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CorpWatch Exclusives : Displaying 171-470 of 604


Spies in Africa’s Skies: New Contractors for the Pentagon
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
June 18th, 2012
Sierra Nevada Corporation from Sparks, Nevada, and R-4, Inc. from Eatontown, New Jersey - are two companies at the forefront of the covert war in Africa, where they operate small Swiss aircraft to spy on behalf of the U.S. Special Operations Command.

Forgiving Siemens: Unraveling a Tangled Tale of German Corruption in Greece
by Lena Mavraka and Vasilis PapatheodorouSpecial to CorpWatch
June 11th, 2012
To understand the pervasive corruption in Greek politics, it is necessary to examine the company that has probably paid the biggest bribes to both major parties: Siemens from Munich, Germany, a company with contracts in practically every ministry from culture to telecommunications.

Coffee Colonialism: Olam Plantation Displaces Lao Farmers
by Beaumont SmithSpecial to CorpWatch
June 4th, 2012
Olam International, a Singapore based multinational, is growing coffee for export in Paksong, southern Laos. The land for the plantation was seized by Sonesay Siphandone, the district governor, from the upland Nha Huen/Yahern community who have been left without food to eat.

Faking Happiness: Activists Strike Back at Vedanta Ad Campaign
by Freny ManeckshaCorpWatch Blog
May 30th, 2012
Vedanta Resources, a UK based mining and metals company with numerous projects in India, is attempting to claim to be social responsible via a huge advertising campaign. However activists have struck back by effectively using social media tools to counter Vedanta's claims.

CIA "Rendition" Contractors Data Cache To Be Released
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
May 22nd, 2012
Details of 6,500 "extraordinary rendition" flights conducted by CIA contractors to transport over 1,100 victims to and from prison sites around the world are to be released by NGOs Reprieve Access Info Europe working in collaboration with Kent University and Kingston University in the UK.

CorpWatch 2010-2011 Annual Report: Occupying the Web for 16 Years!
May 15th, 2012
One year ago today, the Occupy movement was born when Los Indignados (The Outraged) gathered in Puerta del Sol square in Madrid to protest big business and government failure to respond to the economic crisis. Here is our report to you about what CorpWatch did to Occupy our small part of the World Wide Web and report on the outrageous stories of corporate malfeasance.

Privatizing Asylum Housing: Serco and G4S Get UK Contracts
by Lily SmithCorpWatch Blog
May 8th, 2012
G4S and Serco – two private security contractors - have just been awarded multi-million pound contracts by the UK Borders Authority to provide housing to asylum seekers, edging out charities for the work. Activists are protesting, saying that G4S has a history of abusing immigrants and providing poor quality housing.

Sweatships at Sea: Carnival Cruises Pay Below International Standards
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
May 1st, 2012
Carnival Cruise staff on UK ships are paid $1.20 an hour or $400 a month in basic wages, according to the Guardian newspaper. These workers lose their tips, ie roughly 15 percent of wages, unless they get at least a 92 percent favorable rating from customers.

Cashing in on Terrorism
by Anna FeigenbaumCorpWatch Blog
April 24th, 2012
"Is Rioting a Form of Urban Terrorism?" The headline for a press release was a provocative introduction to the annual Counter Terror Expo in Olympia, London, which opens this week. (April 25 & 26) Eight thousand visitors are expected to descend on 400 exhibitions of counter-terrorism technologies and services.

Glencore Allegedly Buys Copper From Ten Year Old Miners
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
April 17th, 2012
Children as young as ten in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, dig for cobalt and copper which they then sell to Switzerland-based Glencore, the world’s largest commodities company, according to a new BBC investigation.

Renewable Energy Projects Generate Opposition in Puerto Rico
by Carmelo Ruiz-MarreroCorpWatch Blog
April 8th, 2012
Puerto Rican citizen groups are protesting two renewable energy projects: a 30 megawatt solar energy project in Yabucoa by Western Wind Energy corporation from Vancouver and a 75 megawatt windmill array in Santa Isabel by Pattern Energy of San Francisco. The reason: these projects will threaten scarce farm land on the food dependent island.

Chiquita Banana To Face Colombia Torture Claim
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
March 30th, 2012
Chiquita, the global banana producer, was ordered to face a federal court over their role in paying off right wing death squads in Colombia that are alleged to have used “random and targeted violence” against villagers in exchange for financial assistance and access to Chiquita’s private port.

Emerald Energy Exploits Colombian Andes
by Elias CabreraSpecial to CorpWatch
March 18th, 2012
Emerald Energy, a UK company owned by Sinochem of China, is exploring for oil in the eastern Colombian Andes in the high altitude tropical mountain tundra ecosystem known as páramo. Local communities say that the company's underground explosions have caused landslides and ground collapses that have destroyed homes, crops and contaminated the local water supply.

Thorny Business: Ethiopian Rose Exports To Europe
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch Blog
March 5th, 2012
Karuturi Global and Saudi Star have leased thousands of hectares of land from the Ethiopian government for agricultural development. Critics says these projects have displaced traditional farmers and subsistence crops.

Green Deserts: The Palm Oil Conflict
by Melody KempSpecial to CorpWatch
February 16th, 2012
Wilmar of Singapore, the world’s biggest global processor and merchandiser of palm oil, has come in for harsh criticism for the environmental and social impact of its Indonesian plantations. The allegations also raise serious questions about the role of WWF and the Round Table on Sustainable Palm Oil.

Grey Market Drugs: Profiting from Poorly Managed U.S. Health Care
by Terry J. AllenSpecial to CorpWatch
January 22nd, 2012
Scalpers are doing a booming business in key medical drugs by taking advantage of U.S. patients and hospitals when they are desperate for supplies from the poorly regulated $46 billion global contract-manufacturing industry.

State of Surveillance
by Pratap ChatterjeeCorpWatch/The Bureau of Investigative Journalism
December 1st, 2011
A new cache of Wikileaks documents on the secretive surveillance industry uncovers 160 companies in 25 countries that make $5 billion a year selling sophisticated surveillance technology to security authorities around the world to secretly carry out mass surveillance of people via their phones and computers.

Nightmare on Christmas Island: Serco's Australian Detention Center
by Patrick O'KeeffeSpecial to CorpWatch
October 25th, 2011
Serco, a UK company, has a contract to manage the Christmas Island Immigration Detention Centre some 1,600 miles off the West Coast of Australia, which houses thousands of asylum seekers. The detainees at the overcrowded facility are experiencing serious mental health problems that union organizers say are a result of poor training and understaffing.

Keystone Pipeline Faces Indigenous Trans-Border Opposition
by Geoff DembickiSpecial to CorpWatch
October 4th, 2011
TransCanada is seeking permission to build a 1,661-mile-long oil pipeline to carry crude from Alberta's oil sands to refineries on the Texas Gulf Coast. Tribal leaders from both sides of the border have joined environmental activists to oppose the project.

Indian Betel Farmers Battle South Korean Steel Giant
by Moushumi Basu with Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
August 30th, 2011
Farmers in Odisha are challenging POSCO, a South Korean steel giant. The confrontation is yet another David versus Goliath battle pitting “progress” against traditional agriculturists in a struggle to define development in India.

Burmese Crossroads: Oil & Gas Rush Stokes Civil War
by Matthew F SmithSpecial to CorpWatch
July 26th, 2011
Chinese and South Korean companies are leading an investor rush to Burma to build lucrative cross-country pipelines to deliver Saudi oil and Burmese natural gas to China. Poor communities have been displaced and allegations of human rights abuses are rife in the pipeline's route.

Toxic Pop: How Tar Sands Fuel Disposable Cans
by Geoff DembickiSpecial to CorpWatch
July 11th, 2011
One in six of the 100 billion soda, beer, and juice cans cracked open by North Americans each year owe their existence to an industrial product manufactured from Alberta’s tar sands. The result is an environmental disaster for Canada as well as a major contributor to global warming.

Subcontracting Substandard Services
by David IsenbergSpecial to CorpWatch
June 27th, 2011
Najlaa International Catering Services of Kuwait faces numerous complaints and court actions for non-payment of bills and alleged fraud for work conducted on U.S. military bases in Iraq. The allegations show that the Pentagon is still unable to manage subcontractors eight years after the invasion.

Killing Clean Energy Laws
by Geoff DembickiSpecial to CorpWatch
May 5th, 2011
Tar sands from Alberta have enabled Canada to become the largest supplier of crude oil to the U.S. Tom Corcoran, a Washington lobbyist, is paid to promote this rapidly growing industry that produces some of the most emissions-heavy gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel on the planet.

Indian Roads Endanger Ways of Life
by Nityanand JayaramanSpecial to CorpWatch
January 18th, 2011
A U.S.-based company is planning a system of elevated highways in Chennai, India, that will despoil natural resources that humans and wildlife have shared for millennia, environmentalists and villagers claim. Wilbur Smith Associates has won approval for the projects, they further charge, through deceptive practices and corporate sleight of hand.

Citizens United v. America's Citizens
by Charlie CraySpecial to CorpWatch
October 22nd, 2010
The midterm elections are days away, but the winners are virtually certain: the corporations and conservative operatives like Karl Rove who have taken advantage of the Supreme Court’s Citizens United ruling to establish a well-heeled “shadow party” of networked trade associations and G.O.P. front groups.

Dollar Stores: Top Link in the Sweatshop Chain
by Kent PatersonSpecial to CorpWatch
October 6th, 2010
A growing group of chain-store corporations that cater to America's poor with cheap goods are classifying workers as managers. By categorizing employees as salaried managers these dollar stores avoid paying overtime wages that the Fair Labor Standards Act mandates for hourly workers.

Global Horizons Indicted for Human Trafficking
by  Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
September 15th, 2010
Mordechai Orian, president of Global Horizons, a Los Angeles-based labor recruiter, was indicted by the U.S. Department of Justice for "engaging in a conspiracy to commit forced labor and document servitude" of some 400 Thai citizens who were brought to work on farms in the U.S.

Billion Dollar Audit Missed by Pentagon Watchdog
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
August 30th, 2010
Military auditors failed to complete an audit of the business systems of Ohio-based Mission Essential Personnel even though it had billed for $1 billion worth of work over the last four years, largely done in Afghanistan.

Gulf Dispersants: BP and Nalco Play Toxic Roulette
by Terry J. AllenSpecial to CorpWatch
July 19th, 2010
BP has dumped almost two million gallons of dispersants from Nalco in the Gulf of Mexico that is disguising the extent of the Deepwater spill and the inability of existing technology to mitigate the disaster. Even if BP eventually staunches the hemorrhage of oil, devastating toxins will linger for decades.

U.S. Congressional Wartime Commission Targets Armed Contractors
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
June 23rd, 2010
This week, almost a decade after the U.S. "War on Terror" began, the Commission on Wartime Contracting held two days of hearings into the role of private contractors in conducting and supporting war. The Congressional witness table included Aegis, DynCorp and Triple Canopy. Curiously, Blackwater was not called; and the CEO of Torres Advanced Enterprise Solutions failed to appear.

The True Cost of Chevron: An Alternative Annual Report
by Antonia JuhaszTrue Cost of Chevron
May 25th, 2010
Chevron's 2009 Annual Report celebrates 130 years of Chevron operations. We, the communities and our allies who bear the consequences of Chevron's offshore drilling rigs, oil and natural gas production, coal fields, refineries, depots, pipelines, exploration, chemical plants, political control, consumer abuse, false promises, and much more, have a very different account to offer.

ADM's New Frontiers: Palm Oil Deforestation and Child Labor
by Charlie CraySpecial to CorpWatch
May 18th, 2010
ADM has moved beyond the days of blatant price-fixing that landed its top execs behind bars. But the company's forays into new global agricultural markets bring charges of complicity in forced child labor and rampant deforestation. Critics assert that the conglomerate's embrace of self- regulation and voluntary guidelines is but a cynical ploy to deter effective reform.

BP: Beyond Petroleum or Beyond Preposterous? (2000)
by Kenny Bruno
May 12th, 2010
In 2000 British Petroleum launched an expensive ad campaign, re-branding its corporate image into the eco-friendly "BP: Beyond Petroleum.” We said it then. When a company spends more on advertising its environmental friendliness than on environmental actions, that's greenwash. Three long weeks into the BP oil disaster roiling the Gulf of Mexico, CorpWatch's December 2000 skewering of its new image sadly, bears repeating.

