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Greenwash Campaign Profile
March 22nd, 2001
CorpWatch gives out bimonthly Greenwash awards to corporations that put more money, time and energy into slick PR campaigns aimed at promoting their eco-friendly images, than they do to actually protecting the environment. Nominations for these Awards come from our audience.

Alliance for a Corporate-Free UN Campaign Profile
March 22nd, 2001
For the past two years CorpWatch has led an international coalition of organizations in exposing the flawed human rights and environmental records of companies forming partnerships with the UN. CorpWatch is the Secretariat of this coalition, now known as the Alliance for a Corporate-Free UN.

Climate Justice Initiative Campaign Profile
March 22nd, 2001
Last year CorpWatch launched an initiative to redefine the global warming issue as a question of local and global justice. In November 2000, CorpWatch organized the First Climate Justice Summit in The Hague bringing representatives from communities already adversely impacted by the fossil-fuel industry from the US and Southern countries together to join the climate change debate.

Zapatistas: Bad For Business
by Martin EspinozaSpecial to CorpWatch
March 22nd, 2001
Are the Zapatistas winning the war of ideas against neoliberalism and free trade?

Peddling the E-Ticket to the Development Train
by Sarah AndersonSpecial to CorpWatch
March 8th, 2001
As both the Democratic and Republican parties jockey to win the favor of the high-tech industry, U.S. trade officials under Clinton and now under the Bush Administration have been aggressively promoting high tech's global interests by breaking down barriers to electronic commerce.

This Is What Democracy Looks Like
by Kenny BrunoSpecial to CorpWatch
January 28th, 2001
Thousands gather in Porto Alegre, Brazil to look towards a future in which corporations no longer rule.

Silence = Death: AIDS, Africa and Pharmaceuticals
by Stephen LewisToronto Globe and Mail
January 26th, 2001
While 25 million Africans are living with AIDS, Northern pharmaceutical companies and governments are turning their back on the greatest tragedy of our time according to former deputy head of UNICEF.

Is Bush Bad News for the World Bank?
by Walden BelloFocus on the Global South
January 18th, 2001
Scholar Walden Bello says a Bush presidency is bad news for the Bank and the Fund.

The Promise of Porto Alegre
by Ignacio RamonetLe Monde Diplomatique
The new century is starting in Porto Alegre. All kinds of people, each in their own ways, have been contesting and critiquing neo-liberal globalisation, and many of them will be gathering in this southern Brazilian city on 25-30 January for the first World Social Forum. This time they won't just be protesting -- as they were in Seattle, Washington, Prague and elsewhere -- against the world-wide injustices, inequalities and disasters created by the excesses of capitalism (see the article by Bernard Cassen).

Halliburton's Destructive Engagement
by Kenny BrunoSpecial to CorpWatch
October 11th, 2000
Since Dick Cheney became a candidate for Vice President, many journalists have focused on his mixed financial record as CEO of Halliburton, and his enormous retirement package. Few have investigated Dick Cheney's role in influencing foreign policy for the benefit of the company.

Prague Police Brutalize Activist Prisoner
by Julie LightSpecial to CorpWatch
September 29th, 2000
PRAGUE -- Yehoshua Tzarfati has a chilling story to tell. He came to Prague to help as a medic during this week's World Bank/IMF demonstrations.

Protestors Parade Through Prague
by Julie LightSpecial to CorpWatch
September 26th, 2000
PRAGUE -- In a day of protests that were more colorful than violent, 9,000 demonstrators surrounded Prague's Congress Center where the World Bank and IMF are holding their annual meeting.

Al's Pals: A List of Gore's Top Donors
by Bill MeslerSpecial to CorpWatch
September 8th, 2000
Gore's top donors for the 2000 presidential campaign (donation in parenthesis).

Al Gore: Friend of Corporate America
by Bill MeslerSpecial to CorpWatch
September 8th, 2000
Al Gore has raised more money than any other Democratic presidential candidate in history. But his pandering to rich and powerful comes at a cost to the public.

From Melbourne to Prague: the Struggle for a Deglobalized World
by Walden BelloFocus on the Global South
September 6th, 2000
Walden Bello delivered this speech at a series of engagements on the occasion of demonstrations against the World Economic Forum (Davos) in Melbourne, Australia, 6-10 September 2000.

