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CorpWatch Exclusives : Displaying 438-457 of 717


'Tis the Season for Shareholder Activism
by Jan FrelSpecial to CorpWatch
May 4th, 2005
Every spring, activists and investors attend annual general meetings to protest and meet face-to-face with CEOs and corporate boards. The goal is to place their agendas -- on everything from the environment to labor practices -- front and center.

Contract Quagmire in Iraq
by  David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
April 27th, 2005
Rioting and threats of work stoppages at critical transportation hubs needed to rebuild the war-torn Iraq have erupted in recent months following payment disputes between contractors originally hired by the U.S.-led Coalition Provisional Authority and Iraqi officials skeptical of the billings and the CPA's handiwork.

Meat Packer's Union on the Chopping Block
by Sasha LilleySpecial to CorpWatch
April 18th, 2005
Today's meat packing industry relies increasingly on high-speed, treacherous disassembly lines. Perhaps that's why Tyson Foods, Inc. -- a giant in a flourishing industry -- is working to take apart a union that prioritizes safety over speed.

University, Inc.
by Jennifer BordenSpecial to CorpWatch
April 11th, 2005
From research patents to high-stakes partnerships, Jennifer Washburn spent years researching the links between industry and the American University. In this exclusive interview with CorpWatch's Jennifer Borden, Washburn talks about what she found, why it matters and what you can do about it.

Bringing Business Back Ashore
by Lucy KomisarSpecial to CorpWatch
April 4th, 2005
A new breed of leadership is working to make Buenos Aires, Argentina, a local, transparent economy and a model for the rest of the world.

Halliburton Bribery Scandal Deepens
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
March 29th, 2005
Halliburton officials are being investigated for taking millions of dollars in bribes while staying at a lavish seaside resort in Kuwait, in return for sub-contracts to supply the US military in Iraq. Jeff Alex Mazon is the first of these Halliburton managers to be indicted for corruption.

Driving Into Danger
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
March 29th, 2005
A grieving family is suing Halliburton for the wrongful death of Tony Johnson, a truck driver killed while en route on the deadliest day the Iraq war has seen so far. Did the company knowingly place their workers in harm's way? The Johnsons -- and the flood of families waiting to file similar lawsuits -- say they did.

Food Giants on the Run
by Michele SimonSpecial to CorpWatch
March 21st, 2005
The food industry is working with politicians across the United States to rewrite laws in order to shield themselves from lawsuits based on obesity and related health problems.

BlueLinx Buys Illegal Indonesian Timber
by Steve SlatterySpecial to CorpWatch
March 14th, 2005
JP Morgan Chase and BlueLinx linked to illegal logging of endangered Indonesia forests.

Fighting the Big Gunns in Tasmania
by Tom PriceSpecial to CorpWatch
March 14th, 2005
The war between the world's largest woodchip exporter, Gunns Limited, and the Australian conservation community has been raging for decades. But the company's recent efforts to silence Tasmanian activists through lawsuits could earn them millions and set a very dangerous precedent. ALSO: BlueLinx Buys Illegal Indonesian Timber

An Interrogator Speaks Out
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
March 7th, 2005
A former military interrogator talks about what went wrong at Guantanamo Bay and Abu Ghraib.

Intelligence, Inc.
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
March 7th, 2005
US military interrogators -- who will work at sites ranging from Abu Ghraib to Guantanamo Bay -- must first receive training at one obscure military fort in Southern Arizona. Today, that training has been taken over by private contractors working for profit. ALSO: An Interrogator Speaks Out

Carbon: Under Kyoto, a Hot Commodity
by Daphne WyshamSpecial to CorpWatch
February 18th, 2005
Are World Bank-funded efforts to compensate for corporate emissions sustainable? Or will they affect poor communities disproportionately?

The Carbon Brokers
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
February 18th, 2005
Traders are gearing up for a new futures market. These new carbon exchanges promise billions in potential profit, but will they save the planet?

Spinning Media for Government
by Chris RaphaelSpecial to CorpWatch
February 10th, 2005
Public relations giant Omnicom has received almost a quarter of a billion dollars in contracts from the federal government for public relations work. At least one has been labeled "covert propaganda," another involved paying off a journalist and opinion-maker.

Two World Forums, Two Visions
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
January 27th, 2005
While the world's biggest CEOs and politicians gather in Davos, Switzerland to network and negotiate, activists and NGO-workers meet halfway around the world in Porto Alegre, Brazil to imagine other, more humanity-focused possibilities.

Exporting Cures, Importing Misery
by By Stan CoxAlterNet
January 19th, 2005
The Kazipally industrial area once good farm country now accounts for more than one-third of India's pharmaceutical industry, meaning skyrocketing rates of cancer, heart disease and birth defects for its residents.

Egyptian Asbestos Workers Dying of Cancer
by Aaron Glantz, Special to CorpWatch
January 13th, 2005
Workers at Aura-Misr, a Spanish-Egyptian asbestos company in Cairo, have been laid off since Christmas, after a ban on asbestos took effect in the country. Many of the fired workers have been diagnosed with cancer and they worry that other workers may soon fall ill and die also.

Boeing Scandal Part of Deeper Problems at Pentagon
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
January 5th, 2005
Military contractors like Boeing, Halliburton and Lockheed, have become increasingly embedded with the Pentagon bureaucrats who give them lucrative work as the jailing of Darleen Druyun, a former U.S. Air Force weapons buyer, demonstrates.

Iraq Contractor Claims Immunity From Fraud Laws
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
December 23rd, 2004
A Virginia judge has been asked to decided whether or not Custer Battles, an upstart security company assigned to guard Baghdad airport, had defrauded its customers by as much as $50 million. But company lawyers are arguing that the United States government did not control the Iraqi oil money, seized during the occupation, used to pay the company.

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