Afghanistan, Inc.: A CorpWatch Investigative Report (2006)
by Fariba NawaSpecial to CorpWatch
April 30th, 2010
The recent boom in humanitarian aid has an underbelly largely invisible to charity sector outsiders. “Easy money: the great aid scam," packs a biting critique (Linda Polman, The Sunday Times Online, April 25). In 2006, CorpWatch’s "Afghanistan, Inc.", cited by Polman, drilled down on reconstruction dollars, in what’s become known as “Afghaniscam.” We bring our report to you again.

Afghanistan Spy Contract Goes Sour for Pentagon
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
March 16th, 2010
Mike Furlong, a top Pentagon official, is alleged to have hired a company called International Media Ventures to supply information for drone strikes and assassinations in Afghanistan and Pakistan, according to a complaint filed by the CIA and revealed by the New York Times on March 15.

Protesters in Eastern India Battle Against Mining Giant Arcelor Mittal
by Moushumi BasuSpecial to CorpWatch
March 2nd, 2010
In the rural, tribal lands of Eastern India, protesters are going head-to-head with world steel giant Arcelor Mittal. “We may give away our lives, but we will not part with an inch of our ancestral land," the villagers cry. "The forest, rivers and land are ours. We don't want factories, steel or iron. Arcelor Mittal Go Back.”

DynCorp Oversight in Afghanistan Faulted
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
February 26th, 2010
Afghan police are widely considered corrupt and unable to shoot straight; they die at twice the rate of Afghan soldiers and NATO troops despite $7 billion spent on training and salaries in the last eight years. A new high-level report says that the State Department's contract with DynCorp is at fault.

Asia Inhales While the West Bans the Deadly Carcinogen
by Melody KempSpecial to CorpWatch
February 16th, 2010
Asbestos, a known carcinogen, causes 100,000 occupational deaths per year. Although banned in much of the world, asbestos is a common and dangerous building block in much of Asia’s development boom, and its export remains both legal and profitable -- to the health detriment of the region.

Agility Attempts to Vault Fraud Charges
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
February 1st, 2010
Agility, a Kuwait-based multi-billion dollar logistics company spawned by the U.S. invasion of Iraq, is facing criminal charges for over-billing the U.S. taxpayer on more than $8.5 billion worth of food supply contracts in the Iraq war zone. If the lawsuit is successful, the company could owe the U.S. government as much as $1 billion.

Shed a Tear for Our Democracy
by Robert WeissmanPublic Cititzen
January 22nd, 2010
Patronage from Exxon, Goldman Sachs, Pfizer and the rest of the Fortune 500 is already corroding the U.S. policy making process. In Citizens United v. FEC, the U.S. Supreme Court has now ruled that these corporate giants have a First Amendment right to spend unlimited amounts of money to influence election outcomes.

Temping Down Labor Rights: The Manpowerization of Mexico
by Kent PatersonSpecial to CorpWatch
January 6th, 2010
In the globalized electronics production chain, Mexico serves as the main assembler of Asian-produced components for electronics exported to the United States. Mexico's labor force is increasingly supplied by temporary workers employed through domestic and transnational corporations like Manpower.

The Enbridge Oil Sands Gamble
by Andrew NikiforukSpecial to CorpWatch
December 14th, 2009
Patrick Daniel, the CEO of Enbridge Inc, is bullish about the future of unconventional oil from Canada’s massive tar sand deposits. His company not only operates North America’s longest crude oil and liquid pipelines, but transports 12 percent of the oil that the U.S. imports daily. Canada’s bitumen, or dirty crude, lies under a forest area the size of England and is arguably the world’s last remaining giant oil field.

Bhopal: Generations of Poison
by Nityanand JayaramanSpecial to CorpWatch
December 2nd, 2009
On the night of December 2-3, 1984, the Union Carbide pesticide factory in Bhopal, India leaked poisonous methyl iso cyanate into its densely populated neighborhood, killing 8,000 people in the immediate aftermath. 25 years later, Dow Chemical (which purchased Union Carbide in 2001) still refuses to clean up the site. But a new generation of Bhopal survivors is taking on the fight.

CorpWatch Announces Version 2.0 of the CrocTail Corporate Subsidiaries Database and Open API
Special to CorpWatch
November 24th, 2009
Developed with support from the Sunlight Foundation, CrocTail provides an interface for browsing information about several hundred thousand corporations publicly traded in the U.S. and their domestic and foreign subsidiaries. In this new version, users can click on different years and see how subsidiary relationships for a company have changed over time.

Black & Veatch's Tarakhil Power Plant: White Elephant in Kabul
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
November 19th, 2009
In a secluded valley a few miles from Kabul's international airport, $285 million in U.S. taxpayer dollars have flowed into a Black & Veatch-built power plant outside Tarakhil village. But, far from the public relations coup the project was intended to supply, the plant has run into problems with planning, cost over-runs and alleged corruption.

Spies for Hire: New Online Database of U.S. Intelligence Contractors
by Tim ShorrockSpecial to CorpWatch
November 16th, 2009
CorpWatch joins with Tim Shorrock today, the first journalist to blow the whistle on the privatization of U.S. intelligence, in releasing Spies for Hire.org, a groundbreaking database focusing on the dozens of corporations that provide classified intelligence services to the United States government.

Uranium Corporation of India Limited: Wasting Away Tribal Lands
by Moushumi BasuSpecial to CorpWatch
October 7th, 2009
In Eastern India's Jharkand State, tensions are mounting between Indigenous tribal communities and the Uranium Corporation of India Limited, or UCIL. Heavy security at a May public hearing in Jadugoda prevented many local activists and villagers from entering. But outside the hearing, activists from the Jharkhandi Organization Against Radiation (JOAR) argued their case for protecting their health and the environment from horrific impacts of radioactive contaminated waste resulting from uranium mining.

Mission Essential, Translators Expendable
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
August 11th, 2009
Ohio-based Mission Essential Personnel supplies over 2,000 translators to the Pentagon in Afghanistan, who play a critical role in protecting local and military lives. These interpreters are a key communications link. But if they are wounded or killed, they are often left to fend for themselves. This special features video of CorpWatch interviews with three Afghan whistleblowers, recorded in country in April. Click through to hear their story.

Damming Magdalena: Emgesa Threatens Colombian Communities
by Jonathan LunaSpecial to CorpWatch
July 21st, 2009
Near the town of La Jagua, overlooking the Magdalena River, the landscape is dotted with concrete markers declaring the land, river, and everything else a “public utility” that Colombia has given to the energy company Emgesa as part of the Quimbo Hydroelectric Project. A construction permit was granted in May, with the dam scheduled for full operation by 2014.

Obama's Tax Haven Reform: Chump Change
by Charlie CraySpecial to CorpWatch
June 15th, 2009
In early May, the Obama administration announced plans to eliminate the advantages that multinationals have over domestic corporations as to the tax treatment of reinvested profits. K Street corporate lobbyists haven’t squealed so loudly since they lost their three martini lunches. The uproar draws attention away from the fact that U.S. multinationals enjoy an effective tax rate of just 2.4 percent on billions of dollars in foreign active earnings.

CorpWatch announces release of the CrocTail application and open CorpWatch API
June 8th, 2009
CorpWatch, with support from the Sunlight Foundation, announces release of the CrocTail application and open CorpWatch API. CrocTail provides an interface for browsing information about U.S. publicly traded corporations and their many foreign and domestic subsidiaries. CrocTail also serves as a demonstration of the features and data available through the CorpWatch API.

Is Halliburton Forgiven and Forgotten? Or How to Stay Out of Sight While Profiting From the War in Iraq
by Pratap ChatterjeeTomDispatch.com
June 3rd, 2009
At Halliburton's recent annual shareholders meeting in Houston, all was remarkably staid as the company celebrated its $4 billion in 2008 operating profits, a striking 22% return at a time when many companies are announcing record losses. Just three months ago, however, Halliburton didn't hesitate to pay $382 million in fines to the U.S. Department of Justice as part of the settlement of a controversial KBR gas project in Nigeria in which the company admitted to paying a $180 million bribe to government officials.

The True Cost of Chevron: An Alternative Annual Report
by Antonia Juhaszhttp://www.TrueCostofChevron.com/
May 26th, 2009
Chevron's 2008 annual report is a glossy celebration of the company's most profitable year in its history. What Chevron's annual report does not tell its shareholders is the true cost paid for those financial returns, or the global movement gaining voice and strength against the company's abuses. This jointly-produced report documents negative impacts of Chevron's operations around the globe, in stark contrast to the message sent by the company's ubiquitous "Human Energy" advertising campaign.

Mexico’s Other Crisis: Foreign Banks
by Kent PatersonSpecial to CorpWatch
May 15th, 2009
The worldwide financial crisis is hitting people in the Global South with particular venom, and disaster profiteering is alive and well. Take Mexico. While entities like Citigroup-owned Banamex get away with charging Mexican credit account-holders usurious interest rates of up to 100 percent, Banamex itself turned nearly $1 billion in profits in 2008.

Goa Cursed By Its Mineral Wealth
by Emily BildSpecial to CorpWatch
April 23rd, 2009
Set on India's west coast, Goa is renowned as a beach paradise popular with Indian and foreign tourists alike. Just a few miles inland from the quaint restaurants and the pristine waves lapping the silver shores of India's smallest state, iron-ore mining is destroying the environment, say activists and locals.

Regulating Ramatex: Authorities Shut Out as Malaysian Investor Threatens Namibian Environment
by Moses MagadzaSpecial to CorpWatch
April 5th, 2009
For nearly six years Ramatex Textile and Garment Factory barred government regulators from entering industrial premises leased from the City of Windhoek. Ramatex came to Namibia in 2001, lured by the newly implemented African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA). Evidence of environmental violations finally emerged after the company absconded.

Policing Afghanistan: Obama's New Strategy
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
March 23rd, 2009
A new strategy for Afghanistan and Pakistan will be unveiled by President Barack Obama this week. It plans to ramp up the training of the Afghan army and police at a cost of some $2 billion a year. Private contractor DynCorp is already lining up to bid for some of the lucrative contracts. This article provides an overview of key reports assessing the training of the Afghan police, and DynCorp's role, to date.

GEO Group, Inc.: Despite a Crashing Economy, Private Prison Firm Turns a Handsome Profit
by Erin RosaSpecial to CorpWatch
March 1st, 2009
While the nation’s economy flounders, business is booming for The GEO Group Inc., a private prison firm paid millions by the U.S. government. Behind the financial success and expansion of the for-profit security company, there are increasing charges of negligence, civil rights violations, abuse and even death.

Inheriting Halliburton's Army: What Will Obama Do With KBR?
by Pratap ChatterjeeTomDispatch.com
February 22nd, 2009
President Obama will almost certainly touch down in Baghdad and Kabul in Air Force One sometime in the coming year to meet his counterparts in Iraq and Afghanistan, and he will just as certainly pay a visit to a U.S. military base or two. Should he stay to eat with the troops, he will no less certainly choose from a menu prepared by migrant Asian workers under contract to Houston-based KBR, the former subsidiary of Halliburton.

Xstrata Dreaming: The Struggle of Aboriginal Australians against a Swiss Mining Giant
by Michael DeibertSpecial to CorpWatch
February 16th, 2009
The McArthur River winds through Australia’s remote Northern Territory, home to four main Aboriginal linguistic groups: the Gurdanji, Yanyuwa, Garawa and Mara. Earlier this month Australian Minister for Environment Peter Garrett announced conditional approval for a bid by Swiss mining giant Xstrata to expand its zinc mining operations in the sacred McArthur River floodplain.

Book Release: "Halliburton's Army: How A Well-Connected Texas Oil Company Revolutionized The Way America Makes War"
by Pratap ChatterjeeNation Books
February 3rd, 2009
In "HALLIBURTON’S ARMY: How a Well-Connected Texas Oil Company Revolutionized the Way America Makes War" (Nation Books; February 9, 2009; $26.95), muckraking journalist Pratap Chatterjee conducts a highly detailed investigation into Halliburton and its former subsidiary KBR’s activities in Kuwait and Iraq, uncovering much new information about its questionable practices and extraordinary profits.