The Struggle for a Deglobalized World
by Walden BelloFocus on the Global South
September 6th, 2000
In the mid-nineties, the WTO had been sold to the global public as the lynchpin of a multilateral system of economic governance that would provide the necessary rules to facilitate the growth of global trade and the spread of its beneficial effects.

Integrity in the Balance: Al Gore's Record On the Environment
by Bill MeslerSpecial to CorpWatch
August 29th, 2000
Terri Swearingen has heard enough of Al Gore's promises on the environment. ''There may be some that believe he is a premier environmentalist, but not me,'' says the forty-three year old registered nurse and mother.

Al Gore: The Other Oil Candidate
by Bill MeslerSpecial to CorpWatch
August 29th, 2000
For thousands of years, the Kitanemuk Indians made their home in the Elk Hills of central California. Come February 2001, the last of the 100 burial grounds, holy places and other archaeological sites of the Kitanemuks will be obliterated by the oil drilling of Occidental Petroleum Company.

Beyond the DNC
by Ruth ConniffSpecial to CorpWatch
August 18th, 2000
LOS ANGELES -- It's all over but the spinning. Outside the Staples Center in Los Angeles, the LAPD took snap shots if each other in the protest area where earlier in the week they clubbed and tear gassed demonstrators, as well as a few convention-goers and members of the media.

DNC: Corporate Crusaders
by Ruth ConniffSpecial to CorpWatch
August 17th, 2000
LOS ANGELES -- On Wednesday night, at the House of Blues on Sunset strip, the Edison Electric Institute, the Nuclear Energy Institute, the American Gas Association, and the National Mining Association put on a Motown bash honoring Representative John Dingell (Democrat of Michigan) under the banner ''The Motor City Takes L.A. for a Spin.''

DNC: Corporate Sponsors and Rubber Bullets
by Ruth ConniffSpecial to CorpWatch
August 15th, 2000
LOS ANGELES -- Towering over the fenced protest area outside the Staples Center in Los Angeles is a giant mural with the faces of Cesar Chavez, Eleanor and Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Martin Luther King and Robert Kennedy.

It Feels Like One Big Business Party
by Randy HayesLos Angeles Times
August 11th, 2000
Monday is the first day of the Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles, where thousands of environmental, human rights, labor and campaign finance reform advocates will gather both in the streets and at the Shadow Convention hosted by Arianna Huffington. We of Rainforest are not gathering to show our support for the Democratic Party.

Cheney's Oil Investments and the Future of Mexico's Democracy
by Martin EspinozaSpecial to CorpWatch
August 8th, 2000
MEXICO CITY -- The GOP's vice-presidential hopeful Dick Cheney once claimed that it was a damned shame the ''good lord'' didn't put the earth's most abundant oil reserves in democratic countries.

RNC: ''Don't Worry, Be Happy''
by Ruth ConniffSpecial to CorpWatch
August 1st, 2000
PHILADELPHIA -- Among the myriad corporate sponsors of the Republican Convention this year is Dale Carnegie and Associates, Inc., the self-described ''global leader in business training.''

Enron in India: The Dabhol Disaster
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
July 20th, 2000
Just before dawn on June 3, 1997, police officers forcibly entered the homes of several women in Veldur, a fishing village in western India, dragging them into waiting police vans and beating them with sticks.

George W. Bush Gets Layed
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
July 20th, 2000
This investigative report the uncovers close ties between the GOP candidate and Enron Corportations CEO.

Seeds of Resistance: Grassroots Activism vs. Biotech Agriculture
by Julie LightSpecial to CorpWatch
May 25th, 2000
SAN RAMON, CA -- About a dozen demonstrators dressed in mock biohazard suits dump food products from Safeway supermarket shelves into a plastic bin in front of the Marriott Hotel in this quiet suburban town East of San Francisco.

US: Against China PNTR
by Russell Mokhiber and Robert WeissmanFocus on the Corporation
May 22nd, 2000
The debate over whether the U.S. Congress should grant Permanent Normal Trade Relations (PNTR, formerly known as permanent most favored nation) status is about many things, but none more important than this basic question.

