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Intelligence : Displaying 72-78 of 78


Iraq: CACI Contracts Blocked
by Ellen McCarthyWashington Post
May 26th, 2004
The Interior Department's inspector general is reviewing the contracting procedures that allowed the Army to hire civilian interrogators in Iraq and has blocked the Army from using the contract to place new orders with Arlington-based CACI International Inc., an agency spokesman said yesterday.

Iraq: Contractors Implicated in Prison Abuse Remain on the Job
by  Joel Brinkley and James GlanzNew York Times
May 4th, 2004
More than two months after a classified Army report found that two contract workers were implicated in the abuse of Iraqis at a prison outside Baghdad, the companies that employ them say that they have heard nothing from the Pentagon, and that they have not removed any employees from Iraq.

Iraq: CACI to Open Probe of Workers
by By Renae Merle and Ellen McCarthyWashington Post
May 3rd, 2004
Defense contractor CACI International Inc. said yesterday it launched an independent investigation of its employees in connection with allegations that Iraqi detainees were abused by U.S. soldiers at an Army-run prison in Iraq.

Iraq: Prisoner Abuse Appears More Extensive
by T. Christian MillerLos Angeles Times
May 2nd, 2004
At least one Iraqi prisoner died after interrogation, some were threatened with attack dogs and others were kept naked in tiny cells without running water or ventilation, according to an account written by a military police sergeant who is one of six U.S. soldiers charged in a growing scandal over prisoner abuse in Iraq.

Iraq: Prison Workers Questioned
by T. Christian Miller and Greg MillerLos Angeles Times
May 1st, 2004
CACI International of Arlington, Va., said the employees had volunteered to be interviewed in a case in which six U.S. soldiers have been charged with sexually and physically abusing Iraqi prisoners at Abu Ghraib prison outside Baghdad.

USA: Spying for Fun and Profit
by Kari LydersenAlternet
May 28th, 2003
Survelliance technologies raise serious questions about invasions of privacy and violations of civil liberties. They also cost a lot of money. Taxpayers fund this massively beefed up security. Private corporations and even individuals are also paying large amounts to boost their own security procedures in light of the war on terrorism. Naturally, someone is also profiting off this boom.

US: 'New War' May Shift Defense Spending
by Gary GentileAssociated Press
October 1st, 2001
In the nation's "new kind of war" on terrorism, defense spending is likely to focus as much on information and surveillance as bombs and bullets.

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