Outsourcing Intelligence in Iraq: A CorpWatch Report on L-3/Titan, Updated December 2008 with Recommendations from Amnesty International
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
December 9th, 2008
When U.S. troops or embassy officials want to investigate Iraqis - such as interrogating prisoners, the principal intermediary is a Manhattan based-company named L-3. CorpWatch is pleased to release an updated version of this report, with recommendations from Amnesty International on human rights and other standards for translation and intelligence contracting.

Norilsk Nickel: A Tale of Unbridled Capitalism, Russian Style
by Anton FoekSpecial to CorpWatch
October 9th, 2008
The launch of Russia’s stock markets in the early 90s and privatization of state assets has profoundly impacted Russian society. As the case of mining giant Norilsk Nickel illustrates, this experiment has given rise to both immense personal wealth for a new elite, and economic uncertainty for the ordinary citizen.

One Million Weapons to Iraq; Many Go Missing
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
September 22nd, 2008
An Alabama company controlled by a billionaire Kuwaiti family is the biggest supplier of guns to Iraq. These weapons were paid for by the Pentagon which has lost track of them. A new Amnesty international report says that such unrestrained global arms trading schemes may have catastrophic human rights consequences.

Toyota: Auto Industry Race to the Bottom
by Barbara BriggsSpecial to CorpWatch
September 16th, 2008
Globally, Toyota is known for its innovation and quality of products like the Prius hybrid. A closer look at operations in Japan, the Philippines, Myanmar and the U.S. reveals a story of extreme working conditions, union-busting and other corporate abuses. In Japan and elsewhere, workers are speaking out.

Absolving Your Sins and CYA: Corporations Embrace Voluntary Codes of Conduct
by Anne Landman, Center for Media and DemocracySpecial to CorpWatch
August 18th, 2008
Multinational industries like tobacco and alcohol have responded to increased global public pressure for accountability around corporate operations by creating Voluntary Codes of Conduct to self-regulate their behavior. But how are the results measuring up?

Ducking Responsibility: Entergy Spins Its Nukes
by Shay TottenSpecial to CorpWatch
August 4th, 2008
Entergy Nuclear (part of the broader Entergy energy family) is spinning off its northeastern U.S.-based nuclear power plants into a related limited liability corporation, Enexus. Stakeholders in Vermont, home of the Yankee Nuclear power plant, are less than happy, with Entergy also reneging on prior commitments to cover eventual plant decommissioning costs, potentially stranding taxpayers with much of the bill.

Dark Side of the Tourist Boom: Cruise Ship Controversies Cross Borders
by Kent PatersonSpecial to CorpWatch
July 9th, 2008
The Mexican Pacific resort of Zihuatanejo recently cancelled a major new cruise ship terminal, giving a victory to environmental activists and other opponents. However, Mexico remains the world’s Number One cruise ship destination; and with little regulation, allegations of onboard crime, and increasing militarization as regards security while ships are in port, the rapidly expanding industry is facing new challenges.

A Glittering Demon: Mining, Poverty and Politics in the Democratic Republic of Congo
by Michael DeibertSpecial to CorpWatch
June 26th, 2008
In the DRC, a nation rich in natural resources yet confounded by civil war and endemic poverty, artisanal mining communities are struggling for their livelihoods as foreign multinationals like AngloGold Ashanti rush to cash in.

Crossing the Wayúu: Pipeline Divides Indigenous Lands in South America
by Jonathan Luna Special to CorpWatch
June 5th, 2008
Touted as the first step in a major regional integration project, the 225-kilometer TransCaribe pipeline travels underground across Colombia's Guajira Peninsula to the gas refineries of Maracaibo, Venezuela. Protesting the mega project's impacts on the peninsula's indigenous communities, the Wayúu community of Mashiis-Manaa is leading the struggle against oil giant Petróleos de Venezuela.

Suing the Smelter: Oklahoma Town Takes on Freeport
by Eliza StricklandSpecial to CorpWatch
May 15th, 2008
Residents of the town of Blackwell, Oklahoma have brought a class action lawsuit against mining giant Freeport McMoRan. The plaintiffs say that the company's zinc smelter, which closed in 1974, left a toxic legacy in the town, including contaminated sand from the smelter that was given away for free.

Booming Chinese Demand Has Ripples Down Under In Queensland
by Patrick O'KeeffeSpecial to CorpWatch
April 16th, 2008
A bauxite mine and a proposed refinery in northern Queensland, Australia, to be developed by a Chinese mineral company, has divided local and traditional landowners. Part of a major industrialization scheme, it has also sparked worries among environmentalists.

Smokestack Injustice? Toxic Texas Smelter May Reopen
by Kent PatersonSpecial to CorpWatch
April 2nd, 2008
The old American Smelting and Refining Company (Asarco) copper smelter in El Paso, Texas, which has spewed out toxins for over a century, has been granted a new five-year permit. This is despite the fact that it violates international laws by polluting communities on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border.

Ecuador's Yasuni Park: Oil Exploration or Nature Protection?
by Agneta EnströmSpecial to CorpWatch
March 20th, 2008
Permission for Petrobras of Brazil to drill for oil in Yasuni National Park, one of the most biologically diverse places in the world, has been suspended, but some damage has already been done by Swedish construction giant Skanska. Unless new money is found to protect the forest, exploration may resume.

Carlyle Group May Buy Major CIA Contractor: Booz Allen Hamilton
by Tim Shorrock Special to CorpWatch
March 8th, 2008
The Carlyle Group, one of the world's largest private equity funds, may soon buy out the $2 billion dollar intelligence division of Booz Allen Hamilton, one of the biggest advisors to the U.S. spy community.

Playing with Children's Lives: Big Tobacco in Malawi
by Pilirani Semu-BandaSpecial to CorpWatch
February 25th, 2008
Cigarettes may be damaging not only your own health, but also that of some of the world's poorest children. Much of Malawi's thriving tobacco industry rests on the backs of exploited children, some as young as five years old.

Burying Indonesia’s Millions: The Legacy of Suharto
by Andreas HarsonoSpecial to CorpWatch
February 15th, 2008
Over the last 50 years, a network of cronies helped former Indonesian president Suharto build a business empire and amass a multi-billion dollar fortune. Today his successors face an uphill battle to recover the money even after his death.

An Uncomfortable Spotlight in Davos
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
January 31st, 2008
The CEOs of three-quarters of the world's 100 largest companies have just completed an uncomfortable weekend at the tiny Swiss ski resort of Davos, while their companies' share prices nosedived on global stock markets, amid concern that the U.S. economy is staggering towards recession.

QinetiQ Goes Kinetic: Top Rumsfeld Aide Wins Contracts From Spy Office He Set Up
by Tim Shorrock Special to CorpWatch
January 15th, 2008
A Pentagon office that was reprimanded by the U.S. Congress for spying on antiwar activists, has just awarded a multi-million dollar contract to QinetiQ, a British company that employs Stephen Cambone. Cambone, a former aide to Donald Rumsfeld, helped create the very office that issued the contract.

Bulgarian Ski Complex Threatens Rila National Park
by Katherine ChandlerSpecial to CorpWatch
January 4th, 2008
A new ski complex is being constructed in the environmentally sensitive Seven Lakes region of the snow-capped Rila mountains of south-western Bulgaria. Yet authorities have not been able to produce any planning permits nor have the investors produced any documentation of who is funding the construction.

The Gunmen of Kabul
by Fariba NawaSpecial to CorpWatch
December 21st, 2007
The booming private security industry in Afghanistan has been the target of a number government raids in the last few months. One of the largest contractors -- United States Protection and Investigations (USPI) from Texas -- has been accused of corruption.

Climate Change Debate Fuels Greenwash Boom
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
December 11th, 2007
On the Indonesian island of Bali, thousands of senior government officials are negotiating a plan to slow global warming. The coal, gas and oil companies that are major producers of greenhouse gases are finally taking notice of these high-level political discussions, and many have mounted spirited public relations exercises to defend themselves.

Domestic Spying, Inc.
by Tim Shorrock Special to CorpWatch
November 27th, 2007
A new U.S. intelligence institution will allow government spy agencies to conduct broad surveillance and reconnaissance inside the country for the first time. Contractors like Boeing, BAE Systems, Harris Corporation, L-3 Communications and Science Applications International Corporation are already lining up for possible work.

Titanium or Water? Trouble brews in Southern India
by Nityanand JayaramanSpecial to CorpWatch
October 24th, 2007
Tata, India's largest conglomerate, wants to take 10,000 acres of land to mine ilmenite in the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu. The plan has sparked protests by local villagers who say the project will destroy their traditional way of life and the environment.

Sunshine Laws to Track European Lobbyists
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
October 11th, 2007
Some 15,000 lobbyists work in Brussels where they meet secretly with European Union officials to try and influence the rules that govern the 27 countries that together form the world’s most powerful economic bloc. New guidelines will attempt to make this lobbying more public and reveal conflicts of interest.

The Boys from Baghdad: Iraqi Commandos Trained by U.S. Contractor
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
September 20th, 2007
Iraqi commandos are being training by USIS, a Virginia-based company that was once owned by the Carlyle Group. One of multiple "security" forces being created with $20 billion in U.S. funds, these Emergency Response Units may be stoking civil unrest as they accompany U.S. troops on raids.

Casualties of Katrina: Gulf Coast Reconstruction Two Years after the Hurricane
by Eliza Strickland and Azibuike AkabaSpecial to CorpWatch
August 27th, 2007
This CorpWatch report, by Eliza Strickland and Azibuike Akaba, tells the story of corporate malfeasance and government incompetence two years after Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans. This is our second report – Big, Easy Money by Rita J. King was the first – and it digs into a slew of new scandals.

Lessons of Empire: India, 60 Years After Independence
by Nick Robins and Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
August 14th, 2007
60 years after India gained independence, British capital is still exploiting poor communities in its former colony. Centuries after Britain's East India Company -- the world's first multinational -- faced protests in London, a group of villagers continue the tradition of resistance.

Doctoring the Evidence: GlaxoSmithKline Pushes Depression Drug
by Shelley JofreSpecial to Corp Watch
July 30th, 2007
GlaxoSmithKline provides research funding to doctors who write favorable opinions of depression drugs for children, despite evidence from clinical trials that the medication can cause anger and even suicide.

Mud and the Minister: A Tale of Woe in Java
by Anton FoekSpecial to CorpWatch
July 20th, 2007
Over a year after a torrent of liquid mud at an Indonesian oil exploration site inundated four villages, killing almost 100 people, the local community is still awaiting clean-up and proper compensation. This is despite the fact that the drilling company is owned by the family of a senior Indonesian minister.

Fencing the Border: Boeing's High-Tech Plan Falters
by Joseph RicheySpecial to Corp Watch
July 9th, 2007
Boeing is behind schedule in building a high-tech "virtual fence" on the Arizona border between the U.S. and Mexico. Critics say that this new surveillance system will not resolve immigration issues and may create new problems.

Soaring Executive Pay Attacked by Shareholder Activists
by Sam PizzigatiSpecial to CorpWatch
June 26th, 2007
Last year, the CEOs of the 500 biggest U.S. companies averaged $15.2 million in total annual compensation, according to Forbes business magazine’s annual executive pay survey. The top eight CEOs on the Forbes list each pocketed over $100 million. Stunning numbers like these have moved executive pay onto America’s political radar screen.

The Life and Death of a Border Town
by David MartinezSpecial to CorpWatch
June 12th, 2007
Two towns in the Mexican border state of Coahuila discover the reality of "free trade" with the United States: Ramos Arizpe is still riding the boom in automobile production while Morelos has been abandoned by the denim manufacturers, as factories relocate to even cheaper production sites overseas.

Goodbye Houston: An Alternative Annual Report on Halliburton
May 15th, 2007
CorpWatch and its partners today released an alternative annual report on Halliburton titled: "Goodbye Houston" The new report was prepared in association with Halliburton Watch and the Oil & Gas Accountability Project.

Trademarking Coffee: Starbucks cuts Ethiopia deal
by Anton FoekSpecial to CorpWatch
May 8th, 2007
Starbucks, the world's largest coffee shop chain, and the Ethiopian government are on the verge of unveiling a deal that the company hopes will end attacks on the company's carefully constructed ethical image.