US: Don't Bash China
by Walden Bello and Anuradha MittalInstitute for Food and Development Policy/Food First
May 1st, 2000
The anti-China trade campaign amounts to a Faustian bargain that seeks to buy some space for US organized labor at the expense of real solidarity with workers and progressive worker and environmental movements globally against transnational capital.

Activists from the Developing World See D.C. Events as a Watershed in Global Solidarity
by Julie LightSpecial to CorpWatch
April 17th, 2000
If you ask a Mexican farmer, Indian civil servant, Filipina garment worker, Bolivian miner or South African student what structural adjustment is, chances are they would be able to explain IMF and World Bank mandated belt tightening because their lives have been touched by it.

Beyond Street Tactics
by Kenny BrunoSpecial to CorpWatch
April 17th, 2000
The final day of the World Bank/IMF protests ranged from stand offs between protestors and police, an obsession with violence on the part of the media, and excitement and hopefulness from organizers and activists.

The World Bank Takes More Than it Gives
by Julie LightCorpWatch
April 14th, 2000
Dr. Vineeta Gupta is a physician and human rights activist based in Punjab, India. She has focused her efforts on World Bank efforts to privatize healthcare in Punjab. According to Dr. Gupta, the result of World Bank policies has not been greater access to healthcare.

WTO: Watershed for Alternative Media
by Julie LightMedia Alliance
April 1st, 2000
There are watershed moments in which world events and popular perceptions of them are changed. The week of protests at the World Trade Organization meeting in Seattle last year was indisputably such a moment.

Stolen Harvest
CorpWatch
March 17th, 2000
Stolen Harvest is the story of how those who labor, those who grow foods, nature and her amazing creatures, are all literally being stolen by tremendously clever mechanisms being put in place by global corporations trying to find new markets.

Where was the Color in Seattle?
by Elizabeth (Betita) MartinezColorlines
February 1st, 2000
In the vast acreage of published analysis about the splendid victory over the World Trade Organization last November 29-December 3, it is almost impossible to find anyone wondering why the 40-50,000 demonstrators were overwhelmingly Anglo.

The Historic Significance of Seattle
by Vandana ShivaResearch Foundation for Science, Technology and Ecology
December 10th, 1999
The failure of the WTO Ministerial meeting in Seattle was a historic watershed, in more than one way. Firstly, it has demonstrated that globalisation is not an inevitable phenomena which must be accepted at all costs but a political project which can be responded to politically.

US: The Revolt of Developing Nations
by Martin KhorThird World Network
December 6th, 1999
It was an amazing week. In Seattle, the contradictions of globalization revved to a climactic conclusion. At the end, the WTO Ministerial Conference that was supposed to launch a new Round collapsed, suddenly, in almost total chaos, like a house of cards.

Greenhouse Gangsters vs. Climate Justice
by Kenny Bruno, Joshua Karliner & China BrotskyCorpWatch
November 1st, 1999
This report documents how the companies not only contribute to global warming but also use their enormous power to DENY the problem, DELAY solutions, DIVIDE their opposition, DUMP their problems in the developing world, and DUPE the public into believing the problem is solved.

The Prison Industry: Capitalist Punishment
by Julie LightCorpWatch
October 28th, 1999
The CMT Blues scandal and the host of human rights and labor issues it raises, is just the tip of the iceberg in a web of interconnected business, government and class interests which critics dub the ''prison industrial complex.''

Mumia Abu-Jamal's Statement in Response to Supreme Court's Denial for New Trial
by Mumia Abu-JamalCorpWatch
October 4th, 1999
Mumia Abu-Jamal responds to Supreme Court decision not to hear his appeal.

The Prison Industrial Complex: Crisis and Control
by Christian ParentiSpecial to CorpWatch
September 1st, 1999
The author of Lockdown America paints a chilling picture of social and economic crisis, corporate interest and the need to lock up ''disposable'' populations. Parenti also looks at the major corporate players in the prison industrial complex.

Privatizing Pain
by Mumia Abu-JamalSpecial to CorpWatch
August 26th, 1999
In this original column for CorpWatch, death-row journalist Jamal describes some of the dramatic abuses that occur when the profit motive and punishment collide.

Prison Privatization: The Bottom Line
by Alex FriedmannSpecial to CorpWatch
August 21st, 1999
This CCA prisoner describes his stint in a private lockup where the company's stock quotes were posted on the wall. His reporting on company policies landed him in hot water and then back in a state prison.

