions of dollars.

"Rigged from the Beginning"
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
September 30th, 2004
A once secret Halliburton oil contract raked in billions long after the Army said the work would be competitively bid. As of September 2004 Halliburton billed over $2.5 billion. A Bechtel whistleblower calls the bidding process to break up the work, "a sham."

Prison Interrogation for Profit
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
September 15th, 2004
Private contractors face legal action for crimes in Abu Ghraib Employees of two high-profile defense contractors are accused of involvement in close to one third of the torture and abuse incidents cited in a recent Army investigation of Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq.

No Competition
Former Bechtel consultant portrays Halliburton bidding process as a “sham”

by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
September 14th, 2004
Sheryl Elam Tappan, former Bechtel Consultant, tells a special panel of congressional Democrats, “Officials up and down the chain of command ignored our federal laws and regulations and the procedures that normally ensure fair play.”

Teaching Democracy, Texas Style
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
July 1st, 2004

Selections, Not Elections
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
July 1st, 2004
The system od "selections, not elections" disenfranchises many local people. It was pioneered by North Carolina-based Research Triangle Institute (RTI) International, which won a $167 million United States Agency for International Development (USAID) contract,

Inventing Iraqi Democracy in North Carolina
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
July 1st, 2004
Former employees of RTI, a North Carolina company with a $167 million military contract to teach Iraqis about democracy, say the company failed in its task.

New Halliburton Whistleblowers Say Millions Wasted in Iraq
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
June 16th, 2004
According to a new GAO report and congressional testimoney from former Halliburton employees, the company encouraged waste and supported overcharging for Iraq contract work.

Give War a Chance: the Life and Times of Tim Spicer
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
June 9th, 2004
Strange or villianous, Tim Spicer's business partners over the years, have found themselves in hot water from Canada to Papua New Guinea and Zimbabwe, although he has always somehow managed to avoid prosecution.

From Embassy Hero to Racing Disgrace
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
June 9th, 2004
In order to restore the reputation of the venerable British institution, in March 2002, Phipps launched dawn raids on five National Hunt trainers--including nine-time champion Martin Pipe--to investigate whether the trainers were illegally plying the horses with the blood-boosting drug erythropoieitin.

Ex-SAS Men Cash in on Iraq Bonanza
by Pratap Chatterjee
June 9th, 2004
Many of the best-paid private security contracts in Iraq are managed by a small group of British ex-soldiers who served in the Special Air Services (SAS), an elite regiment of commandos that is considered one of the best special force units in the world.

Controversial Commando Wins Iraq Contract
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
June 9th, 2004
A new Iraq contract to create the world's largest private army goes to a company run by Tim Spicer, a former officer with an elite regiment of British commandos who has a questionable track record.

Private Contractors and Torture at Abu Ghraib
by Pratap Chatterjee and A.C. ThompsonSpecial to CorpWatch
May 7th, 2004
Two private military contractors are being investigated for their role in torture allegations at the Abu Ghraib prison, Iraq: CACI from Arlington, Virginia, and Titan of San Diego, California.

Titan's Translators in Trouble
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
May 7th, 2004
Titan corporation of San Diego, California, one of the two companies accused of complicity in the prison abuse scandal in Abu Ghraib, Iraq, is currently facing numerous federal investigations for work done in Iraq and around the world.

Private Contractors and Torture at Abu Ghraib, Iraq
by Pratap Chatterjee and A.C. ThompsonSpecial to CorpWatch
May 7th, 2004
Two private military contractors are being investigated for their role in torture allegations at the Abu Ghraib prison, Iraq: CACI from Arlington, Virginia, and Titan of San Diego, California.

Titan's Translators in Trouble
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
May 6th, 2004
Titan corporation of San Diego, California, one of the two companies accused of complicity in the prison abuse scandal in Abu Ghraib, Iraq, is currently facing numerous federal investigations for work done in Iraq and around the world.

The Spin Doctor Is In: Examining Corporate PR at Bechtel
by A.C. ThompsonSpecial to CorpWatch
April 28th, 2004
In the face of criticism over its controversial construction projects, Bechtel has taken media manipulation to the next level, employing a three-pronged approach to weaving a rosy story for the public and investors.