Barrick's Dirty Secrets: Communities Respond to Gold Mining's Impacts Worldwide
May 1st, 2007
A new CorpWatch report details the operations of Barrick Gold in nine different countries, focusing on the efforts on the part of the communities to seek justice from this powerful multinational.
Download Spanish version of report

Speaking Diné to Dirty Power: Navajo Challenge New Coal-Fired Plant
by Jeff ConantSpecial to CorpWatch
April 3rd, 2007
A small, but growing, group of Diné indigenous peoples in New Mexico are protesting against a planned new huge coal-fired power plant. This is one of 150 similar plants scheduled to supply an anticipated boom in energy demand in the U.S.

Mystery of the Missing Meters: Accounting for Iraq's Oil Revenue
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
March 22nd, 2007
How much crude oil is Iraq actually exporting? Nobody really knows how much is potentially being stolen by corrupt officials because the contractors in charge of fixing the meters have yet to calibrate them, four years after the invasion.

Merck's Murky Dealings: HPV Vaccine Lobby Backfires
by Terry J. AllenSpecial to CorpWatch
March 7th, 2007
Merck's lobbying campaign for mandatory vaccination of school girls provided funding for a prominent women's non-profit. The ensuing uproar has created a backlash against the pharmaceutical giant.

Barrick Gold Mine Transforms Pacific Island
by David MartinezSpecial to CorpWatch
February 21st, 2007
Papua New Guinea, one of the world's largest islands, has fortunes in gold under its lush green mountains and a diversity of indigenous culture. The arrival of a Canadian mining company has brought violent clashes and transformed the indigenous lands forever.

Listen to an interview with the author, David Martinez


This Alien Life: Privatized Prisons for Immigrants
by Deepa FernandesSpecial to CorpWatch
February 5th, 2007
In the wake of the September 11th attacks, the U.S. government invoked national security to sweep up and jail an unprecedented number of immigrants. Companies like Corrections Corporation of America and Wackenhut, have reaped the benefits.

High-Tech Healthcare in Iraq, Minus the Healthcare
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
January 8th, 2007
Almost four years after the toppling of Saddam Hussein, Iraq’s healthcare system is still a shambles. While most hospitals lack basic supplies, dozens of incomplete clinics and warehoused high-technology equipment remain as a testament to the failed U.S. experiment to reconstruct of Iraq. First in a series of CorpWatch articles.

US: Swift sued over hiring
by Christine TatumDenver Post
December 12th, 2006
Eighteen former Swift & Co. employees who worked at the meatpacker's Cactus, Texas, plant have filed a $23 million lawsuit alleging that Swift hired illegal workers to depress employee wages.

Guest Workers Seek Global Horizons: U.S. Company Profits From Migrant Labor
by Kari LydersenSpecial to CorpWatch
November 3rd, 2006
Global Horizons is one of the biggest companies in the business of importing temporary foreign workers to do jobs in the U.S. ranging from agriculture to nursing. Their workers endure similar working conditions to undocumented workers, prompting government investigations. Global Horizon Responds

A U.S. Fortress Rises in Baghdad: Asian Workers Trafficked to Build World's Largest Embassy
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
October 17th, 2006
Workers accuse the Kuwait contractor building the US embassy in Baghdad of smuggling low-paid South Asians into Iraq and labor trafficking. Still, the US State Department casts a blind eye on the complaints as it rushes to complete its most ambitious project ever.

Afghanistan, Inc.: A CorpWatch Investigative Report
October 6th, 2006
This weekend marks the fifth anniversary of the US invasion of Afghanistan. Fariba Nawa, an Afghan-American who returned to her native country to examine the progress of reconstruction, uncovers some examples of where the money has (and hasn’t) gone, how the system of international aid works (and doesn’t), and what it is really like in the villages and cities where outsiders are rebuilding the war-torn countryside. Click here to download the complete report.
An HTML text version of the report is also available. Listen, watch or read an interview with Fariba Nawa on Democracy Now! about reconstruction, security, and life in Afghanistan five years after the invasion.


US: Ex-Workers Testify About Halliburton
by Griff WitteWashington Post
September 19th, 2006
A Democratic Policy Committee hearing spurred by a lawsuit has renewed attention on Halliburton Co., which has come under intense scrutiny as the largest U.S. contractor in Iraq.

An Insider in Brussels: Lobbyists Reshape the European Union
by Elke CronenbergSpecial to CorpWatch
September 18th, 2006
In order to influence the new laws that encompass the 25 countries of the European Union, now the world's largest single economy, some 15,000 lobbyists have flocked to Brussels, its political heart. The public relations firm Burson-Mastellar is one of the most active among them.

Smelter Struggle: Trinidad Fishing Community Fights Aluminum Project
by Sujatha FernandesSpecial to CorpWatch
September 6th, 2006
Fishing communities in the Caribbean island of Trinidad are protesting a $US1.5 billion aluminum smelter that will process raw material from Brazil, Jamaica and Surinam. Cedros Peninsula United, a local organization, says that the factory uses technology that has had serious environmental impacts in countries from China to Iceland and the U.S.

Disaster Profiteering on the American Gulf Coast Fact Sheet
CorpWatch Hurricane Katrina factsheet with examples of exploitation and waste by corporations hired to clean up and rebuild the Gulf Coast, one year after disaster struck.

Big, Easy Money
August 17th, 2006
Disaster profiteers make millions while local companies and laborers in New Orleans and the rest of the Katrina-devastated Gulf Coast region are systematically getting the short end of the stick, according to a major new report from the nonprofit CorpWatch.
Click here for the press release, to see key findings, get quick facts, read the text version or to download the report.
Listen to audio of the August 18th press conference, with Rita J. King, Pratap Chatterjee and Brooke Biggs.

Intelligence in Iraq: L-3 Supplies Spy Support
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
August 9th, 2006
L-3 Communications, a little-known but gigantic military contractor, provides 300 contract intelligence experts to the Pentagon in Iraq to support operations ranging from interrogation to media analysis. The secretive $426.5 million operation, which is run out of Virginia, may be a recipe for disaster, say critics.
Also see related story, A Translator's Tale, by Pratap Chatterjee.

A Translator's Tale
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
August 9th, 2006
Goran Habbeb was shot and left for dead by gunmen in Iraq for helping troops in counter-intelligence tasks. He worked for Titan, a military contractor, who supply translators to the military under a profitable multi-billion dollar contract. Almost 200 of their workers have been killed, the highest by far of any contractor in Iraq.

Pinochet's Dutch Secret
by Anton FoekSpecial to CorpWatch
July 24th, 2006
A major Dutch arms manufacturer's bankruptcy revealed a secret deal to supply weapons to General Augusto Pinochet of Chile. The man behind the scheme is now a tax exile who appears to be immune from charges of bribery or tax evasion.

Iraq After Halliburton
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
July 12th, 2006
The controversial multibillion-dollar deal with oil services giant Halliburton to provide logistical support to U.S. troops in Iraq has been canceled. What should happen next? Read our three alternative annual reports on Halliburton, to learn the real legacy of the company's incompetence and corruption.
Listen to an interview with CorpWatch's director, Pratap Chatterjee.

Border for Sale
by Joseph RicheySpecial to CorpWatch
July 5th, 2006
Five major military contractors are competing to design a system to tackle up to two million undocumented immigrants a year in the United States. Boeing, Ericsson, Lockheed, Northrop Grumman and Raytheon are working on proposals that focus on high technology rather than high fences, but ignoring some of the fundamental problems of immigration. Listen to an interview with author, Joseph Richey.

A Proxy Battle: Shareholders vs. CEOs
by Kevin KelleherSpecial to CorpWatch
June 13th, 2006
Earnest shareholder resolutions presented at company annual general meetings on everything from human rights to executive compensation are routinely shot down in flames. But shareholder resolutions may have an effect, even in defeat.

Green Fuel's Dirty Secret
by Sasha LilleySpecial to CorpWatch
June 1st, 2006
Ethanol made from corn has been touted as the "green fuel" of the future. Archer Daniels Midland, the largest U.S. producer of ethanol, stands to make a fortune from environmentally conscious car drivers. But is ethanol really as environmentally clean as it is hyped to be? Listen to an interview with Sasha Lilley on CorpWatch Radio. 

Stolen for Steel: Tata Takes Tribal Lands in India
by Nityanand JayaramanSpecial to CorpWatch
May 24th, 2006
The Tata Group, one of India's biggest and oldest multinationals, has taken over tribal land to build an enormous steel plant in Orissa. A clash between the traditional owners of the land and the police has resulted in numerous injuries and deaths, calling into the question the prestigious family-owned company's philanthropic image.

Entergy Holds New Orleans for Ransom
by Rita J. KingSpecial to Corp Watch
May 10th, 2006
Entergy, one of the largest utilities in the U.S., has enjoyed healthy profits since Hurricane Katrina. Yet its New Orleans subsidiary has filed for bankruptcy, and frightened ratepayers with visions of bills bloated to 140% of their pre-storm size. Now the Fortune 500 company is threatening to pull the plug on New Orleans if it doesn't get a $700 million-plus federal bailout it doesn't actually need.

Target: Wal-Mart Lite
by Kari LydersenSpecial to CorpWatch
April 20th, 2006
Shopping in a Target store, you know you’re not in Wal-Mart. But, critics say that in terms of working conditions, sweatshop-style foreign suppliers, and effects on local retail communities, big box Target stores are very much like Wal-Mart, just in a prettier package.

Australia Reaps Iraqi Harvest
by Marc MoncriefSpecial to CorpWatch
April 4th, 2006
United Nations sanctions against Saddam Hussein may have failed to end his regime but they succeeded in enriching both the Iraqi dictator and corporations able to manipulate the scandal-ridden world body's Oil-for-Food program. Among the profiteers was the Australian Wheat Board, a former state-owned monopoly, which funneled over $200 million into Saddam's coffers even as the “Coalition of the Willing” was preparing for invasion.

Pink "iPods" for Democracy!
by Fariba NawaSpecial to CorpWatch
March 15th, 2006
Voice for Humanity recently sold tens of thousands of pink and silver audio players to the United States government to teach Afghan villagers about democracy. Critics say that the project was a waste of taxpayer dollars. Others say it is a perfect example of the covert "information war" conducted in the "war on terrorism."

Happy Meals, Unhappy Workers
by Aaron Glantz and Ngoc NguyenSpecial to CorpWatch
March 6th, 2006
Vietnamese workers earn less than $2 a day making stuffed animals and Happy Meal toys for U.S. consumers. An ongoing series of wildcat strikes this winter has forced the government to raise wages to prevent factories from moving to other countries.

Listen to an interview about this article with Aaron Glantz on CorpWatch Radio.


Ports of Profit
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
February 24th, 2006
The ports of Dubai make up some of the busiest commercial hubs in the world for the "global war of terrorism." Conveniently located between the Afghanistan and Iraq, Dubai is the ideal jumping-off point for military contractors and a lucrative link in the commercial supply chain of goods and people.

Baghdad Embassy Bonanza
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
February 12th, 2006
A controversial Kuwait-based construction firm accused of exploiting employees and coercing low-paid laborers to work in war-torn Iraq against their will is now building the new $592-million U.S. embassy in Baghdad.

Listen to an interview with David Phinney about this article on CorpWatch Radio.


Gasoline Crisis in Iraq
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
February 8th, 2006
Contract mismanagement and possible corruption in the Iraqi government are fueling a crisis over international gasoline delivery into Iraq. Citing a mountain of unpaid bills, the governments of Turkey and Saudi Arabia have shut off gasoline exports to Iraq. With it's options dwindling and beleaguered Iraqis demanding fuel, Baghdad has begun to negotiate with former arch-rival, Iran.

Iraqi Port Weathers Danish Storm
by Lotte Folke Kaarsholm, Charlotte Aagaard and Osama Al-HabahbehSpecial to CorpWatch
January 31st, 2006
High-ranking officials from the United States as well as Iraq accuse the Danish shipping company Maersk of having taken advantage of the chaos of war in order to grab control of Iraq’s oil port.