La Linea: Gender, Labor and Environmental Justice on the US-Mexico Border
by Julie LightSpecial to CorpWatch
June 30th, 1999
TECATE, Mexico -- Tecate's coat of arms dubs this Mexican town ''Baja California's Industrial Paradise.'' About 30 miles from Tijuana, the city is home to the Tecate brewery and also houses an industrial park filled with assembly plants, or maquiladoras. This ''industrial paradise'' is one of several Mexican border boomtowns that is part of a global production system.

Engendering Change
by Julie LightSpecial to CorpWatch
June 26th, 1999
For women working in Mexican assembly plants, known as maquiladoras, insisting on their legal rights takes what are colloquially referred to as cojones. It indicates that Mexico's low wage feminine labor force may not be as docile as foreign employers would like to believe. It also is a harbinger of an incipient movement inside Mexico's expanding export-processing sector.

Tijuana Police Defy Court Protection of Maquiladora Strike
by David BaconSpecial to CorpWatch
May 16th, 1999
TIJUANA -- For two weeks, Tijuana has teetered on the brink of official lawlessness, as city and state police continue to defy Baja California's legal system. Raul Ramirez, member of the Baja California Academy of Human Rights, warned last week that ''the state is in danger of violating the Constitution and the Federal Labor Law... as it succumbs to the temptation to use force.''

MEXICO: Standing up for Health Rights on the Job
Special to CorpWatch
May 1st, 1999
First hand accounts of two workers who sued a San Diego-based medical manufacturer after a workplace accident.

MEXICO: University Professors Photos Draw the Wrath of Border Industrialists
by Julie LightSpecial to CorpWatch
April 29th, 1999
It wasn't just the politically provocative photographs that got Fred Lonidier's exhibit at Tijuana's public university taken down. It was the fact that he had the audacity to leaflet maquiladora workers outside the factory gates and invite them to the gallery that got his show yanked.

A Perilous Partnership
by Joshua Karliner, John Cavanagh, Phyllis Bennis and Ward MorehouseCorpWatch, IPS and CIPA
March 16th, 1999
In a sharp detour from its mission of serving the world's poor, a key UN agency, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), has solicited funds from global corporations with tarnished records on human rights, labor and the environment. A Perilous Partnership takes a hard look at this new initiative to build corporate partnerships in the United Nations.

MEXICO: Miners' Strike Broken in Revolutionary Cananea
by David BaconSpecial to CorpWatch
March 12th, 1999
In the mile-high mountains of the Sonora desert, just 25 miles south of the border between Arizona and Mexico, over two thousand miners have been locked in a bitter industrial war since mid-November. Here Grupo Mexico operates North America's oldest, and one of the world's largest copper mines -- Cananea -- in a town which has been a symbol of anti-government insurrection for almost 100 years.

Smoke and Mirrors
by Michael BelliveauCorpWatch
October 1st, 1998
Almost a year after governments agreed to the Kyoto Protocol on climate change, a growing number of environmentalists are sounding the alarm on the Treaty's call for a system of global emissions trading.

Masked Racism: Reflections on the Prison Industrial Complex
by Angela Y. DavisColorLines
September 1st, 1998
Long time scholar and activist Davis explains that locking up vast numbers of poor people of color "has literally become big business." She examines how corporate interest and institutional racism intersect.

Corporate-Sponsored Public Schools
Applied Research Center
July 8th, 1998
Here is a fact sheet on the education industry prepared by the Applied Research Center (ARC). It is an excellent resource listing a ''who's who'' of the for-profit education world.

Race and Classroom: The Corporate Connection
CorpWatch
July 8th, 1998
Activist and researcher Libero Della Piana talks about the history of institutional racism in U.S. schools and how it leaves children of color vulnerable to corporate intervention in the classroom.

Giving Kids the Business
CorpWatch
July 8th, 1998
CorpWatch discusses industry's efforts to cash in on public schools with Professor Molnar, Author of Giving Kids the Business and director of the Center for the Analysis of Commercialism in Education.

A Local Battle Highlights the National Debate Over EMOs
by Julie LightSpecial to CorpWatch
July 8th, 1998
CorpWatch editor Julie Light reports on a pitched battle for the future of a San Francisco school. The players? The Edison Corporation, the local school board, parents, teachers and students.

