Contact l Sitemap

home industries issues reasearch weblog press

Home  » Campaigns » Past Campaigns » Climate Justice Initiative

USA: The Unimog, Daimler's New Polluter

Deutsche Presse-Agentur
February 22nd, 2001

NEW YORK -- Residents of the United States, renowned for their love of large cars, will soon have a bigger and better version of the road hog.

DaimlerChrysler announced plans Wednesday to produce a version of the German military vehicle, the Unimog, for sale in the United States, with production planned to begin in January.

The super-sports utility vehicle - to be made by DaimlerChrysler's subsidiary Freightliner, the largest tractor-trailer producer in the United States - is to look more like a freighter than a family car, news reports said.

The vehicle, which will look like an enormous off-road truck, will weigh 27,555 kilograms, almost double the heft of the largest SUVs, and measure 2.9 metres tall. Drivers will use a three-step ladder to climb behind the wheel.

It will stretch 6 metres from stem to stern and will be 60 centimetres wider than the average car. It will even make General Motor's Hummer SUV look puny.

Freightliner plans to produce 1,000 Unimogs annually at 84,000 dollars a pop. About 250 of those will be luxuriously outfitted for personal use while the rest will be sold to fire departments and businesses for commercial use.

The gas mileage of the new Unimogs - which will travel just more than 4 kilometres on a litre of petrol - was criticized by environmentalists.

"With new dire warnings from scientists about the consequences of global warming, we should be looking for ways to reduce emissions from U.S. sources," said Dan Becker, director of the Sierra Club. "... Daimler is making the problem worse with their new Daimler- saurus."

The Unimogs have been produced since the 1950s in Europe and are used primarily for heavy hauling.





This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of environmental, political, human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues, etc. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.