Uruguay: Pulp Factions: Uruguay’s Environmentalists v. Big Paper
by Raúl PierriSpecial to CorpWatch
January 16th, 2006
Massive monoculture plantations have begun a cascade of changes to Uruguay’s economy, environment and culture. Now, the foreign corporations that grow the trees are escalating the process by building massive pulp mills that threatening lives and livelihoods.

HAITI: Haiti Telecom Kickbacks Tarnish Aristide
by Lucy KomisarSpecial to CorpWatch
December 29th, 2005
In two lawsuits, politically connected U.S. telecom companies have been accused of kickbacks to Former President Aristide and his associates.

Coca Farmer Wins Bolivian Election: New President to Challenge Multinationals
by Anton FoekSpecial to CorpWatch
December 28th, 2005
Evo Morales, an Aymara Indian who grew up in childhood poverty, has won the Bolivian presidential elections. He is part of a wave of leftists taking power in Latin America and challenging multinational corporations.

Some Strings Attached: Cotton, Farm subsidies tie up global trade talks
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
December 13th, 2005
West African cotton farmers are among those hardest hit by government subsidized corporate agriculture. This week in Hong Kong, trade ministers from the 148 members of the World Trade Organization meet to discusss this and other global free trade issues.

From Mercenaries to Peacemakers?
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
November 29th, 2005
A grainy video (download here) of private contractors shooting at civilian cars on Iraqi streets poses a difficult question: how should the military security industry be regulated? Do they have a role in peacekeeping or are they part of the problem?

Vedanta Undermines Indian Communities
by Nityanand JayaramanSpecial to Corpwatch
November 15th, 2005
Vedanta, a fast growing British mining and aluminium production company founded by a billionaire expatriate Bombay businessman, threatens communities in India with environmental degradation and widespread pollution.

Meet the New Interrogators: Lockheed Martin
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
November 4th, 2005
Sytex, a subsidiary of Lockheed , the world's largest military contractor, has emerged as one of the biggest recruiters of private interrogators deployed to the United States-run prisons in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Shot Down: Lobby Kills Brazil Gun Ban
by Anton FoekSpecial to CorpWatch
October 25th, 2005
The world’s first ever referendum on banning civilian guns in Brazil failed to pass this past Sunday. Among those profiting are Taurus, the largest small arms producer and manufacturer in Latin America.

Blood, Sweat & Tears: Asia’s Poor Build U.S. Bases in Iraq
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
October 3rd, 2005
Thousands of low-wage Asian laborers are traveling to Iraq to work for U.S. military contractors like First Kuwaiti and Prime Projects International in the hope of sending money home to their families. Trapped and exploited under inhuman conditions, many of them are now fleeing the country to save their lives.

Big, Easy Iraqi-Style Contracts Flood New Orleans
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
September 20th, 2005
As Katrina's flood waters recede, government contractors are flowing into the Gulf Coast and reaping billions of dollars in pre-bid, limited bid, and sometimes no-bid contracts. Many of these contractors and the men who award them are the same players who bungled the reconstruction of Iraq. Deja vu all over again.

Hurricane Katrina and Climate Justice
by Joshua KarlinerSpecial to CorpWatch
September 12th, 2005
For nearly five years George Bush has infuriated much of the world by refusing to take action on global warming. Instead, he has called for more study. In a way, he got what he wanted with Hurricane Katrina.

The Cows Have Come Home
by Diane FarsettaSpecial to CorpWatch
September 1st, 2005
After fighting mad cow safeguards, the US beef industry complains about the consequences - a multi-billion dollar decline in exports - and a shortage of imported beef because of inadequate domestic testing and labeling.

Bad Faith: Fraud in the Insurance Industry
by Ray BourhisSpecial to CorpWatch
August 24th, 2005
When individuals sue major corporations, the odds are stacked against them. One woman's fight against an insurance giant details those odds and what it takes to beat them.

The Great American Jobs Scam
by Greg LeRoy, Special to CorpWatch
August 10th, 2005
Lurking within the records of most cities and states in America there lies a scandal. A tax scandal. A jobs scandal. A corporate and political scandal.

Religious Right Discovers Investment Activism
by Cynthia L. CooperSpecial to CorpWatch
August 3rd, 2005
A tiny, but effective, religious right financial movement is using fundamentalist values and shareolder activism to push conservative evangelism into corporate suites.

Mixing Occuption and Oil in Western Sahara
by Jacob MundySpecial to CorpWatch
July 21st, 2005
Oklahoma-based Kerr-McGee's contract with Morocco to explore for oil and gain in the contested territory on the Atlantic coast of northern Africa is complicating a 30 year independence struggle.

Oil Fuels Suriname-Guyana Border Clash
by Anton FoekSpecial to CorpWatch
July 5th, 2005
Canadian, Spanish and Danish companies are fueling a border clash in the remote coastal waters off the northern edge of South America in an effort to profit out of recently discovered coastal oil reserves.
NEW!Hallliburton Wins New $4.9Billion Iraq Contract


Halliburton Hearing Unearths New Abuse
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
June 27th, 2005
"Misplaced" portable military bases, thousand-dollar VCRs, and expired food are only a few of the new charges that have been brought against the most powerful military contractor in Iraq.

Barrick Gold Strikes Opposition in South America
by Glenn WalkerSpecial to CorpWatch
June 20th, 2005
A proposal to "relocate" three Andean glaciers to mine for gold has local people up in arms. This billion dollar development could destroy a major source of clean water on the border of Argentina and Chile.

Playing Chicken: Ghana vs. the IMF
by Linus AtarahSpecial to CorpWatch
June 14th, 2005
Thanks to the IMF and the World Bank, chicken and other local agriculture staples in Ghana are being replaced by subsidized foreign imports.

Marines Jail Contractors in Iraq
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
June 7th, 2005
Tension and confusion are on the rise in Iraq after a group of American security contractors were thrown in jail under suspicion for shooting at the US Marines in Fallujah.

The Baku-Ceyhan Pipeline: BP’s Time Bomb
by Hannah EllisSpecial to CorpWatch
June 2nd, 2005
With their newly opened pipeline, British Petroleum (BP) is cutting a path of environmental and social irresponsibility from the Caspian to the Mediterranean.

Adding Insult to Injury
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
May 24th, 2005
Many Halliburton contractors leave Iraq with debilitating injuries and deep psychological scars. Then they return home only to find that the insurance they need to rebuild their lives is out of reach.

Houston, We Still Have A Problem
by Andrea Buffa and Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
May 16th, 2005
This week, CorpWatch publishes a special alternative annual report on Halliburton. From bribery, fraud, and corruption in Iraq, to the undermining of US government regulations that protect drinking water at home, we take a closer look at this controversial company's track record in 2004.

Yukos Kingpin on Trial
by Lucy KomisarSpecial to CorpWatch
May 10th, 2005
This week, a Moscow court will issue a verdict in the tax fraud trial of billionaire Mikhail Khodorkovsky. While some critics argue that the charges are politically motivated, others question his innocence in the eyes of the West.

'Tis the Season for Shareholder Activism
by Jan FrelSpecial to CorpWatch
May 4th, 2005
Every spring, activists and investors attend annual general meetings to protest and meet face-to-face with CEOs and corporate boards. The goal is to place their agendas -- on everything from the environment to labor practices -- front and center.

Contract Quagmire in Iraq
by  David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
April 27th, 2005
Rioting and threats of work stoppages at critical transportation hubs needed to rebuild the war-torn Iraq have erupted in recent months following payment disputes between contractors originally hired by the U.S.-led Coalition Provisional Authority and Iraqi officials skeptical of the billings and the CPA's handiwork.

Meat Packer's Union on the Chopping Block
by Sasha LilleySpecial to CorpWatch
April 18th, 2005
Today's meat packing industry relies increasingly on high-speed, treacherous disassembly lines. Perhaps that's why Tyson Foods, Inc. -- a giant in a flourishing industry -- is working to take apart a union that prioritizes safety over speed.

University, Inc.
by Jennifer BordenSpecial to CorpWatch
April 11th, 2005
From research patents to high-stakes partnerships, Jennifer Washburn spent years researching the links between industry and the American University. In this exclusive interview with CorpWatch's Jennifer Borden, Washburn talks about what she found, why it matters and what you can do about it.

Bringing Business Back Ashore
by Lucy KomisarSpecial to CorpWatch
April 4th, 2005
A new breed of leadership is working to make Buenos Aires, Argentina, a local, transparent economy and a model for the rest of the world.

Halliburton Bribery Scandal Deepens
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
March 29th, 2005
Halliburton officials are being investigated for taking millions of dollars in bribes while staying at a lavish seaside resort in Kuwait, in return for sub-contracts to supply the US military in Iraq. Jeff Alex Mazon is the first of these Halliburton managers to be indicted for corruption.

Driving Into Danger
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
March 29th, 2005
A grieving family is suing Halliburton for the wrongful death of Tony Johnson, a truck driver killed while en route on the deadliest day the Iraq war has seen so far. Did the company knowingly place their workers in harm's way? The Johnsons -- and the flood of families waiting to file similar lawsuits -- say they did.

Food Giants on the Run
by Michele SimonSpecial to CorpWatch
March 21st, 2005
The food industry is working with politicians across the United States to rewrite laws in order to shield themselves from lawsuits based on obesity and related health problems.

BlueLinx Buys Illegal Indonesian Timber
by Steve SlatterySpecial to CorpWatch
March 14th, 2005
JP Morgan Chase and BlueLinx linked to illegal logging of endangered Indonesia forests.

Fighting the Big Gunns in Tasmania
by Tom PriceSpecial to CorpWatch
March 14th, 2005
The war between the world's largest woodchip exporter, Gunns Limited, and the Australian conservation community has been raging for decades. But the company's recent efforts to silence Tasmanian activists through lawsuits could earn them millions and set a very dangerous precedent. ALSO: BlueLinx Buys Illegal Indonesian Timber

An Interrogator Speaks Out
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
March 7th, 2005
A former military interrogator talks about what went wrong at Guantanamo Bay and Abu Ghraib.

Intelligence, Inc.
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
March 7th, 2005
US military interrogators -- who will work at sites ranging from Abu Ghraib to Guantanamo Bay -- must first receive training at one obscure military fort in Southern Arizona. Today, that training has been taken over by private contractors working for profit. ALSO: An Interrogator Speaks Out

Carbon: Under Kyoto, a Hot Commodity
by Daphne WyshamSpecial to CorpWatch
February 18th, 2005
Are World Bank-funded efforts to compensate for corporate emissions sustainable? Or will they affect poor communities disproportionately?

The Carbon Brokers
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
February 18th, 2005
Traders are gearing up for a new futures market. These new carbon exchanges promise billions in potential profit, but will they save the planet?

Spinning Media for Government
by Chris RaphaelSpecial to CorpWatch
February 10th, 2005
Public relations giant Omnicom has received almost a quarter of a billion dollars in contracts from the federal government for public relations work. At least one has been labeled "covert propaganda," another involved paying off a journalist and opinion-maker.

Two World Forums, Two Visions
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
January 27th, 2005
While the world's biggest CEOs and politicians gather in Davos, Switzerland to network and negotiate, activists and NGO-workers meet halfway around the world in Porto Alegre, Brazil to imagine other, more humanity-focused possibilities.

Exporting Cures, Importing Misery
by By Stan CoxAlterNet
January 19th, 2005
The Kazipally industrial area – once good farm country – now accounts for more than one-third of India's pharmaceutical industry, meaning skyrocketing rates of cancer, heart disease and birth defects for its residents.

Egyptian Asbestos Workers Dying of Cancer
by Aaron Glantz, Special to CorpWatch
January 13th, 2005
Workers at Aura-Misr, a Spanish-Egyptian asbestos company in Cairo, have been laid off since Christmas, after a ban on asbestos took effect in the country. Many of the fired workers have been diagnosed with cancer and they worry that other workers may soon fall ill and die also.

Boeing Scandal Part of Deeper Problems at Pentagon
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
January 5th, 2005
Military contractors like Boeing, Halliburton and Lockheed, have become increasingly embedded with the Pentagon bureaucrats who give them lucrative work as the jailing of Darleen Druyun, a former U.S. Air Force weapons buyer, demonstrates.