The Education Industry: The Corporate Takeover of Public Schools
by Julie LightCorpWatch
July 8th, 1998
Education in the U.S. has become big business. The ''education industry,'' a term coined by EduVentures, an investment banking firm, is estimated to be worth between $630 and $680 billion in the United States. The stock value of 30 publicly traded educational companies is growing twice as fast as the Dow Jones Average.

Microsoft and Internet Development
CorpWatch
May 6th, 1998
What do computer programmers think about Microsoft's role in the development of the Internet, and the social implications of the underlying technical issues? We asked Harry Hochheiser, an Internet software developer and board member of Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility for his perspective.

Defying a Microsoft World View
CorpWatch
May 6th, 1998
Audrie Krause is the founder and executive director of NetAction. When this interview took place in January 1998, Microsoft had recently agreed under threat of a contempt of court citation in the US Department of Justice antitrust lawsuit, to allow personal computer manufacturers who install Windows to remove the Internet Explorer icon from the desktop.

Noam Chomsky on Microsoft and Corporate Control of the Internet
CorpWatch
May 6th, 1998
CorpWatch's Anna Couey and Joshua Karliner caught up with Noam Chomsky by telephone at his home in the Boston area to ask him about Microsoft and Bill Gates. The following is a transcript of our far ranging conversation.

US: Oregon's Prison Slaveocracy
by Dan PensPrison Legal News
May 1st, 1998
When "get tough" voter measures requiring inmates to work for free, undermined the Oregon State Constitution, lawmakers simply amended it. Prison Legal News co-editor and inmate Pens looks at the impacts on prisoner and labor rights.

Philippine Greens Protest the Visit of Bill Gates
by Roberto VerzolaThe Philippine Greens
March 20th, 1998
A denunciation of Microsoft for pressuring the Philippine government to establish special laws and law enforcement forces to protect the corporation's software at the expense of educating Philippine students.

Guarding the Multinationals
by Pratap ChatterjeeMultinational Monitor
March 1st, 1998
Alan Golacinski was White House Security Adviser, a position he rose to after 20 years in the State Department, while Michael Golovatov spent an equal number of years working for the KGB's crack commando team, known at the time as Alpha.Now both Golacinski and Golovatov report to the same bosses-Richard Bethell and Sir Alistair Morrison-two ex-Special Air Service (SAS) commandos in London. They run a profitable private company named Defense Systems Limited (DSL) in London in offices next to Buckingham Palace, working for Petrochemical companies, mining or mineral extraction companies and their subsidiaries, multinationals, banks, embassies, non-governmental organizations, national and international organizations.

Some Trends in the Education Industry
Applied Research Center
December 1st, 1997
Here is a comparative chart listing some trends in the education industry prepared by the Applied Research Center.

MITSUBISHI: The Most Environmentally Destructive Corporate Force on Earth
by Joshua KarlinerCorpWatch
December 1st, 1997
The best known, most prestigious, and largest keiretsu, is the Mitsubishi Group of companies. Given the size and reach of its diverse activities, and due to the fact that it is more heavily focused in polluting industrial sectors than other keiretsu, the Mitsubishi Group may well be the single most environmentally destructive corporate force on Earth.

VIETNAM: Smoke From a Hired Gun
by Dara O'RourkeTransnational Resource and Action Center (TRAC)
November 10th, 1997
TRAC is pleased to be able to shed some light on this subject by releasing the first audit of this kind ever to be made public: a confidential Ernst and Young assessment of the Tae Kwang Vina plant, a factory which employs 9,200 workers who produce 400,000 pairs of shoes a month exclusively for Nike in Vietnam.

Towards a Democratic Media System
CorpWatch
October 1st, 1997
Robert W. McChesney is Associate Professor of Journalism and Mass Communications at the University of Wisconsin, Madison talks about corporate control of the Internet in this CorpWatch interview.

CorpWatch Interviews Lora Jo Foo
CorpWatch
September 22nd, 1997
Here is an interview with Laura Jo Foo of the Asian Law Caucus and President of Sweatshop Watch on the issue of a Living Wage.

