Contact l Sitemap

home industries issues reasearch weblog press

Home

CorpWatch Exclusives : Displaying 392-411 of 710


Iraq After Halliburton
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
July 12th, 2006
The controversial multibillion-dollar deal with oil services giant Halliburton to provide logistical support to U.S. troops in Iraq has been canceled. What should happen next? Read our three alternative annual reports on Halliburton, to learn the real legacy of the company's incompetence and corruption.
Listen to an interview with CorpWatch's director, Pratap Chatterjee.

Border for Sale
by Joseph RicheySpecial to CorpWatch
July 5th, 2006
Five major military contractors are competing to design a system to tackle up to two million undocumented immigrants a year in the United States. Boeing, Ericsson, Lockheed, Northrop Grumman and Raytheon are working on proposals that focus on high technology rather than high fences, but ignoring some of the fundamental problems of immigration. Listen to an interview with author, Joseph Richey.

A Proxy Battle: Shareholders vs. CEOs
by Kevin KelleherSpecial to CorpWatch
June 13th, 2006
Earnest shareholder resolutions presented at company annual general meetings on everything from human rights to executive compensation are routinely shot down in flames. But shareholder resolutions may have an effect, even in defeat.

Green Fuel's Dirty Secret
by Sasha LilleySpecial to CorpWatch
June 1st, 2006
Ethanol made from corn has been touted as the "green fuel" of the future. Archer Daniels Midland, the largest U.S. producer of ethanol, stands to make a fortune from environmentally conscious car drivers. But is ethanol really as environmentally clean as it is hyped to be? Listen to an interview with Sasha Lilley on CorpWatch Radio. 

Stolen for Steel: Tata Takes Tribal Lands in India
by Nityanand JayaramanSpecial to CorpWatch
May 24th, 2006
The Tata Group, one of India's biggest and oldest multinationals, has taken over tribal land to build an enormous steel plant in Orissa. A clash between the traditional owners of the land and the police has resulted in numerous injuries and deaths, calling into the question the prestigious family-owned company's philanthropic image.

Entergy Holds New Orleans for Ransom
by Rita J. KingSpecial to Corp Watch
May 10th, 2006
Entergy, one of the largest utilities in the U.S., has enjoyed healthy profits since Hurricane Katrina. Yet its New Orleans subsidiary has filed for bankruptcy, and frightened ratepayers with visions of bills bloated to 140% of their pre-storm size. Now the Fortune 500 company is threatening to pull the plug on New Orleans if it doesn't get a $700 million-plus federal bailout it doesn't actually need.

Target: Wal-Mart Lite
by Kari LydersenSpecial to CorpWatch
April 20th, 2006
Shopping in a Target store, you know you’re not in Wal-Mart. But, critics say that in terms of working conditions, sweatshop-style foreign suppliers, and effects on local retail communities, big box Target stores are very much like Wal-Mart, just in a prettier package.

Australia Reaps Iraqi Harvest
by Marc MoncriefSpecial to CorpWatch
April 4th, 2006
United Nations sanctions against Saddam Hussein may have failed to end his regime but they succeeded in enriching both the Iraqi dictator and corporations able to manipulate the scandal-ridden world body's Oil-for-Food program. Among the profiteers was the Australian Wheat Board, a former state-owned monopoly, which funneled over $200 million into Saddam's coffers even as the “Coalition of the Willing” was preparing for invasion.

Pink "iPods" for Democracy!
by Fariba NawaSpecial to CorpWatch
March 15th, 2006
Voice for Humanity recently sold tens of thousands of pink and silver audio players to the United States government to teach Afghan villagers about democracy. Critics say that the project was a waste of taxpayer dollars. Others say it is a perfect example of the covert "information war" conducted in the "war on terrorism."

Happy Meals, Unhappy Workers
by Aaron Glantz and Ngoc NguyenSpecial to CorpWatch
March 6th, 2006
Vietnamese workers earn less than $2 a day making stuffed animals and Happy Meal toys for U.S. consumers. An ongoing series of wildcat strikes this winter has forced the government to raise wages to prevent factories from moving to other countries.

Listen to an interview about this article with Aaron Glantz on CorpWatch Radio.


Ports of Profit
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
February 24th, 2006
The ports of Dubai make up some of the busiest commercial hubs in the world for the "global war of terrorism." Conveniently located between the Afghanistan and Iraq, Dubai is the ideal jumping-off point for military contractors and a lucrative link in the commercial supply chain of goods and people.

Baghdad Embassy Bonanza
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
February 12th, 2006
A controversial Kuwait-based construction firm accused of exploiting employees and coercing low-paid laborers to work in war-torn Iraq against their will is now building the new $592-million U.S. embassy in Baghdad.

Listen to an interview with David Phinney about this article on CorpWatch Radio.


Gasoline Crisis in Iraq
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
February 8th, 2006
Contract mismanagement and possible corruption in the Iraqi government are fueling a crisis over international gasoline delivery into Iraq. Citing a mountain of unpaid bills, the governments of Turkey and Saudi Arabia have shut off gasoline exports to Iraq. With it's options dwindling and beleaguered Iraqis demanding fuel, Baghdad has begun to negotiate with former arch-rival, Iran.

Iraqi Port Weathers Danish Storm
by Lotte Folke Kaarsholm, Charlotte Aagaard and Osama Al-HabahbehSpecial to CorpWatch
January 31st, 2006
High-ranking officials from the United States as well as Iraq accuse the Danish shipping company Maersk of having taken advantage of the chaos of war in order to grab control of Iraq’s oil port.

Uruguay: Pulp Factions: Uruguay’s Environmentalists v. Big Paper
by Raúl PierriSpecial to CorpWatch
January 16th, 2006
Massive monoculture plantations have begun a cascade of changes to Uruguay’s economy, environment and culture. Now, the foreign corporations that grow the trees are escalating the process by building massive pulp mills that threatening lives and livelihoods.

HAITI: Haiti Telecom Kickbacks Tarnish Aristide
by Lucy KomisarSpecial to CorpWatch
December 29th, 2005
In two lawsuits, politically connected U.S. telecom companies have been accused of kickbacks to Former President Aristide and his associates.

Coca Farmer Wins Bolivian Election: New President to Challenge Multinationals
by Anton FoekSpecial to CorpWatch
December 28th, 2005
Evo Morales, an Aymara Indian who grew up in childhood poverty, has won the Bolivian presidential elections. He is part of a wave of leftists taking power in Latin America and challenging multinational corporations.

Some Strings Attached: Cotton, Farm subsidies tie up global trade talks
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
December 13th, 2005
West African cotton farmers are among those hardest hit by government subsidized corporate agriculture. This week in Hong Kong, trade ministers from the 148 members of the World Trade Organization meet to discusss this and other global free trade issues.

From Mercenaries to Peacemakers?
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
November 29th, 2005
A grainy video (download here) of private contractors shooting at civilian cars on Iraqi streets poses a difficult question: how should the military security industry be regulated? Do they have a role in peacekeeping or are they part of the problem?

Vedanta Undermines Indian Communities
by Nityanand JayaramanSpecial to Corpwatch
November 15th, 2005
Vedanta, a fast growing British mining and aluminium production company founded by a billionaire expatriate Bombay businessman, threatens communities in India with environmental degradation and widespread pollution.

Displaying 392-411 of 710  
< Prev  Next >> 
« First Page Last Page » 
« Show Complete List »