Iraq Contractor Claims Immunity From Fraud Laws
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
December 23rd, 2004
A Virginia judge has been asked to decided whether or not Custer Battles, an upstart security company assigned to guard Baghdad airport, had defrauded its customers by as much as $50 million. But company lawyers are arguing that the United States government did not control the Iraqi oil money, seized during the occupation, used to pay the company.

Paving the Amazon with Soy
by Sasha LilleySpecial to CorpWatch
December 16th, 2004
Soy rules the central Brazilian state of Mato Grosso and it's not the soy that much of the world associates with the ostensibly eco-friendly, vegetarian diet, either. With help from the World Bank, André Maggi (the Soy King) is bankrolling the destruction of one of the world's most biodiverse ecosystems: the savanna.

“Contract Meals Disaster" for Iraqi Prisoners
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
December 9th, 2004
New evidence suggests that the Abu Ghraib prisoners were subjected not only to torture and psychological abuse, they were underfed, malnourished and made to eat food so bad it inspired riots. A little-known private contractor, run by an American civilian, is said to be to blame.

Dynamite in the Center of Town
by Joshua KarlinerSpecial to CorpWatch
December 2nd, 2004
In 1984 the world's largest industrial disaster killed 8,000 people over night in Bhopal, India. Two decades later, some sort of closure might seem called for. But today survivors groups continue to struggle for justice, while the chemical industry promotes volunteer initiatives.

Clouds on the Organic Horizon
by Carmelo Ruiz-MarreroSpecial to CorpWatch
November 25th, 2004
Until a decade ago, organic foods were available only through tiny farmers markets, health and natural food stores, but today their growing popularity means that more organic food is now sold by chain stores like Whole Foods. Often, the food itself is grown on corporate-owned farms, no longer synonymous with small farms, rural communities, social justice and humane treatment of animals.

Cooking the Insurance Books
by Lucy KomisarSpecial to CorpWatch
November 17th, 2004
As New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer charges American International Group (AIG) executives with collusion in an insurance brokerage kickback scandal, a paper trail stretching back a decade reveals that AIG used offshore shell companies to skirt the law.

Kuwait Documents Allege Halliburton Bribe Scandal
by David PhinneySpecial to Corpwatch
November 11th, 2004
Newly revealed documents, dating from December 2003 and the early months of 2004, allege that Halliburton staff in Kuwait asked for kickbacks from selected contractors while undermining others who were looking for work from the multi-billion dollar contracts that the company oversees for the military occupation force in Iraq.

Agent Orange Victims Sue Monsanto
by Tom FawthropSpecial to CorpWatch
November 4th, 2004
Vietnamese Association of Victims of Agent Orange (VAVA) filed a class action law suit in a New York court, against Monsanto and 36 other manufacturers of Agent Orange.

Halliburton Hit with Multiple Lawsuits
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
October 27th, 2004
Companies working in support of U.S. troops in Iraq are hauling Houston-headquartered defense contractor, Halliburton, into U.S. federal court with claims that the company stiffed them for hundreds of millions of dollars after they provided essential services in the war effort.

Darfur Diplomacy: Enter the Contractors
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
October 21st, 2004
Rwandan and Nigerian soldiers will arrive in western Sudan this week as the first deployment of a five nation 4,500 strong peacekeeping force dispatched from the African Union headquarters in Addis Ababa to stem the violence in Darfur. Providing logistical support for the mission will be two private contractors from California, both of whom have mixed records carrying out similar enterprises in the past.

Iraq Contractor Accused of Offshore Shell Game
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
October 14th, 2004
Former managers working for Custer Battles, a high-profile private security company in Iraq, are accusing the firm of using companies in the Cayman Islands and other “tax haven” countries to fraudulently overcharge on government contracts by tens of millions of dollars.

Banking on Elections
by Lucy KomisarSpecial to Corpwatch
October 6th, 2004
Finance sector invests heavily in candidates When former Texas Senator Phil Gramm came out of the Tavern on the Green one recent August morning, his disposition turned edgy. Now a vice chairman of the Swiss financial corporation UBS, he had just left his colleagues at the Financial Services Roundtable breakfast. He wasn't keen on talking to waiting journalists, certainly not to the CorpWatch team.

"Rigged from the Beginning"
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
September 30th, 2004
A once secret Halliburton oil contract raked in billions long after the Army said the work would be competitively bid. As of September 2004 Halliburton billed over $2.5 billion. A Bechtel whistleblower calls the bidding process to break up the work, "a sham."

Iraq's Private Warriors
Facts and figures on: congressional budget allocations vs. actual expenditures; pay scales for Iraqi and foreign personnel; and comparisons of equipment ordered for Iraq and equipment delivered.

Leaving Children Behind
by Ben ClarkeSpecial to CorpWatch
September 23rd, 2004
Exam privatization threatens public schools "They make kids in my class feel dumb," says Vanessa Verdín about the corporate-designed standardized tests that millions of U.S. students are required to take under the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). Vanessa, an energetic eleven year old whose hobbies include soccer, knitting and research, feels that the tests "ask the wrong questions" and "waste time when we could be learning."

Prison Interrogation for Profit
by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
September 15th, 2004
Private contractors face legal action for crimes in Abu Ghraib Employees of two high-profile defense contractors are accused of involvement in close to one third of the torture and abuse incidents cited in a recent Army investigation of Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq.

No Competition
Former Bechtel consultant portrays Halliburton bidding process as a “sham”

by David PhinneySpecial to CorpWatch
September 14th, 2004
Sheryl Elam Tappan, former Bechtel Consultant, tells a special panel of congressional Democrats, “Officials up and down the chain of command ignored our federal laws and regulations and the procedures that normally ensure fair play.”

November Surprise
by Stephen MillerSpecial to Corpwatch
September 8th, 2004
Electronic Voting Machines Add Uncertainty to Close Election Race Across the U.S., dozens of election commissions, county clerks and voting registrars are scrambling to maintain public confidence in an election system shaken by the Florida 2000 debacle and challenged by security flaws in hi-tech electronic solutions. In the swing states, where the presidential election is expected to be close, 14 of 20 states will be experimenting with untested technology.

Swing States and Electronic Voting Machines
September 7th, 2004

CorpWatch Covers the Conventions
From New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg's Time-Warner extravaganza to New Mexico Senator Pete Domenici's connections to nuclear and fossil fuel companies, CorpWatch joins with Democracy Now! to reveal the facts, figures, and faces the corporate media won't cover.

Corporate Donations to Republican Convention to Reach $160 Million.
by Bill MeslerSpecial to CorpWatch
August 31st, 2004
The extravagant spectacle is expected to dwarf the record $95 million spent by Democrats this year. In fact, the Republicans will spend more than the $130 million raised by Al Gore for his entire 2000 campaign.

Media Money
by Sakura Saunders and Ben ClarkeSpecial to CorpWatch
August 25th, 2004
Media corporations give millions, receive billions. The cost for two weeks of ad-driven debate on Kerry's military record cost almost $1 million. Political advertising will bring over $1.5 billion to media corporations this election season. In turn they will invest millions in campaign contributions and lobbying. Meanwhile, substantive political coverage continues to decline.

Privatizing Hope
August 19th, 2004
Ten years after the first democratic elections in South Africa brought the African National Congress to power, critics claim that privatization and neoliberal economic policies have usurped the promise of democracy.
Soweto Resists Privatization Moves
Trevor Ngwane/Walter Turner
ANC Privatizations Fail to Deliver in South Africa, Patrick Bond

Soweto Resists ANC Privatization Moves
by Walter Turner: Interview with Trevor NgwaneAfrica Today
August 18th, 2004
From illegal reconnection to the electrical grid, "Operation Khanyisa" to refusal of pre-pair water meters, South Africa's largest black township fights back.

ANC Privatizations Fail to Deliver in South Africa
by Patrick BondSpecial to Corpwatch
August 18th, 2004
"Privatization can only worsen conditions for the majority. The reality of the Telkom sale is that property is being expropriated from 46 million South Africans to be auctioned off to, at best, 1 million 'investors' in the name of black economic empowerment."

Sweating for the Olympics
by Sasha Lilley, Special to CorpWatch
August 11th, 2004
Behind the five intertwined rings of the Athens games, underpaid workers are sewing the shirts, gluing the shoes, and putting zippers to running suits and track apparel branded as Olympic--in working conditions that would make even the most highly trained athlete sweat.

Information Warriors
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
August 4th, 2004
Rendon Group Wins Hearts and Minds in Business, Politics and War The Rendon Group is a consulting firm whose services range from creating "a favorable environment before privatization begins" to helping justify war. Rick Rendon, a founding partner talks to CorpWatch about his latest project, "Empowering Peace."

Up in Smoke
by Chris BerdikSpecial to Corpwatch
July 28th, 2004
Tobacco Industry Saves on Soft Money, Spends On Advertising and Lobbyists The quadrennial special-interest cash race is on. Although the McCain-Feingold Act has blocked some of the flow, the political system is still awash with tobacco dollars.

Financing the Election
by Bill MeslerSpecial to CorpWatch
July 22nd, 2004
John Kerry will accept the Democratic nomination to run for United States President at the Fleet Center, a sports and entertainment arena named after the powerful FleetBoston Corporation, the biggest donor to Kerry's Congressional career.

A Cabinet That Looks Like (Corporate) America
by Bill MeslerSpecial to CorpWatch
Increasingly, the highest of government officials arrive directly from the executive offices of powerful corporations. Those who regulate and those supposed to be regulated have become almost indistinguishable. Here are a few egregious examples.

Stalled Case Against ExxonMobil Sees Movement
by Jacqueline KochSpecial to CorpWatch
July 14th, 2004
After languishing in the courts for two years, a lawsuit that accuses ExxonMobil of complicity in human rights violations is beginning to move, thanks to the Supreme Court's recent decision to uphold the Alien Tort Claims Act.

Not in Their Backyard
by Jacqueline KochSpecial to CorpWatch
July 14th, 2004
Legal experts, activists, and analysts weigh impact of Supreme Court decision to uphold the Alien Tort Claims Act, commonly used by human rights groups to try cases against U.S. corporations on American soil.

Corporations Fight to Avoid Accountability
by Stephen R. Miller Special to CorpWatch
July 7th, 2004
Two years after Congress enacted the sweeping corporate-accountability act known as "SOX," corporate officials are hoping their complaints will take the teeth out of the legislation's power to regulate.

Teaching Democracy, Texas Style
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
July 1st, 2004

Selections, Not Elections
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
July 1st, 2004
The system od "selections, not elections" disenfranchises many local people. It was pioneered by North Carolina-based Research Triangle Institute (RTI) International, which won a $167 million United States Agency for International Development (USAID) contract,

Inventing Iraqi Democracy in North Carolina
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
July 1st, 2004
Former employees of RTI, a North Carolina company with a $167 million military contract to teach Iraqis about democracy, say the company failed in its task.

Sweet and Sour
by Jim LobeSpecial to CorpWatch
June 23rd, 2004
A new report from Human Rights Watch reveals that American corporations such as Coca-Cola may be getting sugar from plantations in El Salvador that employ child labor.

New Halliburton Whistleblowers Say Millions Wasted in Iraq
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
June 16th, 2004
According to a new GAO report and congressional testimoney from former Halliburton employees, the company encouraged waste and supported overcharging for Iraq contract work.

Give War a Chance: the Life and Times of Tim Spicer
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
June 9th, 2004
Strange or villianous, Tim Spicer's business partners over the years, have found themselves in hot water from Canada to Papua New Guinea and Zimbabwe, although he has always somehow managed to avoid prosecution.

From Embassy Hero to Racing Disgrace
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
June 9th, 2004
In order to restore the reputation of the venerable British institution, in March 2002, Phipps launched dawn raids on five National Hunt trainers--including nine-time champion Martin Pipe--to investigate whether the trainers were illegally plying the horses with the blood-boosting drug erythropoieitin.

Ex-SAS Men Cash in on Iraq Bonanza
by Pratap Chatterjee
June 9th, 2004
Many of the best-paid private security contracts in Iraq are managed by a small group of British ex-soldiers who served in the Special Air Services (SAS), an elite regiment of commandos that is considered one of the best special force units in the world.