Mercenary Boom in Iraq Creates Tension at Home and Abroad
by Aaron GlantzSpecial to CorpWatch
March 23rd, 2004
Kurdish mercenaries are on the frontline of the burgeoning security business in Iraq, easily the fastest growing business sector in the country. Yet the boom may be heightening ethnic tensions there.

Information Warfare or Yesterday's News?
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
January 6th, 2004
Science Applications International Corporation has a contract with the Pentagon to run the Iraqi Media Network's Al Iraqiya radio and television station. But Iraqis aren't tuning in.

Umm Qasr -- From National Pride to War Booty
by David BaconSpecial to CorpWatch
December 15th, 2003
The Iraqi port of Umm Qasr -- once a crown jewel of the Iraqi economy -- is now a symbol of a new era of foreign domination. It's run by SSA, a politically-connected firm with an ugly history of anti-labor policies.

Bechtel Fails Reconstruction of Iraq's Schools
by Karim El-GawharySpecial to CorpWatch
December 2nd, 2003
Bechtel has been awarded a contract by USAID for the reconstruction of Iraq's schools, as part of a deal worth up to $1.03 billion. But the question remains whether Bechtel, like the US army, is part of the solution or part of the problem.

BAE System's Dirty Dealings
by Sasha LilleySpecial to CorpWatch
November 11th, 2003
BAE Systems has been accused of operating a $33.4 million slush fund to procure prostitutes, sports cars, and other enticements in connection with the biggest transaction in UK history -- the Al-Yamamah arms-for-oil deal with the Saudi royal family.

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Private Company Manages Daily Bombing of Korean Village
by Aaron GlantzSpecial to CorpWatch
September 27th, 2003
Six days a week, US military fighter planes drop bombs a mile from the South Korean village of Maehyang-ri. The bombing range isn't run by the US Air Force and it isn't run by the US Army. It's been privatized and is under the management of Arctic Slope World Service.

Guarding the Oil Underworld in Iraq
by Jim Vallette and Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
September 5th, 2003
When saboteurs struck the vital Kirkuk-Ceyhan pipeline in northern Iraq recently, the United States government announced that a company called Erinys would be brought in to train 6,500 Iraqis to guard oil pipelines, wellheads, and refineries.

To the Victors Go the Spoils of War
by Pratap Chatterjee and Oula Al FarawatiCorpWatch
August 8th, 2003
Critics claim that the motive for the invasion of Iraq was control of Iraqi oil. And if the bonanza in oil contracts won by giant oil companies is any indication, Washington is moving swiftly to secure access to Iraq's oil wealth once and for all.

Halliburton Milks British Nuclear Submarines for Millions
by Solomon HughesSpecial to CorpWatch
July 25th, 2003
Halliburton is giving the Brits the royal shaft by embarking on multi-million dollar privatization schemes for the British military, starting with the nuclear subs at Devonport Royal Dockyards.

Bechtel: Profiting from Destruction
by CorpWatch, Global Exchange, Public CitizenCollaborative Report
June 5th, 2003
In this collaborative report we look at Bechtel's history of operations in the water, nuclear, energy and public works sectors.

Bechtel's Water Wars
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
May 1st, 2003
In November 2001 Bechtel sued the country of Bolivia for $25 million for canceling a contract to run the water system of Cochabamba, the third largest city in the country, after local people took to the streets to protest massive price hikes for water.

Bechtel's Nuclear Nightmares
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
May 1st, 2003
In part II of this special series, we look at the environmental and human rights impacts of just a few Bechtel ventures in nuclear, water and mining.

Bechtel Wins Iraq War Contracts
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
April 24th, 2003
In this special investigative series we look at Bechtel's friends in high places, the revolving door between government and the corporate giant and some of its past boondoggles.

From Business Executive to Peace Activist
by Julie LightCorpWatch
April 17th, 2003
Warren Langley, former President of the Pacific Stock Exchange, talks with CorpWatch about his sojourn from the executive suites to activism in the streets.

Dyncorp Rent-a-Cops May Head to Post-Saddam Iraq
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
April 9th, 2003
A major military contractor - already underfire for alleged human rights violations and fraud - may get a multi-million dollar contract to police post-Saddam Iraq.