Clinton's New ''No Sweatshop'' Agreement
by Tim ConnorCommunity Aid Abroad
September 22nd, 1997
In April this year, with much fanfare, US President Bill Clinton announced the introduction of a new ''No Sweatshop'' Code of Conduct for US Apparel and Footwear companies. The code is voluntary, but high profile companies like Nike Inc., Reebok International Ltd. and Liz Claiborne Inc. were among the ten initial signatories. These companies agreed that a set of minimum standards for working conditions in factories would be adhered to in the production of their goods -- wherever that production occurs.

Global Tobacco Control Policy Framework
San Francisco Tobacco Free Coalition
June 30th, 1997
As 33% of San Franciscans are immigrants, the Coalition believes that it must think globally and act locally in the development of a Global Tobacco Control Policy Framework.

Dr. Stan Glantz on The Tobacco Settlement
CorpWatch
June 30th, 1997
To get some perspective on the deal negotiated with the tobacco industry CorpWatch spoke with Stanton Glantz, Professor of Medicine at the University of California at San Francisco. Glantz, a long-time tobacco crusader, is the author of the Cigarette Papers, the published version of internal documents leaked to him from the Brown and Williamson tobacco corporation.

Tobacco's Global Ghettos: Big Tobacco Targets The World's Poor
by Carol McGruderSan Francisco African American Tobacco Free Project
June 30th, 1997
With daily reportage and media coverage chronicling the first chinks in the once seemingly impenetrable armor of Big Tobacco, the general public might get the very erroneous impression that Big Tobacco is going down for the count. Nothing could be further from the truth. To the average person the $300-$400 billion dollar ''global'' settlement that is currently being bandied about seems like an awful lot of money. To those of us in the tobacco control business, we know it is but a drop in the ocean to Big Tobacco, and a small price to pay to ensure that they will be able to continue business as usual in the rest of the world. The Tobacco Industry won't even flinch as they write the check.

Tobacco Industry Fact Sheet
INFACT
June 30th, 1997
The following tobacco industry facts were excerpted with permission from INFACT's web site. INFACT is a national grassroots corporate watchdog organization founded in 1977.

No Butts About It, Tobacco Kills
CorpWatch, San Francisco Tobacco Free Coalition, and San Francisco Tobacco Free Project
June 30th, 1997
The following is excerpted from the World Health Organization's Tobacco Use: A Public Health Disaster.

Dr. Judith Mackay Speaks About Tobacco and Globalization
by Dr. Judith M. MackaySan Francisco's Forum On Global Tobacco Control Policies
May 19th, 1997
Excerpted from the San Francisco's Forum On Global Tobacco Control Policies. Dr. Judith Mackay looks at the ''New Opium War.''

Tom Beanal's Speech at Loyola University in New Orleans
Project Underground
May 19th, 1997
On May 23, 1996, Mr. Tom Beanal, leader of the Amungme Tribal Council and principal in a $6 billion suit against Freeport-McMoRan, spoke at Loyola University, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA.

Freeport McMoRan's Corporate Profile
Project Underground
May 19th, 1997
Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold Inc, headquartered in New Orleans, is one of the world's largest and lowest cost copper and gold producers, from its Grasberg mine in Irian Jaya. In 1996 it was regarded as one of the ten worst corporations by the Multinational Monitor magazine.

Global Gold Rush
by Joshua KarlinerCorpWatch
May 19th, 1997
Gold is an intoxicating substance. Witness the rapidity with which investors threw their money into a relatively obscure Canadian mining corporation called Bre-X, when that company claimed to have discovered the largest single deposit of the metal in history.

Pete Wilson (Honorary Baron)
Political Ecology Group
March 31st, 1997
Wilson's support for methyl bromide has certainly helped make him a powerful economic force in the political arena.

Trical Inc.
Political Ecology Group
March 31st, 1997
A largely mysterious entity, TriCal is owned and operated by its President, Dean Storkan. Together with some of his top lieutenants, Roger Hruby, Hank Maze and Tom Duafala, Storkan operates a series of thirteen related corporations in which he has significant, if not controlling financial interests.

Assorted and Sundry Barons
Political Ecology Group
March 31st, 1997
Various other corporations and industry associations participate in the transnational effort to perpetuate the use of the Class I Toxin and Class I ozone depleter, methyl bromide.