Controversial Commando Wins Iraq Contract
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
June 9th, 2004
A new Iraq contract to create the world's largest private army goes to a company run by Tim Spicer, a former officer with an elite regiment of British commandos who has a questionable track record.

Landmine of a Decision
by Michael McCrystalSpecial to CorpWatch
May 28th, 2004
Much is at stake for the people, economy, and environment of Namibia, where Rossing Uranium is deciding between ceasing operations or spending $100 million on a 20-year expansion of one of the world's largest mines.

Barren Justice
by Sasha LilleySpecial to CorpWatch
May 13th, 2004
Nicaraguan banana workers have been struggling for compensation from Dole Fruit, Shell, and Dow Chemical for exposure to the pesticide DBCP. The obstacles to justice are many, including the US courts, powerful lobbies, and free trade agreements.

Private Contractors and Torture at Abu Ghraib
by Pratap Chatterjee and A.C. ThompsonSpecial to CorpWatch
May 7th, 2004
Two private military contractors are being investigated for their role in torture allegations at the Abu Ghraib prison, Iraq: CACI from Arlington, Virginia, and Titan of San Diego, California.

Titan's Translators in Trouble
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
May 7th, 2004
Titan corporation of San Diego, California, one of the two companies accused of complicity in the prison abuse scandal in Abu Ghraib, Iraq, is currently facing numerous federal investigations for work done in Iraq and around the world.

Private Contractors and Torture at Abu Ghraib, Iraq
by Pratap Chatterjee and A.C. ThompsonSpecial to CorpWatch
May 7th, 2004
Two private military contractors are being investigated for their role in torture allegations at the Abu Ghraib prison, Iraq: CACI from Arlington, Virginia, and Titan of San Diego, California.

Titan's Translators in Trouble
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
May 6th, 2004
Titan corporation of San Diego, California, one of the two companies accused of complicity in the prison abuse scandal in Abu Ghraib, Iraq, is currently facing numerous federal investigations for work done in Iraq and around the world.

The Spin Doctor Is In: Examining Corporate PR at Bechtel
by A.C. ThompsonSpecial to CorpWatch
April 28th, 2004
In the face of criticism over its controversial construction projects, Bechtel has taken media manipulation to the next level, employing a three-pronged approach to weaving a rosy story for the public and investors.

Poison and Profits
by Chris ThompsonEast Bay Express
April 7th, 2004
First California semiconductor firm AXT, Inc. exposed its workers to arsenic. Then it fired them and sent their jobs to China.

Mercenary Boom in Iraq Creates Tension at Home and Abroad
by Aaron GlantzSpecial to CorpWatch
March 23rd, 2004
Kurdish mercenaries are on the frontline of the burgeoning security business in Iraq, easily the fastest growing business sector in the country. Yet the boom may be heightening ethnic tensions there.

The Smell of Money: British Columbia's Gas Rush
by Shefa SiegelSpecial to CorpWatch
March 13th, 2004
In Canada's British Columbia, ExxonMobil, Talisman, Shell, and other energy giants are racing to tap the region's "sour gas". But the potential toxicity of the gas is being ignored.

ASIA: Storm Over Asian-Pacific Timber Trade
by Yoon Szu-MaeSpecial to CorpWatch
March 5th, 2004
Rimbunan Hijau, a billion-dollar business owned by Malaysian tycoon Tiong Hiew King, has been engaging in illegal logging in South East Asia, while local governments turn a blind eye.

Argentina Water Privatization Scheme Runs Dry
by Sebastian HacherSpecial to CorpWatch
February 26th, 2004
Rio de la Plata is one of the few rivers of the world whose pollution can be seen from space. Making matters worse is the privatized water company Aguas Argentinas, which dumps sewage into the river a few kilometers from where it treats water for drinking.

Money for Nothing and Calls for Free
by Nidhi Kumar and Nidhi VergheseSpecial to CorpWatch
February 17th, 2004
As the outsourcing of jobs has become a hot election year issue in the US, call centers in India continue to multiply. Local workers answer calls for US corporations at a fraction of the cost of an American worker.

Operation Sweatshop Iraq
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
February 12th, 2004
Halliburton is hiring temps to work in Iraq: $100 a month for locals, $300 for Indians and $8,000 for Texans. Meanwhile taxpayers are getting charged top dollar, prompting investigations from the United States military.

Banking on Empire
by Mitch JeserichSpecial to CorpWatch
February 4th, 2004
Iraqi ministries will now be able to borrow billions of dollars to buy much-needed equipment from overseas suppliers, but only by mortgaging the national oil revenues through a bank managed by JP Morgan Chase.

Coke with Yet Another New Twist: Toxic Cola
by Amit SrivastavaSpecial to CorpWatch
January 17th, 2004
As the World Social Forum opens in Mumbai, India, the spotlight has been turned on Coca-Cola and Pepsi, whose products have been found to be laden with pesticides and insecticides.

Information Warfare or Yesterday's News?
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
January 6th, 2004
Science Applications International Corporation has a contract with the Pentagon to run the Iraqi Media Network's Al Iraqiya radio and television station. But Iraqis aren't tuning in.

Conservation at All Costs
by Shefa SiegelSpecial to CorpWatch
December 22nd, 2003
Conservation International is working to protect endangered species in Guyana, but in practice may have fomented conflict between tribes there.

The Troubled Marriage of Environmentalists and Oil Companies
Carmelo Ruiz-Marrero reports on CI's questionable partnerships.


The Troubled Marriage of Environmentalists and Oil Companies
by Carmelo Ruiz-MarreroSpecial to CorpWatch
December 22nd, 2003
The American environmental group Conservation International (CI) and other environmental organizations are actively collaborating with oil corporations in hopes of ameliorating the impact of their activities on local ecosystems. But observers fear that the cozy relationship that these groups have with the US government and oil companies raises serious questions regarding their independence and warn that it can undermine the grassroots work of popular movements and native peoples that aim to stop new oil drilling altogether. They also hold that it raises some serious issues regarding national sovereignty in the Global South.

Umm Qasr -- From National Pride to War Booty
by David BaconSpecial to CorpWatch
December 15th, 2003
The Iraqi port of Umm Qasr -- once a crown jewel of the Iraqi economy -- is now a symbol of a new era of foreign domination. It's run by SSA, a politically-connected firm with an ugly history of anti-labor policies.

Jordanian Privatization Extended to the Dead Sea
by Oula Al FarawatiSpecial to CorpWatch
December 9th, 2003
Jordan is selling its stake in the flagship Arab Potash Company to the Canadian potash giant PCS as part of privatization efforts spearheaded by USAID.

Bechtel Fails Reconstruction of Iraq's Schools
by Karim El-GawharySpecial to CorpWatch
December 2nd, 2003
Bechtel has been awarded a contract by USAID for the reconstruction of Iraq's schools, as part of a deal worth up to $1.03 billion. But the question remains whether Bechtel, like the US army, is part of the solution or part of the problem.

Mapuche Lands in Patagonia Taken Over by Benetton Wool Farms
by Sebastian Hacher and Pauline BartoloneSpecial to CorpWatch
November 25th, 2003
To the Mapuche Indians in southern Argentina, the Italian clothing manufacturer Benetton is the newest conquistador in 10,000 years of land struggles in Patagonia.

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Robert Zoellick's Free Trade Evangelism
by Toni SoloSpecial to CorpWatch
November 17th, 2003
Free trade advocates and multinational corporations are pinning their hopes on Robert Zoellick, the United States trade representative, as negotiators from around the two continents gather in Miami for the Free Trade of the Americas talks.

BAE System's Dirty Dealings
by Sasha LilleySpecial to CorpWatch
November 11th, 2003
BAE Systems has been accused of operating a $33.4 million slush fund to procure prostitutes, sports cars, and other enticements in connection with the biggest transaction in UK history -- the Al-Yamamah arms-for-oil deal with the Saudi royal family.

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Bolivian President Falls Over Gas Sale to California
by Jim ShultzSpecial to CorpWatch
October 22nd, 2003
Bolivia has been rocked by protests against a proposed gas pipeline to be built by Pacific LNG. The consortium is made up of notorious British and Spanish multinationals, including BP and Repsol-YPF.

Clear Channel Rewrites Rules of Radio Broadcasting
by Dante TozaSpecial to CorpWatch
October 8th, 2003
At the annual meeting of the National Association of Broadcasters, Clear Channel kept a low profile. Yet its impact on media diversity is anything but casual -- it owns roughly one in every ten radio stations in the United States.

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Private Company Manages Daily Bombing of Korean Village
by Aaron GlantzSpecial to CorpWatch
September 27th, 2003
Six days a week, US military fighter planes drop bombs a mile from the South Korean village of Maehyang-ri. The bombing range isn't run by the US Air Force and it isn't run by the US Army. It's been privatized and is under the management of Arctic Slope World Service.

Cancun Round Collapses
by Dan JaffeeSpecial to CorpWatch
September 15th, 2003
WTO negotiations collapsed in Cancun amid deep divisions between the US, EU and Japan on one side and the Group of 23, led by Brazil, South Africa, India and China, on the other.

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MEXICO: Will Agricultural Issues Derail WTO Talks?
by Tim RussoSpecial to Corp Watch
September 10th, 2003
A show down is taking place at the WTO over agricultural issues that pits northern countries against the global south and small farmers against worldwide agribusiness.

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MEXICO: Suez' World Water Wars
by Deepa FernandesSpecial to CorpWatch
September 9th, 2003
The latest battle in the war over privatization is being fought at the WTO negotiations in Cancun.

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Guarding the Oil Underworld in Iraq
by Jim Vallette and Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
September 5th, 2003
When saboteurs struck the vital Kirkuk-Ceyhan pipeline in northern Iraq recently, the United States government announced that a company called Erinys would be brought in to train 6,500 Iraqis to guard oil pipelines, wellheads, and refineries.

AES Backs Out of Bujagali Dam Project
by Sasha LilleySpecial to CorpWatch
August 28th, 2003
The future of a World Bank-sponsored dam scheme at Bujagali Falls on the Victoria Nile in eastern Uganda has been thrown into question with the withdrawal of energy giant AES Corporation from the project.

Bush Turns Blind Eye to Blackout Culprit
by Tyson SlocumSpecial to CorpWatch
August 21st, 2003
An Ohio-based energy conglomerate is responsible for the massive power blackout that shut down much of the Midwest and Northeast -- and its chief executives rank among Bush's top campaign fundraisers.

To the Victors Go the Spoils of War
by Pratap Chatterjee and Oula Al FarawatiCorpWatch
August 8th, 2003
Critics claim that the motive for the invasion of Iraq was control of Iraqi oil. And if the bonanza in oil contracts won by giant oil companies is any indication, Washington is moving swiftly to secure access to Iraq's oil wealth once and for all.

World Bank Knew About Enron's Payoffs in Guatemala
by Jim ValletteSpecial to CorpWatch
August 1st, 2003
A U.S. Senate Committee report found that the World Bank and U.S. taxpayer-backed institutions financed "questionable payments" by Enron for a Guatemalan power project.

Halliburton Milks British Nuclear Submarines for Millions
by Solomon HughesSpecial to CorpWatch
July 25th, 2003
Halliburton is giving the Brits the royal shaft by embarking on multi-million dollar privatization schemes for the British military, starting with the nuclear subs at Devonport Royal Dockyards.

Talking Back to the Ganglords
by Ted NaceGangs of America
July 18th, 2003
Computer giant Intel lost a major lawsuit against a fired employee who sent email protest letters to his former colleagues, in a court decision that is a major victory for free speech and workers' rights.

Coke in Varanasi: Facing Local Ire
by AflatoonIndia Resource Center
July 10th, 2003
On the 10th of May, 2003 about 100 people held a demonstration at the plant gate. Nearly 200 police personnel were deputed by the district authorities to 'protect' the plant along with 50 gun toting private security guards. While this agitation was suppressed by beating up the demonstrators to disperse them, local inhabitants are geared for a long struggle against the cola giant.

Coca-Cola: Continuing the Battle in Kerala
by Surendranath CIndia Resource Center
July 10th, 2003
Plachimada, (Palakkad district) Kerala: The Coca Cola story in Plachimada is reminiscent of David versus the mighty Goliath. In the latest twist to the tale, the Kerala Government through the Secretary, Local Self Government Department (LSGD) has stayed the Perumatty Grama Panchayat's decision not to renew the license issued to the Hindustan Coca Cola Beverages Ltd.