Vinnell, Brown and Root at Turkey's Incirlik Airbase
by Pratap Chatterjee and Sasha LilleySpecial to CorpWatch
March 20th, 2003
Brown and Root's role at Incirlik began on October 1, 1988 when the company won its first contract to run support services at the base in collaboration with Vinnell corporation of Virginia. The contracts also included providing services at two more minor military sites in Turkey: Ankara and Izmir.

Halliburton Makes a Killing on Iraq War
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
March 20th, 2003
CorpWatch has learned that VP Cheney's former company has a $multi-million contract servicing troops in Kuwait. This special series looks at how Halliburton profits from the Iraq war, now that bombs are falling on Baghdad.

Afghan Pipe Dreams
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
June 28th, 2002
Is the US War on Terrorism in Afghanistan really a war for a natural gas pipeline? Fossil fuel corporations and the World Bank are expressing cautious interest. Activists are concerned.

The War on Terrorism's Gravy Train
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
May 2nd, 2002
The U.S. military has always relied on private contractors for basic services, but today nearly 10 percent of the emergency U.S. army operations overseas are contracted out to unaccountable private corporations.

Trading in Disaster
by Nityanand Jayaraman and Kenny BrunoSpecial to CorpWatch
February 6th, 2002
30,000 tons of possibly contaminated steel scrap from the twin towers has been exported to India. The shipments raise serious public health concerns.

Star Wars: Protecting Globalization From Above
by Karl GrossmanSpecial to CorpWatch
January 18th, 2002
Bush's revived Star Wars program got a boost after 9-11. He's asking for $8.3 billion for a missile program from Congress, and the big defense contractors are hoping to make a fortune.

Homeland Security, Homeland Profits
by Wayne MadsenSpecial to CorpWatch
December 21st, 2001
Government spy agencies seek new ways to monitor the Internet. Civil libertarians worry about privacy while software companies stand to make billions.

Toxic Drift: Monsanto and the Drug War in Colombia
by Jeremy BigwoodSpecial to CorpWatch
June 21st, 2001
A prominent U.S. Senator and other government officials from both Washington and Bogotá stood on a Colombian mountainside above fields of lime-green coca -- the plant sacred to Andean Indians, but also the source of the troublesome drug cocaine. They were awaiting a demonstration of aerial herbicide spraying, part of the U.S. drug war in Colombia.

DynCorp in Colombia: Outsourcing the Drug War
by Jeremy BigwoodSpecial to CorpWatch
May 23rd, 2001
A U.S.-made Huey II military helicopter manned by foreigners wearing U.S. Army fatigues crash lands after being pockmarked by sustained guerrilla fire from the jungle below. Its crew members, one of them wounded, are surrounded by enemy guerrillas. Another three helicopters, this time carrying American crews, cut through the hot muggy sky.

Guarding the Multinationals
by Pratap ChatterjeeMultinational Monitor
March 1st, 1998
Alan Golacinski was White House Security Adviser, a position he rose to after 20 years in the State Department, while Michael Golovatov spent an equal number of years working for the KGB's crack commando team, known at the time as Alpha.Now both Golacinski and Golovatov report to the same bosses-Richard Bethell and Sir Alistair Morrison-two ex-Special Air Service (SAS) commandos in London. They run a profitable private company named Defense Systems Limited (DSL) in London in offices next to Buckingham Palace, working for Petrochemical companies, mining or mineral extraction companies and their subsidiaries, multinationals, banks, embassies, non-governmental organizations, national and international organizations.

Ongoing Investigations Into Haliburton as of April 2005
A comprehensive list

Top Military Contractors
The following companies are the top 10 recipients of U.S. military dollars for the 2005 fiscal year.

Groups Organizing Against War Profiteering
While countless companies are working to make a killing off of war, many organizations are have been gearing up to oppose them. They range from groups supporting Iraqi worker rights to those exposing the arms trade.

Halliburton Fact Sheet
The war in Iraq turned around the fortunes of Halliburton, Vice President Dick Cheney's former company. Learn the facts about how Halliburton has reaped a fat profit from the wars in Afghanistan, Iraq and beyond.