Sun-Diamond Growers of California
Political Ecology Group
March 31st, 1997
The most blatent case of the Bromide Barons attempting to underine the democratic process with their financial influence is that of Sun-Diamond Growers of California. A large agricultural concern that uses methyl bromide to grow young fruit trees and to fumigate stored fruit and nuts.

Methyl Bromide Working Group
Political Ecology Group
March 31st, 1997
Led by the Methyl Bromide Working Group (MBWG) and its chief lobbyist Peter G. Sparber, the Barons of Bromide are working on a number of fronts to undermine the U.S. Clean Air Act and thus to perpetuate the use of methyl bromide indefinitely.

Methyl Bromide Global Coalition
Political Ecology Group
March 31st, 1997
The Methyl Bromide Global Coalition (MBGC) has exerted significant influence on all aspects of the methyl bromide debate, inserting itself as a central player in international scientific panels, diplomatic negotiations and public pronouncements on the issue.

Dead Sea Bromine Group
Political Ecology Group
March 31st, 1997
Dead Sea Bromine produces as much as 30 percent of world output of methyl bromide, which it exports to Europe, Africa, the United States and China. However, very little information is available on this Israeli transnational corporation.

The Bromide Barons
Political Ecology Group
March 31st, 1997
A handful of corporations control the methyl bromide industry. Enter the realm of the Bromide Barons.

Albemarle Corporation
Political Ecology Group
March 31st, 1997
Today the Albemarle Corporation is one of the top three producers of methyl bromide in the world. Founded in 1887 to produce blotting papers for fountain pens, Albemarle stayed a paper products company for many years.

First Hand Experience
by Alba MoralesPolitical Ecology Group
March 31st, 1997
Photos and words from farm workers and communities neighboring methyl bromide injected fields.

Push Back the Poison: Ban Methyl Bromide
by Joshua KarlinerCorpWatch
March 31st, 1997
Methyl bromide is a silent killer. Colorless and odorless, it is highly toxic to a wide spectrum of organisms, including human beings. It would be fast on its way out today if it weren't for a small handful of corporations, industry associations and elected officials which have worked stealthily and assiduously to keep this deadly product on the market and in the field.

Farm Workers on the Front Lines
CorpWatch
March 31st, 1997
CorpWatch talks with Dolores Huerta of the United Farm Workers about their long history of working to ban dangerous pesticides.

Profiting from Punishment
by Paul WrightPrison Labor News
March 1st, 1997
The co-editor of Prison Legal News, a Washington State prisoner himself, Wright reports on private companies, like Boeing, that are making out like bandits by using prison labor.

Organizing the High Tech Industry
CorpWatch
February 10th, 1997
CorpWatch interviews John Barton, Organizing Coordinator, Building Service Division, of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), and links up with other groups organizing for worker health and safety.

International Activist Profile: Ryoichi Terada
Campaign for Responsible Technology
February 10th, 1997
Ryoichi Terada, Professor of the Environment, Tsuru University, Tokyo confronts the high tech industry's ground water contamination in Japan.

The Globalization of High Tech
by Carlos PlazolaCampaign for Responsible Technology
February 10th, 1997
High-tech electronics industry representatives in the Silicon Valley are finally admitting that their facilities pose significant risks to surrounding communities (of course, they admitted this for liability and permit renewal purposes). A recent article in the San Jose Mercury News (6/18/96) described the struggle between LSI Logic and a neighboring Muslim school.

The Environmental Cost of Computers
Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition
February 10th, 1997
Here is our "clickable computer." Click on any of these four computer parts to find out their environmental impact.

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AUSTRALIA: Billionaire Pratt Faces Price-Fixing Charge
by Chris NoonForbes

Ongoing Investigations Into Haliburton as of April 2005
A comprehensive list

Top Military Contractors
The following companies are the top 10 recipients of U.S. military dollars for the 2005 fiscal year.

Groups Organizing Against War Profiteering
While countless companies are working to make a killing off of war, many organizations are have been gearing up to oppose them. They range from groups supporting Iraqi worker rights to those exposing the arms trade.

Halliburton Fact Sheet
The war in Iraq turned around the fortunes of Halliburton, Vice President Dick Cheney's former company. Learn the facts about how Halliburton has reaped a fat profit from the wars in Afghanistan, Iraq and beyond.

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