Communities Reject Coca-Cola in India
by Amit SrivastavaIndia Resource Center
July 10th, 2003
Coca-Cola is in trouble in India. Communities have been fighting the multinational for depleting the groundwater and contaminating what's left. A Special Series from the India Resource Center.

Enron Style Corporate Crime and Privatization
by Darren PuscasPolaris Institute
June 20th, 2003
An inside look at the U.S. Coalition of Service Industries (USCSI), the major driving force behind the scenes pushing for the privatization of services, including public services.

The Stalemate in the WTO
by Walden Bello and Aileen KwaFocus on the Global South
June 11th, 2003
An in-depth analysis of the WTO's flaws, the roots of globalization and what they mean for the upcoming WTO Summit in Cancun.

Bechtel: Profiting from Destruction
by CorpWatch, Global Exchange, Public CitizenCollaborative Report
June 5th, 2003
In this collaborative report we look at Bechtel's history of operations in the water, nuclear, energy and public works sectors.

Media Diversity at Risk
by Mafruza KhanCorporate Research Project
May 29th, 2003
In June the FCC will vote on regulations that could dramatically change media ownership laws, endangering localism, diversity, and competition in US media.

Partial Chronology of Union Carbide's Bhopal Disaster
by Helene VostersSpecial to CorpWatch
May 15th, 2003
Dec. 2-3, 1984: Gas spill at the Union Carbide pesticide factory in Bhopal kills 8,000 in first three days. Over 120,000 injured.

An Unreasonable Woman
by Helene VostersSpecial to CorpWatch
May 15th, 2003
Diane Wilson, a fourth-generation shrimper, is a long time environmental justice activist and adversary to corporate polluters like Union Carbide and Dow Chemical. In the early 1980's after witnessing dolphin die-offs, decreased fish catches, and increased health problems in her home-town of Seadrift, Texas, Wilson discovered that she lived in the most polluted county (Calhoun) in the U.S.

Bhopal Survivors Confront Dow
by Helene VostersSpecial to CorpWatch
May 15th, 2003
Almost 19 years after the Bhopal gas disaster in India, survivors still seek Justice. Recently they confronted the CEO of Dow Chemical at a shareholders' meeting.

Bechtel's Water Wars
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
May 1st, 2003
In November 2001 Bechtel sued the country of Bolivia for $25 million for canceling a contract to run the water system of Cochabamba, the third largest city in the country, after local people took to the streets to protest massive price hikes for water.

Bechtel's Nuclear Nightmares
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
May 1st, 2003
In part II of this special series, we look at the environmental and human rights impacts of just a few Bechtel ventures in nuclear, water and mining.

Bechtel Wins Iraq War Contracts
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
April 24th, 2003
In this special investigative series we look at Bechtel's friends in high places, the revolving door between government and the corporate giant and some of its past boondoggles.

From Business Executive to Peace Activist
by Julie LightCorpWatch
April 17th, 2003
Warren Langley, former President of the Pacific Stock Exchange, talks with CorpWatch about his sojourn from the executive suites to activism in the streets.

Dyncorp Rent-a-Cops May Head to Post-Saddam Iraq
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
April 9th, 2003
A major military contractor - already underfire for alleged human rights violations and fraud - may get a multi-million dollar contract to police post-Saddam Iraq.

Busting the Water Cartel
by Holly Wren SpauldingSpecial to CorpWatch
March 27th, 2003
A report from inside the World Water Forum on the showdown between water privatizers and human rights activists.

Vinnell, Brown and Root at Turkey's Incirlik Airbase
by Pratap Chatterjee and Sasha LilleySpecial to CorpWatch
March 20th, 2003
Brown and Root's role at Incirlik began on October 1, 1988 when the company won its first contract to run support services at the base in collaboration with Vinnell corporation of Virginia. The contracts also included providing services at two more minor military sites in Turkey: Ankara and Izmir.

Halliburton Makes a Killing on Iraq War
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
March 20th, 2003
CorpWatch has learned that VP Cheney's former company has a $multi-million contract servicing troops in Kuwait. This special series looks at how Halliburton profits from the Iraq war, now that bombs are falling on Baghdad.

Indigenous Struggle in Ecuador Becomes a "Cause Beyond Control"
by Kenny BrunoEarthRights International
March 13th, 2003
Ecuador's government recently ruled indigenous opposition to Amazon oil development a "cause beyond control." That leaves the companies free to pull out. It could also be an excuse to step up repression.

Farmers Fight to Keep Monsanto's Genetically Modified Wheat Out of Canada
by Tom PriceSpecial to CorpWatch
March 5th, 2003
A coaliton of farmers is fighting to keep Monsanto's "Roundup Ready Wheat" out of Canada. They say GM contamination would threaten exports.

Jordan's Sweatshops: The Carrot or the Stick of US Policy?
by Aaron GlantzSpecial to CorpWatch
February 26th, 2003
While the world braces for a US war against Iraq, Washington is using its newly inked Free Trade Agreement with Jordan to open sweatshops and secure an ally in the region.

Sweat-Free School Purchasing Resolutions: A New Trend?
by Ben PlimptonSpecial to CorpWatch
February 6th, 2003
School Districts and city governments are promising to purchase "sweat-free" uniforms and sports equipment. Organizers say the grassroots initiatives are a cutting edge in the fight against sweatshops.

World Contrasts
by Eduardo Galeanowww.portoalegre2003.org
January 16th, 2003
Next week, thousands will descend on Porto Alegre, Brazil for the World Social Forum, under the slogan "Another World is Possible." We thought these reflections by Uruguayan writer Eduardo Galeano on the world as it is today were a good place to start.

West Coast Dockworkers: Victory in the Face of the Bush Doctrine
by David BaconSpecial to Corpwatch
January 2nd, 2003
West Coast Dockers negotiate a contract despite federal intervention on the side of business. But the Bush administration has fired a warning shot at labor.

Tension in Paradise
by Tom PriceSpecial to CorpWatch
December 3rd, 2002
Tuvalu is like many places brushing up against development, simultaneously simple and complex. Island life hums along here, a small place where everyone knows everyone else, where children ask visitors names, and remember them days or weeks later.

CLEAR CHANNEL: the Media Mammoth that Stole the Airwaves
by Jeff PerlsteinSpecial to CorpWatch
November 14th, 2002
Clear Channel leads the way in undermining media diversity in the US. Now, citizens are fighting back.

Unity Platform on Corporate Accountability
US Based Global Justice Groups
October 29th, 2002
Some 200 US-Based social and environmental justice groups call for corporate accountability. Among their ten point demands: campaign finance reform and an end to corporate welfare.

Climate Justice Summit Program
CorpWatch
October 25th, 2002
Climate Justice Summit, October 26-28, 2002, Constitution Club, Rafi Marg, New Delhi. Program

Clouds Over Global Warming
by by C.E. KarunakaranTamilnadu Science Forum
October 24th, 2002
"I'm not going to let the United States carry the burden for cleaning up the world's air," declared the US presidential candidate George W. Bush, in October 2000. "Only for poisoning it the most," he might have added, had he wanted to be completely truthful; as truthful as, say, Andrew Kerr of the World Wildlife Fund: "The United States is responsible for almost half of the increase in world carbon dioxide in the past decade. That increase is greater than the increase in China, India, Africa and the whole of Latin America." This minor fact would not, of course, deter President Bush from complaining that the Kyoto Protocol, the global compact on dealing with global warming "... exempts 80% of the world, including major population centres such as China and India," as he pulled his country out of the Kyoto process, within a few months of taking office.

Nuclear Renaissance or Nuclear Nightmare?
by Karl GrossmanSpecial to CorpWatch
October 23rd, 2002
Thought the nuclear power industry was dead? Guess again. Industry leaders met to launch a "renaissance" with help from the White House. Check out this CorpWatch exclusive.

Iraq and the Axis of Oil
by Maria Elena Martinez and Joshua KarlinerCorpWatch
October 23rd, 2002
In this CorpWatch Opinion, we look at the connection between the looming war in Iraq, corporate crime in America and control of the world's oil supply.

International Tobacco Treaty: Public Health Advocates Face an Uphill Battle
by Clive BatesSpecial to CorpWatch
October 15th, 2002
Can public interest groups salvage an international treaty aimed at regulating Big Tobacco? The director of an anti-tobacco group says they have their work cut out for them.

Precision Farming: The Marriage Between Agribusiness and Spy Technology
by Carmelo Ruiz-MarreroSpecial to CorpWatch
October 2nd, 2002
Precision farming: high tech corporate responsibility or agribusiness expansion? We look at the use of satellites and new technology in farming.

The Lacandon Jungle's Last Stand Against Corporate Globalization
by Ryan ZinnSpecial to CorpWatch
September 26th, 2002
A battle is raging in Chiapas, Mexico to protect rainforest biodiversity and indigenous rights. Both are threatend by the Plan Puebla Panama.

PPP: Plan Puebla Panama, or Private Plans for Profit?
by Miguel PickardSpecial to CorpWatch
September 19th, 2002
A primer on the development scheme that would turn southern Mexico and all of Central America into a giant export zone.

September 11th Didn't Change Everything
by Kenny BrunoCorpWatch
September 10th, 2002
A New Yorker looks at the squandered opportunities to make desperately needed changes in the American psyche and global policy following last September 11th.

Women's Protests Against ChevronTexaco Spread Through the Niger Delta
by Sam OlukoyaSpecial to CorpWatch
August 7th, 2002
Women recently occupied ChevronTexaco facilities throughout the Niger Delta. Their initial demands have been met, but issues remain.

Will Congress Investigate US Agencies' Enron Ties?
by Jim ValletteSpecial to CorpWatch
August 1st, 2002
The Senate is investigating the role of private investment banks in the Enron scandal. Could public institutions, like the World Bank and the Export-Import Bank be next?

Bush: Corporate Confidence Man
by Charlie Cray and Lee DrutmanSpecial to CorpWatch
July 10th, 2002
Bush's Corporate Responsibility plan is pretty anemic -- not what you'd expect from a president desperate to keep the current crisis from becoming a major political liability.

George and Dick's Amazing Corporate Misadventures
by Stephen PizzoSpecial to CorpWatch
July 10th, 2002
Has the avalanche of corporate revelations left your head spinning? Investigative journalist Stephen Pizzo offers a cheat sheet to scandals plaguing the White House.

A Tale of Two Coups: Venezuela and Argentina
by Greg PalastNew Internationalist Magazine
July 3rd, 2002
April's big business-led coup in Venezuela failed, where international finance's coup in Argentina in recent months has succeeded. Greg Palast gives us the inside track on two very different power-grabs.

Afghan Pipe Dreams
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
June 28th, 2002
Is the US War on Terrorism in Afghanistan really a war for a natural gas pipeline? Fossil fuel corporations and the World Bank are expressing cautious interest. Activists are concerned.

Edison's Failing Grade
by Tali WoodwardSpecial to CorpWatch
June 20th, 2002
For-profit school manager Edison Schools Inc. promoted itself as the savior of American public education. Now, the company is struggling for its own survival.

Sempra: Exporting Pollution
by J.P. Ross, GreenpeaceSpecial to CorpWatch
May 27th, 2002
San Diego-based Sempra Energy is dodging US environmental laws by building power plants in Mexico -- and shipping the electricity back to California.

Report Alleges US Role in Angola Arms-for-Oil Scandal
by Wayne MadsenSpecial to CorpWatch
May 17th, 2002
Did US officials and oil companies play a role in international arms-for-oil scandal?

Enron's Pipe Scheme
by Jimmy LangmanSpecial to CorpWatch
May 9th, 2002
Enron's Cuiaba gas pipeline project, built with US government support, is an ecological and social disaster. Jimmy Langman reports from Bolivia.

The War on Terrorism's Gravy Train
by Pratap ChatterjeeSpecial to CorpWatch
May 2nd, 2002
The U.S. military has always relied on private contractors for basic services, but today nearly 10 percent of the emergency U.S. army operations overseas are contracted out to unaccountable private corporations.

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